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Analysis of Low-Field MRI Scanners for Evaluation of Shoulder Pathology Based on Arthroscopy.

Lee CS, Davis SM, McGroder C, Kouk S, Sung RM, Stetson WB, Powell SE - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Many studies have compared the diagnostic capabilities of low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners to high-field MRI scanners; however, few have evaluated the low-field MRI diagnoses compared with intraoperative findings.For anterior labral lesions, the values were 86%, 99%, 86%, and 99%, and for superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, the values were 20%, 100%, 100%, and 79%, respectively.Low-field MRI is an accurate tool for evaluation of partial- and full-thickness rotator cuff tears; however, it is not effective in diagnosing SLAP lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Stetson Powell Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Burbank, California, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many studies have compared the diagnostic capabilities of low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners to high-field MRI scanners; however, few have evaluated the low-field MRI diagnoses compared with intraoperative findings.

Purpose: To determine the accuracy and sensitivity of low-field MRI scanners in diagnosing lesions of the rotator cuff and glenoid labrum.

Study design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3.

Methods: Over a 2-year period, MRI examinations without intra-articular contrast were performed on 79 patients for shoulder pathologies using an in-office 0.2-T extremity scanner. The MRI examinations were read by board-certified, musculoskeletal fellowship-trained radiologists. All patients underwent shoulder arthroscopy performed by a single sports fellowship-trained orthopaedic surgeon within a mean time of 56 days (range, 8-188 days) after the MRI examination. The mean patient age was 54 years (range, 18-81 years). Operative notes from the shoulder arthroscopies were then retrospectively reviewed by a single blinded observer, and the intraoperative findings were compared with the MRI reports.

Results: For partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 85%, 89%, 79%, and 92%, respectively. For full-thickness rotator cuff tears, the respective values were 97%, 100%, 100%, and 98%. For anterior labral lesions, the values were 86%, 99%, 86%, and 99%, and for superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, the values were 20%, 100%, 100%, and 79%, respectively.

Conclusion: Low-field MRI is an accurate tool for evaluation of partial- and full-thickness rotator cuff tears; however, it is not effective in diagnosing SLAP lesions. More information is needed to properly assess its ability to diagnose anterior and posterior labral lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Patient positioned in the E-Scan Opera Esaote 0.2-T scanner with left arm in the supine position and the shoulder at neutral.
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fig1-2325967114540407: Patient positioned in the E-Scan Opera Esaote 0.2-T scanner with left arm in the supine position and the shoulder at neutral.

Mentions: Each patient signed an informed consent form and was screened by the MRI technician for safety. The MRI technician placed each patient’s arm in the supine position, with the shoulder at neutral (Figure 1). The following 2-dimensional acquisitions were obtained: proton density (PD)–weighted oblique coronal and oblique sagittal planes, T2-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) oblique coronal and oblique axial planes, gradient echo (GRE) oblique axial plane, and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) oblique coronal plane. No 3-dimensional sequences were utilized. The average imaging time was approximately 45 minutes, and the imaging parameters are displayed in Table 1.


Analysis of Low-Field MRI Scanners for Evaluation of Shoulder Pathology Based on Arthroscopy.

Lee CS, Davis SM, McGroder C, Kouk S, Sung RM, Stetson WB, Powell SE - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Patient positioned in the E-Scan Opera Esaote 0.2-T scanner with left arm in the supine position and the shoulder at neutral.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588525&req=5

fig1-2325967114540407: Patient positioned in the E-Scan Opera Esaote 0.2-T scanner with left arm in the supine position and the shoulder at neutral.
Mentions: Each patient signed an informed consent form and was screened by the MRI technician for safety. The MRI technician placed each patient’s arm in the supine position, with the shoulder at neutral (Figure 1). The following 2-dimensional acquisitions were obtained: proton density (PD)–weighted oblique coronal and oblique sagittal planes, T2-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) oblique coronal and oblique axial planes, gradient echo (GRE) oblique axial plane, and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) oblique coronal plane. No 3-dimensional sequences were utilized. The average imaging time was approximately 45 minutes, and the imaging parameters are displayed in Table 1.

Bottom Line: Many studies have compared the diagnostic capabilities of low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners to high-field MRI scanners; however, few have evaluated the low-field MRI diagnoses compared with intraoperative findings.For anterior labral lesions, the values were 86%, 99%, 86%, and 99%, and for superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, the values were 20%, 100%, 100%, and 79%, respectively.Low-field MRI is an accurate tool for evaluation of partial- and full-thickness rotator cuff tears; however, it is not effective in diagnosing SLAP lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Stetson Powell Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Burbank, California, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many studies have compared the diagnostic capabilities of low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners to high-field MRI scanners; however, few have evaluated the low-field MRI diagnoses compared with intraoperative findings.

Purpose: To determine the accuracy and sensitivity of low-field MRI scanners in diagnosing lesions of the rotator cuff and glenoid labrum.

Study design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3.

Methods: Over a 2-year period, MRI examinations without intra-articular contrast were performed on 79 patients for shoulder pathologies using an in-office 0.2-T extremity scanner. The MRI examinations were read by board-certified, musculoskeletal fellowship-trained radiologists. All patients underwent shoulder arthroscopy performed by a single sports fellowship-trained orthopaedic surgeon within a mean time of 56 days (range, 8-188 days) after the MRI examination. The mean patient age was 54 years (range, 18-81 years). Operative notes from the shoulder arthroscopies were then retrospectively reviewed by a single blinded observer, and the intraoperative findings were compared with the MRI reports.

Results: For partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 85%, 89%, 79%, and 92%, respectively. For full-thickness rotator cuff tears, the respective values were 97%, 100%, 100%, and 98%. For anterior labral lesions, the values were 86%, 99%, 86%, and 99%, and for superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, the values were 20%, 100%, 100%, and 79%, respectively.

Conclusion: Low-field MRI is an accurate tool for evaluation of partial- and full-thickness rotator cuff tears; however, it is not effective in diagnosing SLAP lesions. More information is needed to properly assess its ability to diagnose anterior and posterior labral lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus