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Factoring the brain signatures of anesthesia concentration and level of arousal across individuals.

Barttfeld P, Bekinschtein TA, Salles A, Stamatakis EA, Adapa R, Menon DK, Sigman M - Neuroimage Clin (2015)

Bottom Line: Combining resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) connectivity and behavioral analysis during sedation, we factored out general effects of the anesthetic drug propofol and a specific index of conscious report, participants' level of responsiveness.The factorial analysis shows that increasing concentration of propofol in blood specifically decreases the connectivity strength of fronto-parietal cortical loops.In contrast, loss of responsiveness is indexed by a functional disconnection between the thalamus and the frontal cortex, balanced by an increase in connectivity strength of the thalamus to the occipital and temporal regions of the cortex.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidad Torcuato di Tella, Almirante Juan Saenz Valiente 1010, Buenos Aires C1428BIJ, Argentina ; Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, CEA DSV/I2BM, INSERM, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, NeuroSpin center, 91191 Gif/Yvette, France.

ABSTRACT
Combining resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) connectivity and behavioral analysis during sedation, we factored out general effects of the anesthetic drug propofol and a specific index of conscious report, participants' level of responsiveness. The factorial analysis shows that increasing concentration of propofol in blood specifically decreases the connectivity strength of fronto-parietal cortical loops. In contrast, loss of responsiveness is indexed by a functional disconnection between the thalamus and the frontal cortex, balanced by an increase in connectivity strength of the thalamus to the occipital and temporal regions of the cortex.

No MeSH data available.


a–c) ROIs whose connectivity significantly changed with propofol (a, b) and number of missed responses (c). Each ROI is linked to all other ROIs, a blue line represents negative β-values, red lines represent positive β-values. d–f) Average β between ROIs posterior parietal (d), occipital (e) and Right thalamus (f) with all other functional systems, for the significant regressor. S.E.M. represents standard error of the mean.
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f0010: a–c) ROIs whose connectivity significantly changed with propofol (a, b) and number of missed responses (c). Each ROI is linked to all other ROIs, a blue line represents negative β-values, red lines represent positive β-values. d–f) Average β between ROIs posterior parietal (d), occipital (e) and Right thalamus (f) with all other functional systems, for the significant regressor. S.E.M. represents standard error of the mean.

Mentions: To construct Fig. 2d–f we searched for significant br,j values. Since br,j values approximate a Gaussian distribution, we normalized each br,j valuezr,j=br,j−mean(br,j)std(br,j)and obtained the corresponding pr,j to each zr,j, that is, the cumulated probability in the normalized Gaussian distribution at zr,j. We identified those ROIs whose connectivity is selectively affected by one regressor and not the other, that is whose ppropofol is significant and whose pbehavior is not, and vice-versa.


Factoring the brain signatures of anesthesia concentration and level of arousal across individuals.

Barttfeld P, Bekinschtein TA, Salles A, Stamatakis EA, Adapa R, Menon DK, Sigman M - Neuroimage Clin (2015)

a–c) ROIs whose connectivity significantly changed with propofol (a, b) and number of missed responses (c). Each ROI is linked to all other ROIs, a blue line represents negative β-values, red lines represent positive β-values. d–f) Average β between ROIs posterior parietal (d), occipital (e) and Right thalamus (f) with all other functional systems, for the significant regressor. S.E.M. represents standard error of the mean.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588413&req=5

f0010: a–c) ROIs whose connectivity significantly changed with propofol (a, b) and number of missed responses (c). Each ROI is linked to all other ROIs, a blue line represents negative β-values, red lines represent positive β-values. d–f) Average β between ROIs posterior parietal (d), occipital (e) and Right thalamus (f) with all other functional systems, for the significant regressor. S.E.M. represents standard error of the mean.
Mentions: To construct Fig. 2d–f we searched for significant br,j values. Since br,j values approximate a Gaussian distribution, we normalized each br,j valuezr,j=br,j−mean(br,j)std(br,j)and obtained the corresponding pr,j to each zr,j, that is, the cumulated probability in the normalized Gaussian distribution at zr,j. We identified those ROIs whose connectivity is selectively affected by one regressor and not the other, that is whose ppropofol is significant and whose pbehavior is not, and vice-versa.

Bottom Line: Combining resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) connectivity and behavioral analysis during sedation, we factored out general effects of the anesthetic drug propofol and a specific index of conscious report, participants' level of responsiveness.The factorial analysis shows that increasing concentration of propofol in blood specifically decreases the connectivity strength of fronto-parietal cortical loops.In contrast, loss of responsiveness is indexed by a functional disconnection between the thalamus and the frontal cortex, balanced by an increase in connectivity strength of the thalamus to the occipital and temporal regions of the cortex.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidad Torcuato di Tella, Almirante Juan Saenz Valiente 1010, Buenos Aires C1428BIJ, Argentina ; Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, CEA DSV/I2BM, INSERM, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, NeuroSpin center, 91191 Gif/Yvette, France.

ABSTRACT
Combining resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) connectivity and behavioral analysis during sedation, we factored out general effects of the anesthetic drug propofol and a specific index of conscious report, participants' level of responsiveness. The factorial analysis shows that increasing concentration of propofol in blood specifically decreases the connectivity strength of fronto-parietal cortical loops. In contrast, loss of responsiveness is indexed by a functional disconnection between the thalamus and the frontal cortex, balanced by an increase in connectivity strength of the thalamus to the occipital and temporal regions of the cortex.

No MeSH data available.