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Ex-Ante Economic Impact Assessment of Genetically Modified Banana Resistant to Xanthomonas Wilt in the Great Lakes Region of Africa.

Ainembabazi JH, Tripathi L, Rusike J, Abdoulaye T, Manyong V - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: However, aggregate benefits vary substantially across the target countries ranging from US$ 20 million to 953 million, highest in countries where disease incidence and production losses are high, ranging from 51 to 83% of production.The main beneficiaries of this technology development are farmers and consumers, although the latter benefit more than the former from reduced prices.Designing a participatory breeding program involving farmers and consumers signifies the successful adoption and consumption of GM banana in the target countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Kampala, Uganda.

ABSTRACT

Background: Credible empirical evidence is scanty on the social implications of genetically modified (GM) crops in Africa, especially on vegetatively propagated crops. Little is known about the future success of introducing GM technologies into staple crops such as bananas, which are widely produced and consumed in the Great Lakes Region of Africa (GLA). GM banana has a potential to control the destructive banana Xanthomonas wilt disease.

Objective: To gain a better understanding of future adoption and consumption of GM banana in the GLA countries which are yet to permit the production of GM crops; specifically, to evaluate the potential economic impacts of GM cultivars resistant to banana Xanthomonas wilt disease.

Data sources: The paper uses data collected from farmers, traders, agricultural extension agents and key informants in the GLA.

Analysis: We analyze the perceptions of the respondents about the adoption and consumption of GM crop. Economic surplus model is used to determine future economic benefits and costs of producing GM banana.

Results: On the release of GM banana for commercialization, the expected initial adoption rate ranges from 21 to 70%, while the ceiling adoption rate is up to 100%. Investment in the development of GM banana is economically viable. However, aggregate benefits vary substantially across the target countries ranging from US$ 20 million to 953 million, highest in countries where disease incidence and production losses are high, ranging from 51 to 83% of production.

Conclusion: The findings support investment in the development of GM banana resistant to Xanthomonas wilt disease. The main beneficiaries of this technology development are farmers and consumers, although the latter benefit more than the former from reduced prices. Designing a participatory breeding program involving farmers and consumers signifies the successful adoption and consumption of GM banana in the target countries.

No MeSH data available.


Farmers’ awareness of BXW disease in target countries.
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pone.0138998.g001: Farmers’ awareness of BXW disease in target countries.

Mentions: Participating farmers became aware of BXW as far back as 2001, but the majority realized its devastating consequences as recently as 2010 (Fig 1). Although farmers in the sample first heard about BXW around 2001, the first occurrence of BXW on the farmers’ plantations in the study areas generally started in 2005 with the majority experiencing it in 2010 through 2011. The impact on production in the study areas is devastating. The average production losses are highest in DRC (83%) and Uganda (71%), and range from 39 to 51% in other countries (Fig 2). These figures were obtained as averages from farmers, extension agents and key informants. These losses are within the range reported in earlier studies in the region. For example, Karamura et al. [26] estimated in Uganda a loss in banana production of 65–80% due to BXW. The implication is that the existing cultural control methods appear somewhat ineffective in combating the effects of BXW. In Uganda, for example, the first occurrence of BXW was observed in 2001, but production losses have remained high despite the application of existing recommended control methods and a wide mass media campaign by the extension service programs. Results (Table 2) show that more than half of the farmers (54%) used a combination of control methods including removing male buds and infected plants and using sterilized tools, but only 3% avoided the introduction of suckers from unknown locations. This potentially leads to a vicious cycle of BXW occurrence on farmers’ fields—in the sense that, after all infected plants or mats have been removed; the new planting material remains a potential source of infection.


Ex-Ante Economic Impact Assessment of Genetically Modified Banana Resistant to Xanthomonas Wilt in the Great Lakes Region of Africa.

Ainembabazi JH, Tripathi L, Rusike J, Abdoulaye T, Manyong V - PLoS ONE (2015)

Farmers’ awareness of BXW disease in target countries.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4587572&req=5

pone.0138998.g001: Farmers’ awareness of BXW disease in target countries.
Mentions: Participating farmers became aware of BXW as far back as 2001, but the majority realized its devastating consequences as recently as 2010 (Fig 1). Although farmers in the sample first heard about BXW around 2001, the first occurrence of BXW on the farmers’ plantations in the study areas generally started in 2005 with the majority experiencing it in 2010 through 2011. The impact on production in the study areas is devastating. The average production losses are highest in DRC (83%) and Uganda (71%), and range from 39 to 51% in other countries (Fig 2). These figures were obtained as averages from farmers, extension agents and key informants. These losses are within the range reported in earlier studies in the region. For example, Karamura et al. [26] estimated in Uganda a loss in banana production of 65–80% due to BXW. The implication is that the existing cultural control methods appear somewhat ineffective in combating the effects of BXW. In Uganda, for example, the first occurrence of BXW was observed in 2001, but production losses have remained high despite the application of existing recommended control methods and a wide mass media campaign by the extension service programs. Results (Table 2) show that more than half of the farmers (54%) used a combination of control methods including removing male buds and infected plants and using sterilized tools, but only 3% avoided the introduction of suckers from unknown locations. This potentially leads to a vicious cycle of BXW occurrence on farmers’ fields—in the sense that, after all infected plants or mats have been removed; the new planting material remains a potential source of infection.

Bottom Line: However, aggregate benefits vary substantially across the target countries ranging from US$ 20 million to 953 million, highest in countries where disease incidence and production losses are high, ranging from 51 to 83% of production.The main beneficiaries of this technology development are farmers and consumers, although the latter benefit more than the former from reduced prices.Designing a participatory breeding program involving farmers and consumers signifies the successful adoption and consumption of GM banana in the target countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Kampala, Uganda.

ABSTRACT

Background: Credible empirical evidence is scanty on the social implications of genetically modified (GM) crops in Africa, especially on vegetatively propagated crops. Little is known about the future success of introducing GM technologies into staple crops such as bananas, which are widely produced and consumed in the Great Lakes Region of Africa (GLA). GM banana has a potential to control the destructive banana Xanthomonas wilt disease.

Objective: To gain a better understanding of future adoption and consumption of GM banana in the GLA countries which are yet to permit the production of GM crops; specifically, to evaluate the potential economic impacts of GM cultivars resistant to banana Xanthomonas wilt disease.

Data sources: The paper uses data collected from farmers, traders, agricultural extension agents and key informants in the GLA.

Analysis: We analyze the perceptions of the respondents about the adoption and consumption of GM crop. Economic surplus model is used to determine future economic benefits and costs of producing GM banana.

Results: On the release of GM banana for commercialization, the expected initial adoption rate ranges from 21 to 70%, while the ceiling adoption rate is up to 100%. Investment in the development of GM banana is economically viable. However, aggregate benefits vary substantially across the target countries ranging from US$ 20 million to 953 million, highest in countries where disease incidence and production losses are high, ranging from 51 to 83% of production.

Conclusion: The findings support investment in the development of GM banana resistant to Xanthomonas wilt disease. The main beneficiaries of this technology development are farmers and consumers, although the latter benefit more than the former from reduced prices. Designing a participatory breeding program involving farmers and consumers signifies the successful adoption and consumption of GM banana in the target countries.

No MeSH data available.