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Motor function benefits of visual restoration measured in age-related cataract and simulated patients: Case-control and clinical experimental studies.

Ayaki M, Nagura T, Toyama Y, Negishi K, Tsubota K - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: In simulated patients, mean velocity was 87.0 ± 11.4% of normal vision with a 3° visual field and 92.4 ± 12.3% of normal when counting fingers.Initial velocity was 89.1 ± 14.6% of normal vision with a 3° visual field and 92.7 ± 11.6% of normal when counting fingers.There was a significant difference between normal and impaired visual function (P < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the present study was to measure gait velocity in cataract and simulated patients. The study was performed on 239 cataract patients, 115 age-matched subjects, and 11 simulated patients. We measured gait velocity and analyzed gait using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Mean gait velocity before and 2 and 7 months after cataract surgery was 0.91 ± 0.19, 1.04 ± 0.21, and 1.06 ± 0.21 m/s, respectively, for males and 0.84 ± 0.22, 0.91 ± 0.24, and 0.92 ± 0.25 m/s, respectively, for females. The increase after surgery was significant in both groups at 7 months (P < 0.05). Gait velocity was significantly slower in cataract patients compared with controls before surgery, but no longer different after surgery. In simulated patients, mean velocity was 87.0 ± 11.4% of normal vision with a 3° visual field and 92.4 ± 12.3% of normal when counting fingers. Initial velocity was 89.1 ± 14.6% of normal vision with a 3° visual field and 92.7 ± 11.6% of normal when counting fingers. There was a significant difference between normal and impaired visual function (P < 0.05). The results demonstrate the close relationship between visual function and gait in cataract patients and simulated patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Four-meter gait velocity in male (closed symbols) and female (open symbols) cataract patients before and 2 and 7 months after surgery. Gait velocity increased continuously up to 7 months after surgery with statistical significance in both groups (*P < 0.05 vs preoperative velocity, paired t-test). (b) Scatter plot of gait velocity versus age of cataract patients before (closed symbols) and 2 months after (open symbols) surgery. Note that age was strongly correlated with gait velocity. The regression lines were y = −0.0136x + 1.8845; R2 = 0.2753 (solid line) for before surgery and y = −0.0134x + 1.9175; R2 = 0.2743 (dashed line) for after surgery.
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f2: (a) Four-meter gait velocity in male (closed symbols) and female (open symbols) cataract patients before and 2 and 7 months after surgery. Gait velocity increased continuously up to 7 months after surgery with statistical significance in both groups (*P < 0.05 vs preoperative velocity, paired t-test). (b) Scatter plot of gait velocity versus age of cataract patients before (closed symbols) and 2 months after (open symbols) surgery. Note that age was strongly correlated with gait velocity. The regression lines were y = −0.0136x + 1.8845; R2 = 0.2753 (solid line) for before surgery and y = −0.0134x + 1.9175; R2 = 0.2743 (dashed line) for after surgery.

Mentions: Demographics and gait velocity for cataract patients are given in Table 1. Generally, gait velocity was significantly greater for male than female patients before and after surgery. Mean gait velocity increased significantly up to 7 months after surgery in both groups (Fig. 2; P < 0.05, paired t-test). Mean gait velocity in male (n = 40; mean age 74.8 ± 5.6 years) and female (n = 75; mean age 75.0 ± 6.7 years) controls with normal vision was 0.92 ± 0.21 and 0.95 ± 0.17 m/s, respectively. The difference in gait velocity between cataract patients and controls was significant before surgery (P < 0.001, unpaired t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test), but not 2 months after surgery, in both gender groups.


Motor function benefits of visual restoration measured in age-related cataract and simulated patients: Case-control and clinical experimental studies.

Ayaki M, Nagura T, Toyama Y, Negishi K, Tsubota K - Sci Rep (2015)

(a) Four-meter gait velocity in male (closed symbols) and female (open symbols) cataract patients before and 2 and 7 months after surgery. Gait velocity increased continuously up to 7 months after surgery with statistical significance in both groups (*P < 0.05 vs preoperative velocity, paired t-test). (b) Scatter plot of gait velocity versus age of cataract patients before (closed symbols) and 2 months after (open symbols) surgery. Note that age was strongly correlated with gait velocity. The regression lines were y = −0.0136x + 1.8845; R2 = 0.2753 (solid line) for before surgery and y = −0.0134x + 1.9175; R2 = 0.2743 (dashed line) for after surgery.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588563&req=5

f2: (a) Four-meter gait velocity in male (closed symbols) and female (open symbols) cataract patients before and 2 and 7 months after surgery. Gait velocity increased continuously up to 7 months after surgery with statistical significance in both groups (*P < 0.05 vs preoperative velocity, paired t-test). (b) Scatter plot of gait velocity versus age of cataract patients before (closed symbols) and 2 months after (open symbols) surgery. Note that age was strongly correlated with gait velocity. The regression lines were y = −0.0136x + 1.8845; R2 = 0.2753 (solid line) for before surgery and y = −0.0134x + 1.9175; R2 = 0.2743 (dashed line) for after surgery.
Mentions: Demographics and gait velocity for cataract patients are given in Table 1. Generally, gait velocity was significantly greater for male than female patients before and after surgery. Mean gait velocity increased significantly up to 7 months after surgery in both groups (Fig. 2; P < 0.05, paired t-test). Mean gait velocity in male (n = 40; mean age 74.8 ± 5.6 years) and female (n = 75; mean age 75.0 ± 6.7 years) controls with normal vision was 0.92 ± 0.21 and 0.95 ± 0.17 m/s, respectively. The difference in gait velocity between cataract patients and controls was significant before surgery (P < 0.001, unpaired t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test), but not 2 months after surgery, in both gender groups.

Bottom Line: In simulated patients, mean velocity was 87.0 ± 11.4% of normal vision with a 3° visual field and 92.4 ± 12.3% of normal when counting fingers.Initial velocity was 89.1 ± 14.6% of normal vision with a 3° visual field and 92.7 ± 11.6% of normal when counting fingers.There was a significant difference between normal and impaired visual function (P < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the present study was to measure gait velocity in cataract and simulated patients. The study was performed on 239 cataract patients, 115 age-matched subjects, and 11 simulated patients. We measured gait velocity and analyzed gait using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Mean gait velocity before and 2 and 7 months after cataract surgery was 0.91 ± 0.19, 1.04 ± 0.21, and 1.06 ± 0.21 m/s, respectively, for males and 0.84 ± 0.22, 0.91 ± 0.24, and 0.92 ± 0.25 m/s, respectively, for females. The increase after surgery was significant in both groups at 7 months (P < 0.05). Gait velocity was significantly slower in cataract patients compared with controls before surgery, but no longer different after surgery. In simulated patients, mean velocity was 87.0 ± 11.4% of normal vision with a 3° visual field and 92.4 ± 12.3% of normal when counting fingers. Initial velocity was 89.1 ± 14.6% of normal vision with a 3° visual field and 92.7 ± 11.6% of normal when counting fingers. There was a significant difference between normal and impaired visual function (P < 0.05). The results demonstrate the close relationship between visual function and gait in cataract patients and simulated patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus