Limits...
An evaluation study of a gender-specific smoking cessation program to help Hong Kong Chinese women quit smoking.

Li HC, Chan SS, Wan ZS, Wang MP, Lam TH - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The 7-day point prevalence quit rate was 28.4 % (130/457), and 21.9 % (100/457) had reduced their cigarette consumption by at least 50 % at the six-month follow-up.The average daily cigarette consumption was reduced from 8.3 at baseline to 6.3 at six months.Furthermore, helping smokers to improve their self-efficacy in resisting both internal and external stimuli of tobacco use can be a way of enhancing the effectiveness of a smoking cessation intervention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nursing, The University of Hong Kong, 4/F, William M. W. Mong Block, 21 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China. william3@hku.hk.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a lack of population-based smoking cessation interventions targeting woman smokers in Hong Kong, and in Asia generally. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a gender-specific smoking cessation program for female smokers in Hong Kong.

Methods: To evaluate the effectiveness of the service, a total of 457 eligible smokers were recruited. After the baseline questionnaire had been completed, a cessation counseling intervention was given by a trained counselor according to the stage of readiness to quit. Self-reported seven-day point prevalence of abstinence and reduction of cigarette consumption (≥50 %) and self-efficacy in rejecting tobacco were documented at one week and at two, three and six months.

Results: The 7-day point prevalence quit rate was 28.4 % (130/457), and 21.9 % (100/457) had reduced their cigarette consumption by at least 50 % at the six-month follow-up. The average daily cigarette consumption was reduced from 8.3 at baseline to 6.3 at six months. Moreover, both internal and external stimuli of anti-smoking self-efficacy increased from baseline to six months.

Conclusions: The study provides some evidence for the effectiveness of the gender-specific smoking cessation program for female smokers. Furthermore, helping smokers to improve their self-efficacy in resisting both internal and external stimuli of tobacco use can be a way of enhancing the effectiveness of a smoking cessation intervention.

No MeSH data available.


Flow chart of subject recruitment and retention rates
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588494&req=5

Fig1: Flow chart of subject recruitment and retention rates

Mentions: We received 895 phone calls, and a total of 457 eligible female smokers were recruited from November 2006 to March 2012. The recruitment and retention rates are shown in Fig. 1. The retention rates at follow-ups were 94.7 % (433/457) at one week, 89.5 % (409/457) at one month, 88.0 % (402/457) at three months and 82.3 % (376/457) at six months. A comparative analysis was performed to compare the demographic and baseline characteristics between those who completed and lost to follow-up at 6 month of the study. There were no statistically significant differences in any of the demographic and baseline data between those who completed the study and those who lost to follow-up at 6 month. Of the 457 subjects, 44.6 % (n = 204) chose face-to-face counseling at baseline, while 55.4 % (n = 253) elected telephone counseling.Fig. 1


An evaluation study of a gender-specific smoking cessation program to help Hong Kong Chinese women quit smoking.

Li HC, Chan SS, Wan ZS, Wang MP, Lam TH - BMC Public Health (2015)

Flow chart of subject recruitment and retention rates
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588494&req=5

Fig1: Flow chart of subject recruitment and retention rates
Mentions: We received 895 phone calls, and a total of 457 eligible female smokers were recruited from November 2006 to March 2012. The recruitment and retention rates are shown in Fig. 1. The retention rates at follow-ups were 94.7 % (433/457) at one week, 89.5 % (409/457) at one month, 88.0 % (402/457) at three months and 82.3 % (376/457) at six months. A comparative analysis was performed to compare the demographic and baseline characteristics between those who completed and lost to follow-up at 6 month of the study. There were no statistically significant differences in any of the demographic and baseline data between those who completed the study and those who lost to follow-up at 6 month. Of the 457 subjects, 44.6 % (n = 204) chose face-to-face counseling at baseline, while 55.4 % (n = 253) elected telephone counseling.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The 7-day point prevalence quit rate was 28.4 % (130/457), and 21.9 % (100/457) had reduced their cigarette consumption by at least 50 % at the six-month follow-up.The average daily cigarette consumption was reduced from 8.3 at baseline to 6.3 at six months.Furthermore, helping smokers to improve their self-efficacy in resisting both internal and external stimuli of tobacco use can be a way of enhancing the effectiveness of a smoking cessation intervention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nursing, The University of Hong Kong, 4/F, William M. W. Mong Block, 21 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China. william3@hku.hk.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a lack of population-based smoking cessation interventions targeting woman smokers in Hong Kong, and in Asia generally. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a gender-specific smoking cessation program for female smokers in Hong Kong.

Methods: To evaluate the effectiveness of the service, a total of 457 eligible smokers were recruited. After the baseline questionnaire had been completed, a cessation counseling intervention was given by a trained counselor according to the stage of readiness to quit. Self-reported seven-day point prevalence of abstinence and reduction of cigarette consumption (≥50 %) and self-efficacy in rejecting tobacco were documented at one week and at two, three and six months.

Results: The 7-day point prevalence quit rate was 28.4 % (130/457), and 21.9 % (100/457) had reduced their cigarette consumption by at least 50 % at the six-month follow-up. The average daily cigarette consumption was reduced from 8.3 at baseline to 6.3 at six months. Moreover, both internal and external stimuli of anti-smoking self-efficacy increased from baseline to six months.

Conclusions: The study provides some evidence for the effectiveness of the gender-specific smoking cessation program for female smokers. Furthermore, helping smokers to improve their self-efficacy in resisting both internal and external stimuli of tobacco use can be a way of enhancing the effectiveness of a smoking cessation intervention.

No MeSH data available.