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Dynamic Data Visualization with Weave and Brain Choropleths.

Patterson D, Hicks T, Dufilie A, Grinstein G, Plante E - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We demonstrate that the simplified region-based analyses that underlay choropleths can provide insights into neuroimaging data comparable to those achieved by using more conventional methods.In addition, the interactive interface facilitates additional insights by allowing the user to filter, compare, and drill down into the visual representations of the data.This enhanced data visualization capability is useful during the initial phases of data analysis and the resulting visualizations provide a compelling way to publish data as an online supplement to journal articles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Arizona, Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences Department, Tucson, AZ, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
This article introduces the neuroimaging community to the dynamic visualization workbench, Weave (https://www.oicweave.org/), and a set of enhancements to allow the visualization of brain maps. The enhancements comprise a set of brain choropleths and the ability to display these as stacked slices, accessible with a slider. For the first time, this allows the neuroimaging community to take advantage of the advanced tools already available for exploring geographic data. Our brain choropleths are modeled after widely used geographic maps but this mashup of brain choropleths with extant visualization software fills an important neuroinformatic niche. To date, most neuroinformatic tools have provided online databases and atlases of the brain, but not good ways to display the related data (e.g., behavioral, genetic, medical, etc). The extension of the choropleth to brain maps allows us to leverage general-purpose visualization tools for concurrent exploration of brain images and related data. Related data can be represented as a variety of tables, charts and graphs that are dynamically linked to each other and to the brain choropleths. We demonstrate that the simplified region-based analyses that underlay choropleths can provide insights into neuroimaging data comparable to those achieved by using more conventional methods. In addition, the interactive interface facilitates additional insights by allowing the user to filter, compare, and drill down into the visual representations of the data. This enhanced data visualization capability is useful during the initial phases of data analysis and the resulting visualizations provide a compelling way to publish data as an online supplement to journal articles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Tool Layout for Visualization 4.http://demo.oicweave.org/weave.html?file=brain-choropleths/visualization4.weave. This visualization was designed to display the continuity of activation for each region from one scan to the next. For purposes of this discussion, the data is filtered to show only data for IC-1. Lines are colored by lobe in the figure, but the attribute menu to the right of the color legend allows the user to color the lines by IC. It is apparent that IC-1 has a lot of suprathreshold regions in the temporal lobe (purple) and most of the activations reoccur in all four scans.
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pone.0139453.g005: Tool Layout for Visualization 4.http://demo.oicweave.org/weave.html?file=brain-choropleths/visualization4.weave. This visualization was designed to display the continuity of activation for each region from one scan to the next. For purposes of this discussion, the data is filtered to show only data for IC-1. Lines are colored by lobe in the figure, but the attribute menu to the right of the color legend allows the user to color the lines by IC. It is apparent that IC-1 has a lot of suprathreshold regions in the temporal lobe (purple) and most of the activations reoccur in all four scans.

Mentions: Visualization 4 (Fig 5, http://demo.oicweave.org/weave.html?file=brain-choropleths/visualization4.weave) was developed to compare how continuously regions are activated across the scans. This is the only one of our visualizations that does not separate signals based on performance. In this visualization, we can see at a glance whether a region comes online briefly or persistently and, at any scan, how many regions are online. This is particularly useful for data about learning collected over multiple scans in a single session, and could be equally useful for longitudinal studies where scans are collected across longer time frames. Visualization 4 is based on a single table of 134 records. Each record names a region that was suprathreshold in one or more scans and indicates which scans were suprathreshold (mean t-stat above threshold in the group). Regions are named so that the lines will be sorted by lobe (e.g., Temp_STG_post for posterior superior temporal gyrus).


Dynamic Data Visualization with Weave and Brain Choropleths.

Patterson D, Hicks T, Dufilie A, Grinstein G, Plante E - PLoS ONE (2015)

Tool Layout for Visualization 4.http://demo.oicweave.org/weave.html?file=brain-choropleths/visualization4.weave. This visualization was designed to display the continuity of activation for each region from one scan to the next. For purposes of this discussion, the data is filtered to show only data for IC-1. Lines are colored by lobe in the figure, but the attribute menu to the right of the color legend allows the user to color the lines by IC. It is apparent that IC-1 has a lot of suprathreshold regions in the temporal lobe (purple) and most of the activations reoccur in all four scans.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4587848&req=5

pone.0139453.g005: Tool Layout for Visualization 4.http://demo.oicweave.org/weave.html?file=brain-choropleths/visualization4.weave. This visualization was designed to display the continuity of activation for each region from one scan to the next. For purposes of this discussion, the data is filtered to show only data for IC-1. Lines are colored by lobe in the figure, but the attribute menu to the right of the color legend allows the user to color the lines by IC. It is apparent that IC-1 has a lot of suprathreshold regions in the temporal lobe (purple) and most of the activations reoccur in all four scans.
Mentions: Visualization 4 (Fig 5, http://demo.oicweave.org/weave.html?file=brain-choropleths/visualization4.weave) was developed to compare how continuously regions are activated across the scans. This is the only one of our visualizations that does not separate signals based on performance. In this visualization, we can see at a glance whether a region comes online briefly or persistently and, at any scan, how many regions are online. This is particularly useful for data about learning collected over multiple scans in a single session, and could be equally useful for longitudinal studies where scans are collected across longer time frames. Visualization 4 is based on a single table of 134 records. Each record names a region that was suprathreshold in one or more scans and indicates which scans were suprathreshold (mean t-stat above threshold in the group). Regions are named so that the lines will be sorted by lobe (e.g., Temp_STG_post for posterior superior temporal gyrus).

Bottom Line: We demonstrate that the simplified region-based analyses that underlay choropleths can provide insights into neuroimaging data comparable to those achieved by using more conventional methods.In addition, the interactive interface facilitates additional insights by allowing the user to filter, compare, and drill down into the visual representations of the data.This enhanced data visualization capability is useful during the initial phases of data analysis and the resulting visualizations provide a compelling way to publish data as an online supplement to journal articles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Arizona, Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences Department, Tucson, AZ, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
This article introduces the neuroimaging community to the dynamic visualization workbench, Weave (https://www.oicweave.org/), and a set of enhancements to allow the visualization of brain maps. The enhancements comprise a set of brain choropleths and the ability to display these as stacked slices, accessible with a slider. For the first time, this allows the neuroimaging community to take advantage of the advanced tools already available for exploring geographic data. Our brain choropleths are modeled after widely used geographic maps but this mashup of brain choropleths with extant visualization software fills an important neuroinformatic niche. To date, most neuroinformatic tools have provided online databases and atlases of the brain, but not good ways to display the related data (e.g., behavioral, genetic, medical, etc). The extension of the choropleth to brain maps allows us to leverage general-purpose visualization tools for concurrent exploration of brain images and related data. Related data can be represented as a variety of tables, charts and graphs that are dynamically linked to each other and to the brain choropleths. We demonstrate that the simplified region-based analyses that underlay choropleths can provide insights into neuroimaging data comparable to those achieved by using more conventional methods. In addition, the interactive interface facilitates additional insights by allowing the user to filter, compare, and drill down into the visual representations of the data. This enhanced data visualization capability is useful during the initial phases of data analysis and the resulting visualizations provide a compelling way to publish data as an online supplement to journal articles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus