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Body image and weight control in South Africans 15 years or older: SANHANES-1.

Mchiza ZJ, Parker WA, Makoae M, Sewpaul R, Kupamupindi T, Labadarios D - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Any differences in values were considered to be significantly different if the confidence intervals did not overlap.Body mass index appears to influence body image and weight adjustment in South Africa.South Africans at the extreme ends of the body mass index range have a largely distorted body image and are highly dissatisfied by it.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Population Health, Health Systems and Innovation (PHHSI), Human Sciences Research Council, Private Bag X9182, Cape Town, 8000 12th Floor, Plein Park Building, 69-83 Plein Street, Cape Town, 8001, South Africa. zmchiza@hsrc.ac.za.

ABSTRACT

Background: South African studies have suggested that differences in obesity prevalence between groups may be partly related to differences in body image and body size dissatisfaction. However, there has never been a national study that measured body image and its relationship to weight control in the country. Hence, the main aim of the study was to examine body image in relation to body mass index and weight control in South Africa.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey and a secondary analyses of data were undertaken for 6 411 South Africans (15+ years) participating in the first South African National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Body image was investigated in relation to weight status and attempts to lose or gain weight. Data were analysed using STATA version 11.0. Descriptive statistics are presented as counts (numbers), percentages, means, standard error of means, and 95 % confidence intervals. Any differences in values were considered to be significantly different if the confidence intervals did not overlap.

Results: Overall, 84.5 % participants had a largely distorted body image and 45.3 % were highly dissatisfied about their body size. Overweight and obese participants under estimated their body size and desired to be thinner. On the other hand, normal- and under-weight participants over estimated their body size and desired to be fatter. Only 12.1 and 10.1 % of participants attempted to lose or gain weight, respectively, mainly by adjusting dietary intake and physical activity.

Discussion: Body mass index appears to influence body image and weight adjustment in South Africa.

Conclusions: South Africans at the extreme ends of the body mass index range have a largely distorted body image and are highly dissatisfied by it. This suggests a need for health education and beneficial weight control strategies to halt the obesity epidemic in the country.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence of FID and BID index scores across BMI categories of South Africans aged 15 years and older who were respondents in the SANHANES-1 survey [24]
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Fig3: Prevalence of FID and BID index scores across BMI categories of South Africans aged 15 years and older who were respondents in the SANHANES-1 survey [24]

Mentions: The same described trend was evident when comparing the direction and degree of dissatisfaction and distortion across BMI categories (Fig. 3). In this regard, for both FID and BID the prevalence of participants who achieved negative index scores tended to decrease as BMI increased. Conversely, the prevalence of participants who achieved positive index scores tended to increase as BMI increased. This implies that the majority of participants who perceived themselves to be thinner wanted to be bigger, while those who perceived themselves as fatter wanted to be thinner. It should also be noted that in this figure, a significant number of participants (more than a third) of varying BMI categories obtained FID index scores that were equal to zero, suggesting that they were satisfied with their body size. Similarly, more than a fifth of normal weight and overweight participants obtained BID index scores that were equal to zero, suggesting that they could estimate their body size correctly.Fig. 3


Body image and weight control in South Africans 15 years or older: SANHANES-1.

Mchiza ZJ, Parker WA, Makoae M, Sewpaul R, Kupamupindi T, Labadarios D - BMC Public Health (2015)

Prevalence of FID and BID index scores across BMI categories of South Africans aged 15 years and older who were respondents in the SANHANES-1 survey [24]
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588465&req=5

Fig3: Prevalence of FID and BID index scores across BMI categories of South Africans aged 15 years and older who were respondents in the SANHANES-1 survey [24]
Mentions: The same described trend was evident when comparing the direction and degree of dissatisfaction and distortion across BMI categories (Fig. 3). In this regard, for both FID and BID the prevalence of participants who achieved negative index scores tended to decrease as BMI increased. Conversely, the prevalence of participants who achieved positive index scores tended to increase as BMI increased. This implies that the majority of participants who perceived themselves to be thinner wanted to be bigger, while those who perceived themselves as fatter wanted to be thinner. It should also be noted that in this figure, a significant number of participants (more than a third) of varying BMI categories obtained FID index scores that were equal to zero, suggesting that they were satisfied with their body size. Similarly, more than a fifth of normal weight and overweight participants obtained BID index scores that were equal to zero, suggesting that they could estimate their body size correctly.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Any differences in values were considered to be significantly different if the confidence intervals did not overlap.Body mass index appears to influence body image and weight adjustment in South Africa.South Africans at the extreme ends of the body mass index range have a largely distorted body image and are highly dissatisfied by it.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Population Health, Health Systems and Innovation (PHHSI), Human Sciences Research Council, Private Bag X9182, Cape Town, 8000 12th Floor, Plein Park Building, 69-83 Plein Street, Cape Town, 8001, South Africa. zmchiza@hsrc.ac.za.

ABSTRACT

Background: South African studies have suggested that differences in obesity prevalence between groups may be partly related to differences in body image and body size dissatisfaction. However, there has never been a national study that measured body image and its relationship to weight control in the country. Hence, the main aim of the study was to examine body image in relation to body mass index and weight control in South Africa.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey and a secondary analyses of data were undertaken for 6 411 South Africans (15+ years) participating in the first South African National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Body image was investigated in relation to weight status and attempts to lose or gain weight. Data were analysed using STATA version 11.0. Descriptive statistics are presented as counts (numbers), percentages, means, standard error of means, and 95 % confidence intervals. Any differences in values were considered to be significantly different if the confidence intervals did not overlap.

Results: Overall, 84.5 % participants had a largely distorted body image and 45.3 % were highly dissatisfied about their body size. Overweight and obese participants under estimated their body size and desired to be thinner. On the other hand, normal- and under-weight participants over estimated their body size and desired to be fatter. Only 12.1 and 10.1 % of participants attempted to lose or gain weight, respectively, mainly by adjusting dietary intake and physical activity.

Discussion: Body mass index appears to influence body image and weight adjustment in South Africa.

Conclusions: South Africans at the extreme ends of the body mass index range have a largely distorted body image and are highly dissatisfied by it. This suggests a need for health education and beneficial weight control strategies to halt the obesity epidemic in the country.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus