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Infants born large-for-gestational-age display slower growth in early infancy, but no epigenetic changes at birth.

Chiavaroli V, Cutfield WS, Derraik JG, Pan Z, Ngo S, Sheppard A, Craigie S, Stone P, Sadler L, Ahlsson F - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: At birth, LGA infants had greater weight (p < 0.0001), length (p < 0.0001), ponderal index (p = 0.020), as well as greater head (p < 0.0001), chest (p = 0.044), and abdominal (p = 0.007) circumferences than AGA newborns.Genome-wide analysis showed no epigenetic differences between LGA and AGA infants.In addition, differences between AGA and LGA newborns were not associated with epigenetic changes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
We evaluated the growth patterns of infants born large-for-gestational-age (LGA) from birth to age 1 year compared to those born appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA). In addition, we investigated possible epigenetic changes associated with being born LGA. Seventy-one newborns were classified by birth weight as AGA (10(th)-90(th) percentile; n = 42) or LGA (>90(th) percentile; n = 29). Post-natal follow-up until age 1 year was performed with clinical assessments at 3, 6, and 12 months. Genome-wide DNA methylation was analysed on umbilical tissue in 19 AGA and 27 LGA infants. At birth, LGA infants had greater weight (p < 0.0001), length (p < 0.0001), ponderal index (p = 0.020), as well as greater head (p < 0.0001), chest (p = 0.044), and abdominal (p = 0.007) circumferences than AGA newborns. LGA infants were still larger at the age of 3 months, but by age 6 months there were no more differences between groups, due to higher length and weight increments in AGA infants between 0 and 6 months (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.002, respectively). Genome-wide analysis showed no epigenetic differences between LGA and AGA infants. Overall, LGA infants had slower growth in early infancy, being anthropometrically similar to AGA infants by 6 months of age. In addition, differences between AGA and LGA newborns were not associated with epigenetic changes.

No MeSH data available.


Length and weight increments in AGA (continuous) and LGA (dashed) infants from birth to 12 months of age.Data are means and 95% confidence intervals adjusted for confounding factors in the multivariate models. **p < 0.01 and ****p < 0.0001 for differences at a given time point; ††p < 0.01 and ††††p < 0.0001 for differences in length or weight velocity.
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f1: Length and weight increments in AGA (continuous) and LGA (dashed) infants from birth to 12 months of age.Data are means and 95% confidence intervals adjusted for confounding factors in the multivariate models. **p < 0.01 and ****p < 0.0001 for differences at a given time point; ††p < 0.01 and ††††p < 0.0001 for differences in length or weight velocity.

Mentions: In the first 6 months of life, LGA infants grew significantly slower than those born AGA: length increment 15.1 vs 18.3 cm, respectively (p < 0.0001) and weight increment 4.13 vs 4.87 kg, respectively (p = 0.002) (Fig. 1). These differences accounted for the fact that both groups were anthropometrically similar by 6 months of age. LGA and AGA infants were still similar at the one-year follow-up (Table 3), as length and weight increments were virtually identical in the two groups between 6 and 12 months of age (7.7 cm and 2.1 kg for both groups).


Infants born large-for-gestational-age display slower growth in early infancy, but no epigenetic changes at birth.

Chiavaroli V, Cutfield WS, Derraik JG, Pan Z, Ngo S, Sheppard A, Craigie S, Stone P, Sadler L, Ahlsson F - Sci Rep (2015)

Length and weight increments in AGA (continuous) and LGA (dashed) infants from birth to 12 months of age.Data are means and 95% confidence intervals adjusted for confounding factors in the multivariate models. **p < 0.01 and ****p < 0.0001 for differences at a given time point; ††p < 0.01 and ††††p < 0.0001 for differences in length or weight velocity.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588582&req=5

f1: Length and weight increments in AGA (continuous) and LGA (dashed) infants from birth to 12 months of age.Data are means and 95% confidence intervals adjusted for confounding factors in the multivariate models. **p < 0.01 and ****p < 0.0001 for differences at a given time point; ††p < 0.01 and ††††p < 0.0001 for differences in length or weight velocity.
Mentions: In the first 6 months of life, LGA infants grew significantly slower than those born AGA: length increment 15.1 vs 18.3 cm, respectively (p < 0.0001) and weight increment 4.13 vs 4.87 kg, respectively (p = 0.002) (Fig. 1). These differences accounted for the fact that both groups were anthropometrically similar by 6 months of age. LGA and AGA infants were still similar at the one-year follow-up (Table 3), as length and weight increments were virtually identical in the two groups between 6 and 12 months of age (7.7 cm and 2.1 kg for both groups).

Bottom Line: At birth, LGA infants had greater weight (p < 0.0001), length (p < 0.0001), ponderal index (p = 0.020), as well as greater head (p < 0.0001), chest (p = 0.044), and abdominal (p = 0.007) circumferences than AGA newborns.Genome-wide analysis showed no epigenetic differences between LGA and AGA infants.In addition, differences between AGA and LGA newborns were not associated with epigenetic changes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
We evaluated the growth patterns of infants born large-for-gestational-age (LGA) from birth to age 1 year compared to those born appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA). In addition, we investigated possible epigenetic changes associated with being born LGA. Seventy-one newborns were classified by birth weight as AGA (10(th)-90(th) percentile; n = 42) or LGA (>90(th) percentile; n = 29). Post-natal follow-up until age 1 year was performed with clinical assessments at 3, 6, and 12 months. Genome-wide DNA methylation was analysed on umbilical tissue in 19 AGA and 27 LGA infants. At birth, LGA infants had greater weight (p < 0.0001), length (p < 0.0001), ponderal index (p = 0.020), as well as greater head (p < 0.0001), chest (p = 0.044), and abdominal (p = 0.007) circumferences than AGA newborns. LGA infants were still larger at the age of 3 months, but by age 6 months there were no more differences between groups, due to higher length and weight increments in AGA infants between 0 and 6 months (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.002, respectively). Genome-wide analysis showed no epigenetic differences between LGA and AGA infants. Overall, LGA infants had slower growth in early infancy, being anthropometrically similar to AGA infants by 6 months of age. In addition, differences between AGA and LGA newborns were not associated with epigenetic changes.

No MeSH data available.