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Ultrafast Fabrication of Flexible Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells by Ultrasonic Spray-Coating Technology.

Han HG, Weerasinghe HC, Min Kim K, Soo Kim J, Cheng YB, Jones DJ, Holmes AB, Kwon TH - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: This study investigates novel deposition techniques for the preparation of TiO2 electrodes for use in flexible dye-sensitized solar cells.These proposed new methods, namely pre-dye-coating and codeposition ultrasonic spraying, eliminate the conventional need for time-consuming processes such as dye soaking and high-temperature sintering.Power conversion efficiencies of over 4.0% were achieved with electrodes prepared on flexible polymer substrates using this new deposition technology and N719 dye as a sensitizer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, School of Natural Science, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan, 689-798, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study investigates novel deposition techniques for the preparation of TiO2 electrodes for use in flexible dye-sensitized solar cells. These proposed new methods, namely pre-dye-coating and codeposition ultrasonic spraying, eliminate the conventional need for time-consuming processes such as dye soaking and high-temperature sintering. Power conversion efficiencies of over 4.0% were achieved with electrodes prepared on flexible polymer substrates using this new deposition technology and N719 dye as a sensitizer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

FT-IR and Raman spectrum of N719 adsorbed on TiO2 electrodes prepared by conventional soaking (black) or codeposition (blue) and pre-dye-coating (red) processes, and then subjected to CIP compression for.
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f5: FT-IR and Raman spectrum of N719 adsorbed on TiO2 electrodes prepared by conventional soaking (black) or codeposition (blue) and pre-dye-coating (red) processes, and then subjected to CIP compression for.

Mentions: The notion of whether these newly developed ultrafast fabrication processes for dye-coated TiO2 electrodes produce a chemical adsorption comparable to the conventional soaking process was investigated, as the binding mode of the dye molecules plays an important role in ensuring that excited electrons are efficiently injected from the dye molecule into the TiO2 particles. Specifically, there are three different binding modes that can possibly exist when the carboxylate group of a dye coordinates to a TiO2 surface: a unidentate mode, a chelating mode, and a bridging bidentate mode14. Note that it is the latter of these that is preferred if the aim is to a high quantum yield for electron injection into the TiO2 Fermi level. The binding mode associated with dye adsorption on a TiO2 surface can be determined by calculating the frequency separation between the asymmetric and symmetric stretching modes of the carboxylate unit through resonance Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis14. This method was applied to the dye-coated TiO2 electrodes prepared by conventional soaking, pre-dye-coating and codeposition processes, and the FT-IR spectra obtained are shown in Fig. 5(a). From this, we can see that asymmetric and symmetric stretching bands appear at 1603 cm−1 and 1376 cm−1, respectively, for the carboxylate of the N719 dye adsorbed on the TiO2 surface prepared by conventional soaking, which corresponds to a bidentate mode. Similar FT-IR results were obtained for the N719 dye on the TiO2 surfaces prepared by pre-dye-coating (red) and spray codeposition (blue); however, the distinct peak evident at around 1720 cm−1 in the FT-IR spectrum of the dried N719 dye powder is notably absent1415. This indicates that N719 dye molecules are indeed chemically adsorbed on the TiO2 surface when pre-dye-coating or codeposition ultrasonic spray technology is applied. These dye-coated samples were further characterized using Raman spectroscopy, but again no distinguishable difference was observed in their spectra (Fig. 5(b)). Instead, all samples exhibited distinct peaks at 1260, 1475, 1542 and 1609 cm−1 that are attributed to vibrational modes of the 4,4′-dicarboxy-2,2′-bipyridine ligand15. On the basis of this, it is concluded that ultrasonic spray technology achieves a very similar binding mode of dye molecules on a TiO2 surface as conventional soaking15.


Ultrafast Fabrication of Flexible Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells by Ultrasonic Spray-Coating Technology.

Han HG, Weerasinghe HC, Min Kim K, Soo Kim J, Cheng YB, Jones DJ, Holmes AB, Kwon TH - Sci Rep (2015)

FT-IR and Raman spectrum of N719 adsorbed on TiO2 electrodes prepared by conventional soaking (black) or codeposition (blue) and pre-dye-coating (red) processes, and then subjected to CIP compression for.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588502&req=5

f5: FT-IR and Raman spectrum of N719 adsorbed on TiO2 electrodes prepared by conventional soaking (black) or codeposition (blue) and pre-dye-coating (red) processes, and then subjected to CIP compression for.
Mentions: The notion of whether these newly developed ultrafast fabrication processes for dye-coated TiO2 electrodes produce a chemical adsorption comparable to the conventional soaking process was investigated, as the binding mode of the dye molecules plays an important role in ensuring that excited electrons are efficiently injected from the dye molecule into the TiO2 particles. Specifically, there are three different binding modes that can possibly exist when the carboxylate group of a dye coordinates to a TiO2 surface: a unidentate mode, a chelating mode, and a bridging bidentate mode14. Note that it is the latter of these that is preferred if the aim is to a high quantum yield for electron injection into the TiO2 Fermi level. The binding mode associated with dye adsorption on a TiO2 surface can be determined by calculating the frequency separation between the asymmetric and symmetric stretching modes of the carboxylate unit through resonance Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis14. This method was applied to the dye-coated TiO2 electrodes prepared by conventional soaking, pre-dye-coating and codeposition processes, and the FT-IR spectra obtained are shown in Fig. 5(a). From this, we can see that asymmetric and symmetric stretching bands appear at 1603 cm−1 and 1376 cm−1, respectively, for the carboxylate of the N719 dye adsorbed on the TiO2 surface prepared by conventional soaking, which corresponds to a bidentate mode. Similar FT-IR results were obtained for the N719 dye on the TiO2 surfaces prepared by pre-dye-coating (red) and spray codeposition (blue); however, the distinct peak evident at around 1720 cm−1 in the FT-IR spectrum of the dried N719 dye powder is notably absent1415. This indicates that N719 dye molecules are indeed chemically adsorbed on the TiO2 surface when pre-dye-coating or codeposition ultrasonic spray technology is applied. These dye-coated samples were further characterized using Raman spectroscopy, but again no distinguishable difference was observed in their spectra (Fig. 5(b)). Instead, all samples exhibited distinct peaks at 1260, 1475, 1542 and 1609 cm−1 that are attributed to vibrational modes of the 4,4′-dicarboxy-2,2′-bipyridine ligand15. On the basis of this, it is concluded that ultrasonic spray technology achieves a very similar binding mode of dye molecules on a TiO2 surface as conventional soaking15.

Bottom Line: This study investigates novel deposition techniques for the preparation of TiO2 electrodes for use in flexible dye-sensitized solar cells.These proposed new methods, namely pre-dye-coating and codeposition ultrasonic spraying, eliminate the conventional need for time-consuming processes such as dye soaking and high-temperature sintering.Power conversion efficiencies of over 4.0% were achieved with electrodes prepared on flexible polymer substrates using this new deposition technology and N719 dye as a sensitizer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, School of Natural Science, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan, 689-798, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study investigates novel deposition techniques for the preparation of TiO2 electrodes for use in flexible dye-sensitized solar cells. These proposed new methods, namely pre-dye-coating and codeposition ultrasonic spraying, eliminate the conventional need for time-consuming processes such as dye soaking and high-temperature sintering. Power conversion efficiencies of over 4.0% were achieved with electrodes prepared on flexible polymer substrates using this new deposition technology and N719 dye as a sensitizer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus