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Serum adiponectin concentration in 2,939 Japanese men undergoing screening for prostate cancer.

Ikeda A, Nakagawa T, Kawai K, Onozawa M, Hayashi T, Matsushita Y, Tsutsumi M, Kojima T, Miyazaki J, Nishiyama H - Prostate Int (2015)

Bottom Line: The adiponectin levels were significantly and negatively correlated with BMI (r =  -0.260, P < 0.0001).However, a significant and positive correlation was observed between adiponectin levels and PSA levels (r = 0.054, P = 0.0061).There was a significant positive correlation between adiponectin levels and PSA levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Hitachi General Hospital, Ibaraki, Japan ; Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent investigations suggest that serum adiponectin levels are negatively associated with the development of aggressive prostate cancer, however, not all epigenetic studies support the inverse association.

Methods: We analyzed serum adiponectin levels, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, and outcomes of prostate cancer screening of 2,939 participants of a PSA-based screening program conducted by a single institute in Japan.

Results: The median body mass index (BMI) of the participants was 23.9 kg/m(2), and 31% had a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2). The adiponectin levels were significantly and negatively correlated with BMI (r =  -0.260, P < 0.0001). However, a significant and positive correlation was observed between adiponectin levels and PSA levels (r = 0.054, P = 0.0061). After screening, 24 (0.82%) patients were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Interestingly, the adiponectin levels of the 24 prostate cancer patients (average 9.86 μg/mL) were significantly higher than those of the 2,817 participants with PSA levels < 4 ng/mL (average 7.63 μg/mL) (P = 0.0049). However, when restricted to the eight high-risk prostate cancer patients, the adiponectin levels did not differ from those of the participants with PSA levels < 4 ng/mL. The age-adjusted cancer detection rate of the participants was calculated by stratifying the BMI (cut-off level 25 kg/m(2)) and adiponectin levels (cut-off level 6.7 μg/mL). The cancer detection rate in the high-BMI and high-adiponectin group was 1.67%, which was the highest among all groups.

Conclusions: There was a significant positive correlation between adiponectin levels and PSA levels. The present findings also suggest that the incidence of low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer might be increased in overweight men with high serum adiponectin levels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Graphs showing the adiponectin (APN) level was negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI) but positively correlated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. (A) Correlations between APN level and BMI. (B) Correlations between APN levels and PSA levels among all participants (n = 2,939).
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fig1: Graphs showing the adiponectin (APN) level was negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI) but positively correlated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. (A) Correlations between APN level and BMI. (B) Correlations between APN levels and PSA levels among all participants (n = 2,939).

Mentions: Fig. 1 represents the correlations between APN levels and BMI and between APN levels and PSA levels among all participants. The APN level was significantly and negatively correlated with BMI (r = −0.260, P < 0.0001; Fig. 1A). However, a significant and positive correlation was observed between APN levels and PSA levels (r = 0.054, P = 0.0061), as shown in Fig. 1B. When the participants were divided by the PSA cut-off level, the difference was significant (P = 0.0031): the mean APN levels of the participants with PSA levels ≥ 4 ng/mL and of those with PSA levels < 4 ng/mL were 8.70 μg/mL and 7.61 μg/mL, respectively. The significantly higher APN levels were observed even when participants were stratified by BMI with the cut-off level of 25 kg/m2.


Serum adiponectin concentration in 2,939 Japanese men undergoing screening for prostate cancer.

Ikeda A, Nakagawa T, Kawai K, Onozawa M, Hayashi T, Matsushita Y, Tsutsumi M, Kojima T, Miyazaki J, Nishiyama H - Prostate Int (2015)

Graphs showing the adiponectin (APN) level was negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI) but positively correlated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. (A) Correlations between APN level and BMI. (B) Correlations between APN levels and PSA levels among all participants (n = 2,939).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4588391&req=5

fig1: Graphs showing the adiponectin (APN) level was negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI) but positively correlated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. (A) Correlations between APN level and BMI. (B) Correlations between APN levels and PSA levels among all participants (n = 2,939).
Mentions: Fig. 1 represents the correlations between APN levels and BMI and between APN levels and PSA levels among all participants. The APN level was significantly and negatively correlated with BMI (r = −0.260, P < 0.0001; Fig. 1A). However, a significant and positive correlation was observed between APN levels and PSA levels (r = 0.054, P = 0.0061), as shown in Fig. 1B. When the participants were divided by the PSA cut-off level, the difference was significant (P = 0.0031): the mean APN levels of the participants with PSA levels ≥ 4 ng/mL and of those with PSA levels < 4 ng/mL were 8.70 μg/mL and 7.61 μg/mL, respectively. The significantly higher APN levels were observed even when participants were stratified by BMI with the cut-off level of 25 kg/m2.

Bottom Line: The adiponectin levels were significantly and negatively correlated with BMI (r =  -0.260, P < 0.0001).However, a significant and positive correlation was observed between adiponectin levels and PSA levels (r = 0.054, P = 0.0061).There was a significant positive correlation between adiponectin levels and PSA levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Hitachi General Hospital, Ibaraki, Japan ; Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent investigations suggest that serum adiponectin levels are negatively associated with the development of aggressive prostate cancer, however, not all epigenetic studies support the inverse association.

Methods: We analyzed serum adiponectin levels, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, and outcomes of prostate cancer screening of 2,939 participants of a PSA-based screening program conducted by a single institute in Japan.

Results: The median body mass index (BMI) of the participants was 23.9 kg/m(2), and 31% had a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2). The adiponectin levels were significantly and negatively correlated with BMI (r =  -0.260, P < 0.0001). However, a significant and positive correlation was observed between adiponectin levels and PSA levels (r = 0.054, P = 0.0061). After screening, 24 (0.82%) patients were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Interestingly, the adiponectin levels of the 24 prostate cancer patients (average 9.86 μg/mL) were significantly higher than those of the 2,817 participants with PSA levels < 4 ng/mL (average 7.63 μg/mL) (P = 0.0049). However, when restricted to the eight high-risk prostate cancer patients, the adiponectin levels did not differ from those of the participants with PSA levels < 4 ng/mL. The age-adjusted cancer detection rate of the participants was calculated by stratifying the BMI (cut-off level 25 kg/m(2)) and adiponectin levels (cut-off level 6.7 μg/mL). The cancer detection rate in the high-BMI and high-adiponectin group was 1.67%, which was the highest among all groups.

Conclusions: There was a significant positive correlation between adiponectin levels and PSA levels. The present findings also suggest that the incidence of low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer might be increased in overweight men with high serum adiponectin levels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus