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Evaluation of mass drug administration in the program to control imported lymphatic filariasis in Thailand.

Toothong T, Tipayamongkholgul M, Suwannapong N, Suvannadabba S - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Incorrect perceptions about the side-effects of DEC also obstructed DEC access for Myanmar immigrants.Hospital-based DEC administration was an inappropriate approach to DEC delivery in areas with highly mobile Myanmar immigrants.Incorporating health-center personnel in DEC delivery twice yearly and improving the perceptions of DEC side effects would likely increase DEC coverage among Myanmar immigrants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University, 420/1 Rajvithi Road, Ratchathewi, Bangkok, 10400, Thailand. tanaporn18@ymail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Migration plays a major role in the emergence and resurgence of lymphatic filariasis (LF) in many countries. Because of the high prevalence of Imported Bancroftian Filariasis (IBF) caused by nocturnally periodic Wuchereria bancrofti and the intensive movement of immigrant workers from endemic areas, Thailand has implemented two doses of 6 mg/kg diethylcarbamazine (DEC) with interval of 6 months to prevent IBF. In areas where immigrants are very mobile, the administration of DEC may be compromised. This study aimed to evaluate DEC administration and its barriers in such areas.

Methods: A cross-sectional study with two-stage stratified cluster sampling was conducted. We selected Myanmar immigrants aged >18 years from factory and fishery areas of Samut Sakhon Province for interview with a structured questionnaire. We also interviewed health personnel regarding the functions of the LF program and practice of DEC delivery among immigrants. Associations were measured by multiple logistic regression, at P <0.05.

Results: DEC coverage among the immigrants was 75 %, below the national target. All had received DEC only once during health examinations at general hospitals for work permit renewals. None of the health centers in each community provided DEC. Significant barriers to DEC access included being undocumented (adjusted OR = 74.23; 95 % CI = 26.32-209.34), unemployed (adjusted OR = 5.09; 95 % CI = 3.39-7.64), daily employed (adjusted OR = 4.33; 95 % CI = 2.91-6.46), short-term immigrant (adjusted OR = 1.62; 95 % CI = 1.04-2.52) and living in a fishery area (adjusted OR = 1.57; 95 % CI = 1.04-2.52). Incorrect perceptions about the side-effects of DEC also obstructed DEC access for Myanmar immigrants. All positive LF antigenic immigrants reported visiting and emigrating from LF-endemic areas.

Conclusion: Hospital-based DEC administration was an inappropriate approach to DEC delivery in areas with highly mobile Myanmar immigrants. Incorporating health-center personnel in DEC delivery twice yearly and improving the perceptions of DEC side effects would likely increase DEC coverage among Myanmar immigrants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of Thailand with study area: Samut Sakhon Province. (Solid line presented provincial boundary and black color oval presented municipal area)
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Fig1: Map of Thailand with study area: Samut Sakhon Province. (Solid line presented provincial boundary and black color oval presented municipal area)

Mentions: A cross-sectional study, using both quantitative and qualitative methods, was conducted in a metropolitan area with large seafood-processing and fishing industries, in Samut Sakhon Province, Thailand (Fig. 1). Samut Sakhon is located 30 km south of Bangkok and north of the gulf of Thailand. This area comprises the second highest number of Myanmar immigrants, following Bangkok. Two-stage stratified cluster sampling was used to select six Myanmar communities from factory and fishery areas. Two Myanmar immigrants aged >18 years were selected from each household in the sample area. The estimated sample size was calculated by single proportion estimation, with alpha level 0.05, DEC coverage proportion 52.0 % [15], precision error 5 %, and design effect two. The study sample required a minimum of 767 Myanmar immigrants. All local health personnel responsible for LF-control programs in the selected communities were also recruited for interview.Fig. 1


Evaluation of mass drug administration in the program to control imported lymphatic filariasis in Thailand.

Toothong T, Tipayamongkholgul M, Suwannapong N, Suvannadabba S - BMC Public Health (2015)

Map of Thailand with study area: Samut Sakhon Province. (Solid line presented provincial boundary and black color oval presented municipal area)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4587715&req=5

Fig1: Map of Thailand with study area: Samut Sakhon Province. (Solid line presented provincial boundary and black color oval presented municipal area)
Mentions: A cross-sectional study, using both quantitative and qualitative methods, was conducted in a metropolitan area with large seafood-processing and fishing industries, in Samut Sakhon Province, Thailand (Fig. 1). Samut Sakhon is located 30 km south of Bangkok and north of the gulf of Thailand. This area comprises the second highest number of Myanmar immigrants, following Bangkok. Two-stage stratified cluster sampling was used to select six Myanmar communities from factory and fishery areas. Two Myanmar immigrants aged >18 years were selected from each household in the sample area. The estimated sample size was calculated by single proportion estimation, with alpha level 0.05, DEC coverage proportion 52.0 % [15], precision error 5 %, and design effect two. The study sample required a minimum of 767 Myanmar immigrants. All local health personnel responsible for LF-control programs in the selected communities were also recruited for interview.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Incorrect perceptions about the side-effects of DEC also obstructed DEC access for Myanmar immigrants.Hospital-based DEC administration was an inappropriate approach to DEC delivery in areas with highly mobile Myanmar immigrants.Incorporating health-center personnel in DEC delivery twice yearly and improving the perceptions of DEC side effects would likely increase DEC coverage among Myanmar immigrants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University, 420/1 Rajvithi Road, Ratchathewi, Bangkok, 10400, Thailand. tanaporn18@ymail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Migration plays a major role in the emergence and resurgence of lymphatic filariasis (LF) in many countries. Because of the high prevalence of Imported Bancroftian Filariasis (IBF) caused by nocturnally periodic Wuchereria bancrofti and the intensive movement of immigrant workers from endemic areas, Thailand has implemented two doses of 6 mg/kg diethylcarbamazine (DEC) with interval of 6 months to prevent IBF. In areas where immigrants are very mobile, the administration of DEC may be compromised. This study aimed to evaluate DEC administration and its barriers in such areas.

Methods: A cross-sectional study with two-stage stratified cluster sampling was conducted. We selected Myanmar immigrants aged >18 years from factory and fishery areas of Samut Sakhon Province for interview with a structured questionnaire. We also interviewed health personnel regarding the functions of the LF program and practice of DEC delivery among immigrants. Associations were measured by multiple logistic regression, at P <0.05.

Results: DEC coverage among the immigrants was 75 %, below the national target. All had received DEC only once during health examinations at general hospitals for work permit renewals. None of the health centers in each community provided DEC. Significant barriers to DEC access included being undocumented (adjusted OR = 74.23; 95 % CI = 26.32-209.34), unemployed (adjusted OR = 5.09; 95 % CI = 3.39-7.64), daily employed (adjusted OR = 4.33; 95 % CI = 2.91-6.46), short-term immigrant (adjusted OR = 1.62; 95 % CI = 1.04-2.52) and living in a fishery area (adjusted OR = 1.57; 95 % CI = 1.04-2.52). Incorrect perceptions about the side-effects of DEC also obstructed DEC access for Myanmar immigrants. All positive LF antigenic immigrants reported visiting and emigrating from LF-endemic areas.

Conclusion: Hospital-based DEC administration was an inappropriate approach to DEC delivery in areas with highly mobile Myanmar immigrants. Incorporating health-center personnel in DEC delivery twice yearly and improving the perceptions of DEC side effects would likely increase DEC coverage among Myanmar immigrants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus