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Genetic diversity and evolutionary insights of respiratory syncytial virus A ON1 genotype: global and local transmission dynamics.

Duvvuri VR, Granados A, Rosenfeld P, Bahl J, Eshaghi A, Gubbay JB - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Mean evolutionary rate of the global ON1 was 4.10 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year (95% BCI 3.1-5.0 × 10(-3)), not significantly different to that of Ontario ON1.The estimated mean reproductive number (R0 = ∼ 1.01) from global and Ontario sequences showed no significant difference and implies stability among global RSV-A ON1.These findings underscore the importance of continual molecular surveillance of RSV in order to gain a better understanding of epidemics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) A ON1 genotype, first detected in 2010 in Ontario, Canada, has been documented in 21 countries to date. This study investigated persistence and transmission dynamics of ON1 by grouping 406 randomly selected RSV-positive specimens submitted to Public Health Ontario from August 2011 to August 2012; RSV-A-positive specimens were genotyped. We identified 370 RSV-A (181 NA1, 135 NA2, 51 ON1 3 GA5) and 36 RSV-B positive specimens. We aligned time-stamped second hypervariable region (330 bp) of G-gene sequence data (global, n = 483; and Ontario, n = 60) to evaluate transmission dynamics. Global data suggests that the most recent common ancestor of ON1 emerged during the 2008-2009 season. Mean evolutionary rate of the global ON1 was 4.10 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year (95% BCI 3.1-5.0 × 10(-3)), not significantly different to that of Ontario ON1. The estimated mean reproductive number (R0 = ∼ 1.01) from global and Ontario sequences showed no significant difference and implies stability among global RSV-A ON1. This study suggests that local epidemics exhibit similar underlying evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics to that of the persistent global RSV-A ON1 population. These findings underscore the importance of continual molecular surveillance of RSV in order to gain a better understanding of epidemics.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Circulating lineages of RSV-A ON1 genotype globally during 2010 to 2014, and (B) Ontario during 2010 to 2012. (A) Maximum Clade Credibility tree of global RSV-A ON1 G-gene sequences constructed by the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method34. The tree is annotated with midpoint rooting using Figtree (http://tree.bio.ed.ac.uk/software/figtree/). A possible new emerging lineage (cluster) is identified with a black arrow. Light grey shaded bars represent the 95% Bayesian Credible Interval (BCI). (B) ON1 sequences collected during the previous Ontario study (2010–2011 season) are marked with a blue diamond. The red diamond indicates the identifier for each lineage. A possible new emerging lineage is identified with black arrow. Multiple sequences alignment and phylogenetic trees were constructed using Clustal W and neighbour-joining algorithm using the Maximum Composite Likelihood (MCL) approach running within MEGA 6.0 software53. Tree topology was supported by bootstrap analysis with 1000 pseudo replicate datasets. Bootstrap values greater than 70 are shown at the branch nodes.
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f3: (A) Circulating lineages of RSV-A ON1 genotype globally during 2010 to 2014, and (B) Ontario during 2010 to 2012. (A) Maximum Clade Credibility tree of global RSV-A ON1 G-gene sequences constructed by the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method34. The tree is annotated with midpoint rooting using Figtree (http://tree.bio.ed.ac.uk/software/figtree/). A possible new emerging lineage (cluster) is identified with a black arrow. Light grey shaded bars represent the 95% Bayesian Credible Interval (BCI). (B) ON1 sequences collected during the previous Ontario study (2010–2011 season) are marked with a blue diamond. The red diamond indicates the identifier for each lineage. A possible new emerging lineage is identified with black arrow. Multiple sequences alignment and phylogenetic trees were constructed using Clustal W and neighbour-joining algorithm using the Maximum Composite Likelihood (MCL) approach running within MEGA 6.0 software53. Tree topology was supported by bootstrap analysis with 1000 pseudo replicate datasets. Bootstrap values greater than 70 are shown at the branch nodes.

Mentions: The Maximum Clade Credibility (MCC) tree revealed three different RSV-A ON1 lineages circulating globally, indicated as ON1 (1.1), ON1 (1.2), ON1 (1.3), and the recently reported genotype, ON2 (Fig. 3A)12. Figure 2C describes the circulating lineages by country. All three global lineages, ON1 (1.1), ON1 (1.2), ON1 (1.3) are co-circulating in seven (Canada, Cuba, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain and U.S.A) of the 20 countries that have reported ON1 to date. ON1 (1.1) and ON1 (1.3) are co-circulating in Croatia, India, and Kenya; and ON1 (1.1) and ON1 (1.2) are co-circulating in Panama and Paraguay while the remaining eight countries only documented ON1 (1.1) circulation. Based on its genetic divergence (p-distance 0.0072), RSV-A ON2, recently identified by Hirano et al. (2014), is currently emerging in Italy12.


Genetic diversity and evolutionary insights of respiratory syncytial virus A ON1 genotype: global and local transmission dynamics.

Duvvuri VR, Granados A, Rosenfeld P, Bahl J, Eshaghi A, Gubbay JB - Sci Rep (2015)

(A) Circulating lineages of RSV-A ON1 genotype globally during 2010 to 2014, and (B) Ontario during 2010 to 2012. (A) Maximum Clade Credibility tree of global RSV-A ON1 G-gene sequences constructed by the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method34. The tree is annotated with midpoint rooting using Figtree (http://tree.bio.ed.ac.uk/software/figtree/). A possible new emerging lineage (cluster) is identified with a black arrow. Light grey shaded bars represent the 95% Bayesian Credible Interval (BCI). (B) ON1 sequences collected during the previous Ontario study (2010–2011 season) are marked with a blue diamond. The red diamond indicates the identifier for each lineage. A possible new emerging lineage is identified with black arrow. Multiple sequences alignment and phylogenetic trees were constructed using Clustal W and neighbour-joining algorithm using the Maximum Composite Likelihood (MCL) approach running within MEGA 6.0 software53. Tree topology was supported by bootstrap analysis with 1000 pseudo replicate datasets. Bootstrap values greater than 70 are shown at the branch nodes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588507&req=5

f3: (A) Circulating lineages of RSV-A ON1 genotype globally during 2010 to 2014, and (B) Ontario during 2010 to 2012. (A) Maximum Clade Credibility tree of global RSV-A ON1 G-gene sequences constructed by the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method34. The tree is annotated with midpoint rooting using Figtree (http://tree.bio.ed.ac.uk/software/figtree/). A possible new emerging lineage (cluster) is identified with a black arrow. Light grey shaded bars represent the 95% Bayesian Credible Interval (BCI). (B) ON1 sequences collected during the previous Ontario study (2010–2011 season) are marked with a blue diamond. The red diamond indicates the identifier for each lineage. A possible new emerging lineage is identified with black arrow. Multiple sequences alignment and phylogenetic trees were constructed using Clustal W and neighbour-joining algorithm using the Maximum Composite Likelihood (MCL) approach running within MEGA 6.0 software53. Tree topology was supported by bootstrap analysis with 1000 pseudo replicate datasets. Bootstrap values greater than 70 are shown at the branch nodes.
Mentions: The Maximum Clade Credibility (MCC) tree revealed three different RSV-A ON1 lineages circulating globally, indicated as ON1 (1.1), ON1 (1.2), ON1 (1.3), and the recently reported genotype, ON2 (Fig. 3A)12. Figure 2C describes the circulating lineages by country. All three global lineages, ON1 (1.1), ON1 (1.2), ON1 (1.3) are co-circulating in seven (Canada, Cuba, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain and U.S.A) of the 20 countries that have reported ON1 to date. ON1 (1.1) and ON1 (1.3) are co-circulating in Croatia, India, and Kenya; and ON1 (1.1) and ON1 (1.2) are co-circulating in Panama and Paraguay while the remaining eight countries only documented ON1 (1.1) circulation. Based on its genetic divergence (p-distance 0.0072), RSV-A ON2, recently identified by Hirano et al. (2014), is currently emerging in Italy12.

Bottom Line: Mean evolutionary rate of the global ON1 was 4.10 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year (95% BCI 3.1-5.0 × 10(-3)), not significantly different to that of Ontario ON1.The estimated mean reproductive number (R0 = ∼ 1.01) from global and Ontario sequences showed no significant difference and implies stability among global RSV-A ON1.These findings underscore the importance of continual molecular surveillance of RSV in order to gain a better understanding of epidemics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) A ON1 genotype, first detected in 2010 in Ontario, Canada, has been documented in 21 countries to date. This study investigated persistence and transmission dynamics of ON1 by grouping 406 randomly selected RSV-positive specimens submitted to Public Health Ontario from August 2011 to August 2012; RSV-A-positive specimens were genotyped. We identified 370 RSV-A (181 NA1, 135 NA2, 51 ON1 3 GA5) and 36 RSV-B positive specimens. We aligned time-stamped second hypervariable region (330 bp) of G-gene sequence data (global, n = 483; and Ontario, n = 60) to evaluate transmission dynamics. Global data suggests that the most recent common ancestor of ON1 emerged during the 2008-2009 season. Mean evolutionary rate of the global ON1 was 4.10 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year (95% BCI 3.1-5.0 × 10(-3)), not significantly different to that of Ontario ON1. The estimated mean reproductive number (R0 = ∼ 1.01) from global and Ontario sequences showed no significant difference and implies stability among global RSV-A ON1. This study suggests that local epidemics exhibit similar underlying evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics to that of the persistent global RSV-A ON1 population. These findings underscore the importance of continual molecular surveillance of RSV in order to gain a better understanding of epidemics.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus