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Indices for assessing coral reef fish biodiversity: the need for a change in habits.

Loiseau N, Gaertner JC - Ecol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: As a result, the most widely used indices (species richness, Shannon, etc.) would appear to be poorly suited to meeting the main challenges facing the monitoring of coral reef fish biodiversity in the future.Our results clearly show that coral reef scientists should rather take advantage of the multicomponent aspect of biodiversity.The aim of these guidelines was to achieve a better match between the properties of the selected indices and the context of each study (e.g. expected effect of the main structuring factors, nature of data available).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of French Polynesia - UMR-241 EIO (UPF IRD Ifremer ILM) Papeete French Polynesia.

ABSTRACT
We present the first representative and quantified overview of the indices used worldwide for assessing the biodiversity of coral reef fishes. On this basis, we discuss the suitability and drawbacks of the indices most widely used in the assessment of coral fish biodiversity. An extensive and systematic survey of the literature focused on coral reef fish biodiversity was conducted from 1990 up to the present. We found that the multicomponent aspect of biodiversity, which is considered as a key feature of biodiversity for numerous terrestrial and marine ecosystems, has been poorly taken into account in coral reef fish studies. Species richness is still strongly dominant while other diversity components, such as functional diversity, are underestimated even when functional information is available. We also demonstrate that the reason for choosing particular indices is often unclear, mainly based on empirical rationales and/or the reproduction of widespread habits, but generally with no clear relevance with regard to the aims of the studies. As a result, the most widely used indices (species richness, Shannon, etc.) would appear to be poorly suited to meeting the main challenges facing the monitoring of coral reef fish biodiversity in the future. Our results clearly show that coral reef scientists should rather take advantage of the multicomponent aspect of biodiversity. To facilitate this approach, we propose general guidelines to serve as a basis for the selection of indices that provide complementary and relevant information for monitoring the response of coral reef fish biodiversity in the face of structuring factors (natural or anthropic). The aim of these guidelines was to achieve a better match between the properties of the selected indices and the context of each study (e.g. expected effect of the main structuring factors, nature of data available).

No MeSH data available.


Assessing coral reef fish diversity. Relative importance of the main diversity components assessed in the set of the 205 papers reviewed in this study. Radar plot shows the percentage of publications assessing each diversity component. The corresponding number of papers is given in brackets. Heterogeneous indices that mix two components (number of species and equitability) are also displayed because of their popularity.
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ece31619-fig-0001: Assessing coral reef fish diversity. Relative importance of the main diversity components assessed in the set of the 205 papers reviewed in this study. Radar plot shows the percentage of publications assessing each diversity component. The corresponding number of papers is given in brackets. Heterogeneous indices that mix two components (number of species and equitability) are also displayed because of their popularity.

Mentions: Our results showed that coral reef fish biodiversity is generally assessed using a small range of families of indices (Figs. 1), with a high dominance of indices representing the “number of species” component, and to a lesser extent of heterogeneous indices (e.g., Shannon Index, Shannon and Weaver 1949). Indices of this family are commonly called heterogeneous indices (Peet 1974; Williams et al. 2005) because they are not focused on a single component, but take into account both the number of species and the evenness components. Indices allowing the assessment of other diversity components are either under‐represented (e.g., functional diversity), or not represented at all (e.g., phylogenetic diversity).


Indices for assessing coral reef fish biodiversity: the need for a change in habits.

Loiseau N, Gaertner JC - Ecol Evol (2015)

Assessing coral reef fish diversity. Relative importance of the main diversity components assessed in the set of the 205 papers reviewed in this study. Radar plot shows the percentage of publications assessing each diversity component. The corresponding number of papers is given in brackets. Heterogeneous indices that mix two components (number of species and equitability) are also displayed because of their popularity.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588647&req=5

ece31619-fig-0001: Assessing coral reef fish diversity. Relative importance of the main diversity components assessed in the set of the 205 papers reviewed in this study. Radar plot shows the percentage of publications assessing each diversity component. The corresponding number of papers is given in brackets. Heterogeneous indices that mix two components (number of species and equitability) are also displayed because of their popularity.
Mentions: Our results showed that coral reef fish biodiversity is generally assessed using a small range of families of indices (Figs. 1), with a high dominance of indices representing the “number of species” component, and to a lesser extent of heterogeneous indices (e.g., Shannon Index, Shannon and Weaver 1949). Indices of this family are commonly called heterogeneous indices (Peet 1974; Williams et al. 2005) because they are not focused on a single component, but take into account both the number of species and the evenness components. Indices allowing the assessment of other diversity components are either under‐represented (e.g., functional diversity), or not represented at all (e.g., phylogenetic diversity).

Bottom Line: As a result, the most widely used indices (species richness, Shannon, etc.) would appear to be poorly suited to meeting the main challenges facing the monitoring of coral reef fish biodiversity in the future.Our results clearly show that coral reef scientists should rather take advantage of the multicomponent aspect of biodiversity.The aim of these guidelines was to achieve a better match between the properties of the selected indices and the context of each study (e.g. expected effect of the main structuring factors, nature of data available).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of French Polynesia - UMR-241 EIO (UPF IRD Ifremer ILM) Papeete French Polynesia.

ABSTRACT
We present the first representative and quantified overview of the indices used worldwide for assessing the biodiversity of coral reef fishes. On this basis, we discuss the suitability and drawbacks of the indices most widely used in the assessment of coral fish biodiversity. An extensive and systematic survey of the literature focused on coral reef fish biodiversity was conducted from 1990 up to the present. We found that the multicomponent aspect of biodiversity, which is considered as a key feature of biodiversity for numerous terrestrial and marine ecosystems, has been poorly taken into account in coral reef fish studies. Species richness is still strongly dominant while other diversity components, such as functional diversity, are underestimated even when functional information is available. We also demonstrate that the reason for choosing particular indices is often unclear, mainly based on empirical rationales and/or the reproduction of widespread habits, but generally with no clear relevance with regard to the aims of the studies. As a result, the most widely used indices (species richness, Shannon, etc.) would appear to be poorly suited to meeting the main challenges facing the monitoring of coral reef fish biodiversity in the future. Our results clearly show that coral reef scientists should rather take advantage of the multicomponent aspect of biodiversity. To facilitate this approach, we propose general guidelines to serve as a basis for the selection of indices that provide complementary and relevant information for monitoring the response of coral reef fish biodiversity in the face of structuring factors (natural or anthropic). The aim of these guidelines was to achieve a better match between the properties of the selected indices and the context of each study (e.g. expected effect of the main structuring factors, nature of data available).

No MeSH data available.