Limits...
Interspecific variation in the phenology of advertisement calling in a temperate Australian frog community.

Heard GW, Canessa S, Parris KM - Ecol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: We found limited overlap in the predicted seasonal peaks of calling among these species.In contrast, closely related and ecologically similar species (Crinia signfera and Crinia parinsignifera;Litoria ewingii and Litoria verreauxii) appear to have staggered seasonal peaks of calling.In combination with interspecific variation in the meteorological correlates of calling, these results may be indicative of temporal partitioning of reproductive activity to facilitate coexistence, as has been reported for tropical and temperate anurans from other parts of the globe.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of BioSciences The University of Melbourne Parkville Victoria 3010 Australia ; Department of Biology University of York Wentworth Way York YO10 5DD UK.

ABSTRACT
Spatial and temporal partitioning of resources underlies the coexistence of species with similar niches. In communities of frogs and toads, the phenology of advertisement calling provides insights into temporal partitioning of reproductive effort and its implications for community dynamics. This study assessed the phenology of advertisement calling in an anuran community from Melbourne, in southern Australia. We collated data from 1432 surveys of 253 sites and used logistic regression to quantify seasonality in the nightly probability of calling and the influence of meteorological variables on this probability for six species of frogs. We found limited overlap in the predicted seasonal peaks of calling among these species. Those shown to have overlapping calling peaks are unlikely to be in direct competition, due to differences in larval ecology (Crinia signifera and Litoria ewingii) or differences in calling behavior and acoustics (Limnodynastes dumerilii and Litoria raniformis). In contrast, closely related and ecologically similar species (Crinia signfera and Crinia parinsignifera;Litoria ewingii and Litoria verreauxii) appear to have staggered seasonal peaks of calling. In combination with interspecific variation in the meteorological correlates of calling, these results may be indicative of temporal partitioning of reproductive activity to facilitate coexistence, as has been reported for tropical and temperate anurans from other parts of the globe.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The estimated seasonal peak of the nightly probability of calling for the six commonly detected species. Dots are the means and the gray lines the 95% CIs. Estimates are taken from the top model for each species and assume that all other variables influencing the detection of calls (meteorological variables and survey effort) are at their mean values.
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ece31666-fig-0003: The estimated seasonal peak of the nightly probability of calling for the six commonly detected species. Dots are the means and the gray lines the 95% CIs. Estimates are taken from the top model for each species and assume that all other variables influencing the detection of calls (meteorological variables and survey effort) are at their mean values.

Mentions: Although there was considerable temporal overlap in calling activity (Fig. 1), the seasonality and predicted peak of calling varied among species (Figs. 2, 3). Of 15 possible species‐to‐species comparisons of the predicted peak in the nightly probability of calling, the 95% credible intervals overlapped in only four cases (C. signifera & Lim. tasmaniensis; C. signifera & Lit. ewingii; Lim. dumerilii & Lit. raniformis; Lim. tasmaniensis & Lit. verreauxii; Fig. 3).


Interspecific variation in the phenology of advertisement calling in a temperate Australian frog community.

Heard GW, Canessa S, Parris KM - Ecol Evol (2015)

The estimated seasonal peak of the nightly probability of calling for the six commonly detected species. Dots are the means and the gray lines the 95% CIs. Estimates are taken from the top model for each species and assume that all other variables influencing the detection of calls (meteorological variables and survey effort) are at their mean values.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588642&req=5

ece31666-fig-0003: The estimated seasonal peak of the nightly probability of calling for the six commonly detected species. Dots are the means and the gray lines the 95% CIs. Estimates are taken from the top model for each species and assume that all other variables influencing the detection of calls (meteorological variables and survey effort) are at their mean values.
Mentions: Although there was considerable temporal overlap in calling activity (Fig. 1), the seasonality and predicted peak of calling varied among species (Figs. 2, 3). Of 15 possible species‐to‐species comparisons of the predicted peak in the nightly probability of calling, the 95% credible intervals overlapped in only four cases (C. signifera & Lim. tasmaniensis; C. signifera & Lit. ewingii; Lim. dumerilii & Lit. raniformis; Lim. tasmaniensis & Lit. verreauxii; Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: We found limited overlap in the predicted seasonal peaks of calling among these species.In contrast, closely related and ecologically similar species (Crinia signfera and Crinia parinsignifera;Litoria ewingii and Litoria verreauxii) appear to have staggered seasonal peaks of calling.In combination with interspecific variation in the meteorological correlates of calling, these results may be indicative of temporal partitioning of reproductive activity to facilitate coexistence, as has been reported for tropical and temperate anurans from other parts of the globe.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of BioSciences The University of Melbourne Parkville Victoria 3010 Australia ; Department of Biology University of York Wentworth Way York YO10 5DD UK.

ABSTRACT
Spatial and temporal partitioning of resources underlies the coexistence of species with similar niches. In communities of frogs and toads, the phenology of advertisement calling provides insights into temporal partitioning of reproductive effort and its implications for community dynamics. This study assessed the phenology of advertisement calling in an anuran community from Melbourne, in southern Australia. We collated data from 1432 surveys of 253 sites and used logistic regression to quantify seasonality in the nightly probability of calling and the influence of meteorological variables on this probability for six species of frogs. We found limited overlap in the predicted seasonal peaks of calling among these species. Those shown to have overlapping calling peaks are unlikely to be in direct competition, due to differences in larval ecology (Crinia signifera and Litoria ewingii) or differences in calling behavior and acoustics (Limnodynastes dumerilii and Litoria raniformis). In contrast, closely related and ecologically similar species (Crinia signfera and Crinia parinsignifera;Litoria ewingii and Litoria verreauxii) appear to have staggered seasonal peaks of calling. In combination with interspecific variation in the meteorological correlates of calling, these results may be indicative of temporal partitioning of reproductive activity to facilitate coexistence, as has been reported for tropical and temperate anurans from other parts of the globe.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus