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Pathogen infection drives patterns of nutrient resorption in citrus plants.

Cao J, Cheng C, Yang J, Wang Q - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: We investigated the effects of 'Ca.P resorption efficiency substantially decreased in infected C. reticulata plants relative to the healthy plants in summer, which may account for the marked decrease in the average fruit yield.However, for C. maxima plants, HLB had no significant effects on N:P ratio in live leaves and resorption efficiency as well as on fruit yield.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Vegetation and Environmental Change, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093, China.

ABSTRACT
Nutrient resorption processes in the plants infected by pathogen remain poorly understood. Huanglongbing (HLB) is a destructive disease of citrus. HLB-pathogen 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' grows specifically in the phloem of hosts and may cause problems in the plant vascular system after infection. Therefore, it brings a great concern about the phloem nutrient transport and nutrient intra-cycling in HLB-affected plants. We investigated the effects of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' infection on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and resorption in different citrus species (i.e. Citrus reticulata, Citrus limon and Citrus maxima). HLB-pathogen infection had distinctive impacts on nutrient resorption in different species. P resorption efficiency substantially decreased in infected C. reticulata plants relative to the healthy plants in summer, which may account for the marked decrease in the average fruit yield. P resorption was more efficient in infected C. limon plants than in the healthy plants. However, for C. maxima plants, HLB had no significant effects on N:P ratio in live leaves and resorption efficiency as well as on fruit yield. Keeping efficient internal nutrient cycling can be a strategy of citrus species being tolerant to HLB.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

N concentrations in live- and senesced-leaves of different citrus species.Values are mean ± Se, n = 5. *, ** and *** above bars indicate significant differences at P < 0.05, 0.01 and 0.001, respectively, derived from the results of paired t-tests.
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f2: N concentrations in live- and senesced-leaves of different citrus species.Values are mean ± Se, n = 5. *, ** and *** above bars indicate significant differences at P < 0.05, 0.01 and 0.001, respectively, derived from the results of paired t-tests.

Mentions: The ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ infection had significant effects on N and P concentrations in live leaves of citrus plants in our study. Even so, most of the N and P concentrations in live leaves of the ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’-infected plants still remained at optimum or high levels, according to the criteria shown in Table 1. There were two exceptions. Leaf N and P concentrations in infected C. reticulata plants in June dropped to the deficient and low levels. N concentrations in C. limon plants, which were deficient in the healthy trees as an unusual case, reached to the low level in the infected trees. Repeated measure-ANOVA based on mixed models shows that different species and sampling dates also have significant effects on concentrations of N and P in live leaves, and that there are interactive effects of species and health status on live-leaf N and P concentrations (P < 0.0001; Table 2). For example, in June, the concentrations of live-leaf N and P in C. reticulata plants significantly decreased in response to the HLB-pathogen infection, whereas those in C. limon plants remained unchanged (Figs 1a and 2a). In October, the P concentration of live leaves in infected C. reticulata plants recorded a marked increase (P < 0.001), while concentrations of live-leaf N and P in infected C. limon plants showed no significant changes, compared with those in the healthy plants (Figs 1b and 2b).


Pathogen infection drives patterns of nutrient resorption in citrus plants.

Cao J, Cheng C, Yang J, Wang Q - Sci Rep (2015)

N concentrations in live- and senesced-leaves of different citrus species.Values are mean ± Se, n = 5. *, ** and *** above bars indicate significant differences at P < 0.05, 0.01 and 0.001, respectively, derived from the results of paired t-tests.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588592&req=5

f2: N concentrations in live- and senesced-leaves of different citrus species.Values are mean ± Se, n = 5. *, ** and *** above bars indicate significant differences at P < 0.05, 0.01 and 0.001, respectively, derived from the results of paired t-tests.
Mentions: The ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ infection had significant effects on N and P concentrations in live leaves of citrus plants in our study. Even so, most of the N and P concentrations in live leaves of the ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’-infected plants still remained at optimum or high levels, according to the criteria shown in Table 1. There were two exceptions. Leaf N and P concentrations in infected C. reticulata plants in June dropped to the deficient and low levels. N concentrations in C. limon plants, which were deficient in the healthy trees as an unusual case, reached to the low level in the infected trees. Repeated measure-ANOVA based on mixed models shows that different species and sampling dates also have significant effects on concentrations of N and P in live leaves, and that there are interactive effects of species and health status on live-leaf N and P concentrations (P < 0.0001; Table 2). For example, in June, the concentrations of live-leaf N and P in C. reticulata plants significantly decreased in response to the HLB-pathogen infection, whereas those in C. limon plants remained unchanged (Figs 1a and 2a). In October, the P concentration of live leaves in infected C. reticulata plants recorded a marked increase (P < 0.001), while concentrations of live-leaf N and P in infected C. limon plants showed no significant changes, compared with those in the healthy plants (Figs 1b and 2b).

Bottom Line: We investigated the effects of 'Ca.P resorption efficiency substantially decreased in infected C. reticulata plants relative to the healthy plants in summer, which may account for the marked decrease in the average fruit yield.However, for C. maxima plants, HLB had no significant effects on N:P ratio in live leaves and resorption efficiency as well as on fruit yield.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Vegetation and Environmental Change, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093, China.

ABSTRACT
Nutrient resorption processes in the plants infected by pathogen remain poorly understood. Huanglongbing (HLB) is a destructive disease of citrus. HLB-pathogen 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' grows specifically in the phloem of hosts and may cause problems in the plant vascular system after infection. Therefore, it brings a great concern about the phloem nutrient transport and nutrient intra-cycling in HLB-affected plants. We investigated the effects of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' infection on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and resorption in different citrus species (i.e. Citrus reticulata, Citrus limon and Citrus maxima). HLB-pathogen infection had distinctive impacts on nutrient resorption in different species. P resorption efficiency substantially decreased in infected C. reticulata plants relative to the healthy plants in summer, which may account for the marked decrease in the average fruit yield. P resorption was more efficient in infected C. limon plants than in the healthy plants. However, for C. maxima plants, HLB had no significant effects on N:P ratio in live leaves and resorption efficiency as well as on fruit yield. Keeping efficient internal nutrient cycling can be a strategy of citrus species being tolerant to HLB.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus