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Training of verbal creativity modulates brain activity in regions associated with language ‐ and memory ‐ related demands

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ABSTRACT

2015 the authors human brain mapping published by wiley periodicals, inc.: This functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) study was designed to investigate changes in functional patterns of brain activity during creative ideation as a result of a computerized, 3‐week verbal creativity training. The training was composed of various verbal divergent thinking exercises requiring participants to train approximately 20 min per day. Fifty‐three participants were tested three times (psychometric tests and fMRI assessment) with an intertest‐interval of 4 weeks each. Participants were randomly assigned to two different training groups, which received the training time‐delayed: The first training group was trained between the first and the second test, while the second group accomplished the training between the second and the third test session. At the behavioral level, only one training group showed improvements in different facets of verbal creativity right after the training. Yet, functional patterns of brain activity during creative ideation were strikingly similar across both training groups. Whole‐brain voxel‐wise analyses (along with supplementary region of interest analyses) revealed that the training was associated with activity changes in well‐known creativity‐related brain regions such as the left inferior parietal cortex and the left middle temporal gyrus, which have been shown as being particularly sensitive to the originality facet of creativity in previous research. Taken together, this study demonstrates that continuous engagement in a specific complex cognitive task like divergent thinking is associated with reliable changes of activity patterns in relevant brain areas, suggesting more effective search, retrieval, and integration from internal memory representations as a result of the training. Hum Brain Mapp 36:4104–4115, 2015. ©

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Time‐related changes of brain activity patterns (contrast estimates of the AUT vs. IT contrasts) in functionally defined ROI. Significant effects involving TIME of assessment (including trends toward significance) were found in the bilateral supramarginal gyri (SMG), the left middle temporal gyrus (MTG), the left posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) and the left AG.
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hbm22901-fig-0004: Time‐related changes of brain activity patterns (contrast estimates of the AUT vs. IT contrasts) in functionally defined ROI. Significant effects involving TIME of assessment (including trends toward significance) were found in the bilateral supramarginal gyri (SMG), the left middle temporal gyrus (MTG), the left posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) and the left AG.

Mentions: The ANOVAs yielded significant main effects of TIME for the SMG bilaterally (left: F (2, 102) = 4.68, P = 0.01, η2p = 0.08; right: F (2, 102) = 4.28, P = 0.02, η2p = 0.08), suggesting general increases in AUT (relative to IT) activation as a function of time. Inspection of Figure 4 reveals that in the right SMG the significant TIME effect seems to be driven by TG1, which showed comparatively strong activation increases right after the training (i.e., from t1 to t2; t(23) = −3.16, P = 0.004). The relevant interaction between TIME and GROUP, however, was not significant (F (2, 102) = 2.03, P = 0.14, η2p = 0.04). In addition to the significant TIME effects in the bilateral SMG, brain activation in the left posterior MTG tended to increase from t1 to t3 (TIME: F (2, 102) = 2.69, P = 0.07, η2p = 0.05).


Training of verbal creativity modulates brain activity in regions associated with language ‐ and memory ‐ related demands
Time‐related changes of brain activity patterns (contrast estimates of the AUT vs. IT contrasts) in functionally defined ROI. Significant effects involving TIME of assessment (including trends toward significance) were found in the bilateral supramarginal gyri (SMG), the left middle temporal gyrus (MTG), the left posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) and the left AG.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4587539&req=5

hbm22901-fig-0004: Time‐related changes of brain activity patterns (contrast estimates of the AUT vs. IT contrasts) in functionally defined ROI. Significant effects involving TIME of assessment (including trends toward significance) were found in the bilateral supramarginal gyri (SMG), the left middle temporal gyrus (MTG), the left posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) and the left AG.
Mentions: The ANOVAs yielded significant main effects of TIME for the SMG bilaterally (left: F (2, 102) = 4.68, P = 0.01, η2p = 0.08; right: F (2, 102) = 4.28, P = 0.02, η2p = 0.08), suggesting general increases in AUT (relative to IT) activation as a function of time. Inspection of Figure 4 reveals that in the right SMG the significant TIME effect seems to be driven by TG1, which showed comparatively strong activation increases right after the training (i.e., from t1 to t2; t(23) = −3.16, P = 0.004). The relevant interaction between TIME and GROUP, however, was not significant (F (2, 102) = 2.03, P = 0.14, η2p = 0.04). In addition to the significant TIME effects in the bilateral SMG, brain activation in the left posterior MTG tended to increase from t1 to t3 (TIME: F (2, 102) = 2.69, P = 0.07, η2p = 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

2015 the authors human brain mapping published by wiley periodicals, inc.: This functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) study was designed to investigate changes in functional patterns of brain activity during creative ideation as a result of a computerized, 3‐week verbal creativity training. The training was composed of various verbal divergent thinking exercises requiring participants to train approximately 20 min per day. Fifty‐three participants were tested three times (psychometric tests and fMRI assessment) with an intertest‐interval of 4 weeks each. Participants were randomly assigned to two different training groups, which received the training time‐delayed: The first training group was trained between the first and the second test, while the second group accomplished the training between the second and the third test session. At the behavioral level, only one training group showed improvements in different facets of verbal creativity right after the training. Yet, functional patterns of brain activity during creative ideation were strikingly similar across both training groups. Whole‐brain voxel‐wise analyses (along with supplementary region of interest analyses) revealed that the training was associated with activity changes in well‐known creativity‐related brain regions such as the left inferior parietal cortex and the left middle temporal gyrus, which have been shown as being particularly sensitive to the originality facet of creativity in previous research. Taken together, this study demonstrates that continuous engagement in a specific complex cognitive task like divergent thinking is associated with reliable changes of activity patterns in relevant brain areas, suggesting more effective search, retrieval, and integration from internal memory representations as a result of the training. Hum Brain Mapp 36:4104–4115, 2015. ©

No MeSH data available.