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Enteric Bacteria Isolated from Diarrheal Patients in Korea in 2014.

Kim NO, Jung SM, Na HY, Chung GT, Yoo CK, Seong WK, Hong S - Osong Public Health Res Perspect (2015)

Bottom Line: For isolation rate by region, 56.2% were isolated from cities and 43.8% were isolated from provinces.Hygiene education should be addressed for diarrheal disease-susceptible groups, such as those younger than 10 years, aged 10-19 years, and older than 70 years, and monitoring for the pathogens is still required.In addition, an efficient laboratory surveillance system for infection control should be continued.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Enteric Diseases, Center for Infectious Diseases, Korea National Institute of Health, Cheongju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The aim of this study was to characterize the pathogens responsible for causing diarrhea according to season, region of isolation, patient age, and sex as well as to provide useful data for the prevention of diarrheal disease.

Methods: Stool specimens from 14,886 patients with diarrhea were collected to identify pathogenic bacteria from January 2014 to December 2014 in Korea. A total of 3,526 pathogenic bacteria were isolated and analyzed according to season, region of isolation, and the age and sex of the patient.

Results: The breakdown of the isolated pathogenic bacteria were as follows: Salmonella spp. 476 (13.5%), pathogenic Escherichia coli 777 (22.0%), Vibrio parahaemolyticus 26 (0.74%), Shigella spp. 13 (0.37%), Campylobacter spp. 215 (6.10%), Clostridium perfringens 508 (14.4%), Staphylococcus aureus 1,144 (32.4%), Bacillus cereus 356 (10.1%), Listeria monocytogenes 1 (0.03%), and Yersinia enterocolitica 10 (0.3%). The isolation rate trend showed the highest ratio in the summer season from June to September for most of the pathogenic bacteria except the Gram-positive bacteria. The isolation rate of most of the pathogenic bacteria by patient age showed highest ratio in the 0-19 year age range. For isolation rate by region, 56.2% were isolated from cities and 43.8% were isolated from provinces.

Conclusion: Hygiene education should be addressed for diarrheal disease-susceptible groups, such as those younger than 10 years, aged 10-19 years, and older than 70 years, and monitoring for the pathogens is still required. In addition, an efficient laboratory surveillance system for infection control should be continued.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Seasonal isolation rate patterns. (A) Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and (B) Gram-positive bacterial pathogens are shown.
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fig1: Seasonal isolation rate patterns. (A) Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and (B) Gram-positive bacterial pathogens are shown.

Mentions: We analyzed the pathogenic bacteria isolation rate by month (from January to December). An average isolation rate of 10 pathogenic bacteria gradually increased from May and was highest in August at 36.29% (summer) and decreased to the lowest rate of 16.53% by April (spring; Table 1 and Fig. 1). Among the 10 pathogenic bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, Salmonella spp., pathogenic E. coli, and Campylobacter spp., showed an increasing pattern by temperature, which increased from May and was highest from June to July. Salmonella spp., pathogenic E. coli, Campylobacter spp., showed the highest prevalence in July. Interestingly, Shigella spp. was isolated mostly in the winter season in November and December (Table 1 and Fig. 1A). However, with Gram-positive bacteria, C. perfringens and S. aureus, the average isolation rate tended to be even throughout the year. Only B. cereus showed a similar trend to that of the Gram-negative bacteria, specifically the pathogenic E. coli (Table 1 and Fig. 1B).


Enteric Bacteria Isolated from Diarrheal Patients in Korea in 2014.

Kim NO, Jung SM, Na HY, Chung GT, Yoo CK, Seong WK, Hong S - Osong Public Health Res Perspect (2015)

Seasonal isolation rate patterns. (A) Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and (B) Gram-positive bacterial pathogens are shown.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588440&req=5

fig1: Seasonal isolation rate patterns. (A) Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and (B) Gram-positive bacterial pathogens are shown.
Mentions: We analyzed the pathogenic bacteria isolation rate by month (from January to December). An average isolation rate of 10 pathogenic bacteria gradually increased from May and was highest in August at 36.29% (summer) and decreased to the lowest rate of 16.53% by April (spring; Table 1 and Fig. 1). Among the 10 pathogenic bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, Salmonella spp., pathogenic E. coli, and Campylobacter spp., showed an increasing pattern by temperature, which increased from May and was highest from June to July. Salmonella spp., pathogenic E. coli, Campylobacter spp., showed the highest prevalence in July. Interestingly, Shigella spp. was isolated mostly in the winter season in November and December (Table 1 and Fig. 1A). However, with Gram-positive bacteria, C. perfringens and S. aureus, the average isolation rate tended to be even throughout the year. Only B. cereus showed a similar trend to that of the Gram-negative bacteria, specifically the pathogenic E. coli (Table 1 and Fig. 1B).

Bottom Line: For isolation rate by region, 56.2% were isolated from cities and 43.8% were isolated from provinces.Hygiene education should be addressed for diarrheal disease-susceptible groups, such as those younger than 10 years, aged 10-19 years, and older than 70 years, and monitoring for the pathogens is still required.In addition, an efficient laboratory surveillance system for infection control should be continued.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Enteric Diseases, Center for Infectious Diseases, Korea National Institute of Health, Cheongju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The aim of this study was to characterize the pathogens responsible for causing diarrhea according to season, region of isolation, patient age, and sex as well as to provide useful data for the prevention of diarrheal disease.

Methods: Stool specimens from 14,886 patients with diarrhea were collected to identify pathogenic bacteria from January 2014 to December 2014 in Korea. A total of 3,526 pathogenic bacteria were isolated and analyzed according to season, region of isolation, and the age and sex of the patient.

Results: The breakdown of the isolated pathogenic bacteria were as follows: Salmonella spp. 476 (13.5%), pathogenic Escherichia coli 777 (22.0%), Vibrio parahaemolyticus 26 (0.74%), Shigella spp. 13 (0.37%), Campylobacter spp. 215 (6.10%), Clostridium perfringens 508 (14.4%), Staphylococcus aureus 1,144 (32.4%), Bacillus cereus 356 (10.1%), Listeria monocytogenes 1 (0.03%), and Yersinia enterocolitica 10 (0.3%). The isolation rate trend showed the highest ratio in the summer season from June to September for most of the pathogenic bacteria except the Gram-positive bacteria. The isolation rate of most of the pathogenic bacteria by patient age showed highest ratio in the 0-19 year age range. For isolation rate by region, 56.2% were isolated from cities and 43.8% were isolated from provinces.

Conclusion: Hygiene education should be addressed for diarrheal disease-susceptible groups, such as those younger than 10 years, aged 10-19 years, and older than 70 years, and monitoring for the pathogens is still required. In addition, an efficient laboratory surveillance system for infection control should be continued.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus