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Maternal and paternal support for physical activity and healthy eating in preschool children: a cross-sectional study.

Schoeppe S, Trost SG - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: This study evaluated the singular and combined effects of maternal and paternal support for physical activity (PA) and fruit and vegetable consumption (FV) on preschoolers' PA and FV.Maternal and paternal support for PA were positively associated with child PA (r = 0.37 and r = 0.36, respectively; P < 0.001).Maternal but not paternal support for FV was positively associated with child FV (r = 0.35; P < 0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Children's Health Research, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, 62 Graham Street, South Brisbane, QLD, 4101, Australia. s.schoeppe@cqu.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Parental support is a key influence on children's health behaviours; however, no previous investigation has simultaneously explored the influence of mothers' and fathers' social support on eating and physical activity in preschool-aged children. This study evaluated the singular and combined effects of maternal and paternal support for physical activity (PA) and fruit and vegetable consumption (FV) on preschoolers' PA and FV.

Methods: A random sample comprising 173 parent-child dyads completed validated scales assessing maternal and paternal instrumental support and child PA and FV behaviour. Pearson correlations, controlling for child age, parental age, and parental education, were used to evaluate relationships between maternal and paternal support and child PA and FV. K-means cluster analysis was used to identify families with distinct patterns of maternal and paternal support for PA and FV, and one-way ANOVA examined the impact of cluster membership on child PA and FV.

Results: Maternal and paternal support for PA were positively associated with child PA (r = 0.37 and r = 0.36, respectively; P < 0.001). Maternal but not paternal support for FV was positively associated with child FV (r = 0.35; P < 0.001). Five clusters characterised groups of families with distinct configurations of maternal and paternal support for PA and FV: 1) above average maternal and paternal support for PA and FV, 2) below average maternal and paternal support for PA and FV, 3) above average maternal and paternal support for PA but below average maternal and paternal support for FV, 4) above average maternal and paternal support for FV but below average maternal and paternal support for PA, and 5) above average maternal support but below average paternal support for PA and FV. Children from families with above average maternal and paternal support for both health behaviours had higher PA and FV levels than children from families with above average support for just one health behaviour, or below average support for both behaviours.

Conclusions: The level and consistency of instrumental support from mothers and fathers for PA and FV may be an important target for obesity prevention in preschool-aged children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Final cluster centroids for maternal and paternal support for physical activity (PA), and fruit and vegetable consumption (FV). Abbreviations: MSUP_PA = maternal support for physical activity, PSUP_PA = paternal support for physical activity, MSUP_FV = maternal support for fruit and vegetable consumption, PSUP_FV = paternal support for fruit and vegetable consumption
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Fig1: Final cluster centroids for maternal and paternal support for physical activity (PA), and fruit and vegetable consumption (FV). Abbreviations: MSUP_PA = maternal support for physical activity, PSUP_PA = paternal support for physical activity, MSUP_FV = maternal support for fruit and vegetable consumption, PSUP_FV = paternal support for fruit and vegetable consumption

Mentions: After list-wise deletions for missing maternal or paternal support and/or child health behaviour data, the effective sample size for the cluster analysis was N = 128. Five clusters best categorised the data; these clusters remained stable in the K-means iterative clustering procedure, and accounted for 61- 69 % of variance in the parental support variables. The final solution for the cluster centroids are shown in Fig. 1. The first cluster was characterised by above average maternal and paternal support for both PA and FV (N = 35). The second cluster was characterised by below average maternal and paternal support for both PA and FV (N = 26). The third cluster was characterised by above average maternal and paternal support for PA, but below average maternal and paternal support for FV (N = 23). The fourth cluster was characterised by above average maternal and paternal support for FV, but below average maternal and paternal support for PA (N = 22). The fifth cluster was characterised by discordant maternal and paternal support, where mothers’ support for PA and FV was above average and fathers’ support for PA and FV was below average (N = 22).Fig. 1


Maternal and paternal support for physical activity and healthy eating in preschool children: a cross-sectional study.

Schoeppe S, Trost SG - BMC Public Health (2015)

Final cluster centroids for maternal and paternal support for physical activity (PA), and fruit and vegetable consumption (FV). Abbreviations: MSUP_PA = maternal support for physical activity, PSUP_PA = paternal support for physical activity, MSUP_FV = maternal support for fruit and vegetable consumption, PSUP_FV = paternal support for fruit and vegetable consumption
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4587864&req=5

Fig1: Final cluster centroids for maternal and paternal support for physical activity (PA), and fruit and vegetable consumption (FV). Abbreviations: MSUP_PA = maternal support for physical activity, PSUP_PA = paternal support for physical activity, MSUP_FV = maternal support for fruit and vegetable consumption, PSUP_FV = paternal support for fruit and vegetable consumption
Mentions: After list-wise deletions for missing maternal or paternal support and/or child health behaviour data, the effective sample size for the cluster analysis was N = 128. Five clusters best categorised the data; these clusters remained stable in the K-means iterative clustering procedure, and accounted for 61- 69 % of variance in the parental support variables. The final solution for the cluster centroids are shown in Fig. 1. The first cluster was characterised by above average maternal and paternal support for both PA and FV (N = 35). The second cluster was characterised by below average maternal and paternal support for both PA and FV (N = 26). The third cluster was characterised by above average maternal and paternal support for PA, but below average maternal and paternal support for FV (N = 23). The fourth cluster was characterised by above average maternal and paternal support for FV, but below average maternal and paternal support for PA (N = 22). The fifth cluster was characterised by discordant maternal and paternal support, where mothers’ support for PA and FV was above average and fathers’ support for PA and FV was below average (N = 22).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: This study evaluated the singular and combined effects of maternal and paternal support for physical activity (PA) and fruit and vegetable consumption (FV) on preschoolers' PA and FV.Maternal and paternal support for PA were positively associated with child PA (r = 0.37 and r = 0.36, respectively; P < 0.001).Maternal but not paternal support for FV was positively associated with child FV (r = 0.35; P < 0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Children's Health Research, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, 62 Graham Street, South Brisbane, QLD, 4101, Australia. s.schoeppe@cqu.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Parental support is a key influence on children's health behaviours; however, no previous investigation has simultaneously explored the influence of mothers' and fathers' social support on eating and physical activity in preschool-aged children. This study evaluated the singular and combined effects of maternal and paternal support for physical activity (PA) and fruit and vegetable consumption (FV) on preschoolers' PA and FV.

Methods: A random sample comprising 173 parent-child dyads completed validated scales assessing maternal and paternal instrumental support and child PA and FV behaviour. Pearson correlations, controlling for child age, parental age, and parental education, were used to evaluate relationships between maternal and paternal support and child PA and FV. K-means cluster analysis was used to identify families with distinct patterns of maternal and paternal support for PA and FV, and one-way ANOVA examined the impact of cluster membership on child PA and FV.

Results: Maternal and paternal support for PA were positively associated with child PA (r = 0.37 and r = 0.36, respectively; P < 0.001). Maternal but not paternal support for FV was positively associated with child FV (r = 0.35; P < 0.001). Five clusters characterised groups of families with distinct configurations of maternal and paternal support for PA and FV: 1) above average maternal and paternal support for PA and FV, 2) below average maternal and paternal support for PA and FV, 3) above average maternal and paternal support for PA but below average maternal and paternal support for FV, 4) above average maternal and paternal support for FV but below average maternal and paternal support for PA, and 5) above average maternal support but below average paternal support for PA and FV. Children from families with above average maternal and paternal support for both health behaviours had higher PA and FV levels than children from families with above average support for just one health behaviour, or below average support for both behaviours.

Conclusions: The level and consistency of instrumental support from mothers and fathers for PA and FV may be an important target for obesity prevention in preschool-aged children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus