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Delivering Agents Locally into Articular Cartilage by Intense MHz Ultrasound.

Nieminen HJ, Ylitalo T, Suuronen JP, Rahunen K, Salmi A, Saarakkala S, Serimaa R, Hæggström E - Ultrasound Med Biol (2015)

Bottom Line: Current drug delivery relies on systemic delivery or injections into the joint.Because articular cartilage (AC) degeneration can be local and drug exposure outside the lesion can cause adverse effects, localized drug delivery could permit new drug treatment strategies.In conclusion, we identify intense megahertz ultrasound as a technique that potentially enables localized non-destructive delivery of osteoarthritis drugs or drug carriers into articular cartilage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: heikki.nieminen@helsinki.fi.

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Damage assessment. Typical histologic sections for damage assessment samples: ultrasound exposure (left) and no ultrasound exposure (right). We observed no difference in proteoglycan (Safranin-O staining) or collagen (Masson's trichrome staining) distribution or fibrillation in superficial articular cartilage between the different groups. This suggests that intense megahertz ultrasound did not induce evident damage to the articular cartilage.
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fig6: Damage assessment. Typical histologic sections for damage assessment samples: ultrasound exposure (left) and no ultrasound exposure (right). We observed no difference in proteoglycan (Safranin-O staining) or collagen (Masson's trichrome staining) distribution or fibrillation in superficial articular cartilage between the different groups. This suggests that intense megahertz ultrasound did not induce evident damage to the articular cartilage.

Mentions: Histologic evaluation of ultrasound-treated AC samples (6a–9a) and control samples (6b–9b) revealed no difference between the groups with respect to superficial tissue fibrillation or collagen (blue contrast in Masson's trichrome-stained sections) or proteoglycan (red contrast in Safranin-O-stained sections) distribution (Fig. 6).


Delivering Agents Locally into Articular Cartilage by Intense MHz Ultrasound.

Nieminen HJ, Ylitalo T, Suuronen JP, Rahunen K, Salmi A, Saarakkala S, Serimaa R, Hæggström E - Ultrasound Med Biol (2015)

Damage assessment. Typical histologic sections for damage assessment samples: ultrasound exposure (left) and no ultrasound exposure (right). We observed no difference in proteoglycan (Safranin-O staining) or collagen (Masson's trichrome staining) distribution or fibrillation in superficial articular cartilage between the different groups. This suggests that intense megahertz ultrasound did not induce evident damage to the articular cartilage.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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fig6: Damage assessment. Typical histologic sections for damage assessment samples: ultrasound exposure (left) and no ultrasound exposure (right). We observed no difference in proteoglycan (Safranin-O staining) or collagen (Masson's trichrome staining) distribution or fibrillation in superficial articular cartilage between the different groups. This suggests that intense megahertz ultrasound did not induce evident damage to the articular cartilage.
Mentions: Histologic evaluation of ultrasound-treated AC samples (6a–9a) and control samples (6b–9b) revealed no difference between the groups with respect to superficial tissue fibrillation or collagen (blue contrast in Masson's trichrome-stained sections) or proteoglycan (red contrast in Safranin-O-stained sections) distribution (Fig. 6).

Bottom Line: Current drug delivery relies on systemic delivery or injections into the joint.Because articular cartilage (AC) degeneration can be local and drug exposure outside the lesion can cause adverse effects, localized drug delivery could permit new drug treatment strategies.In conclusion, we identify intense megahertz ultrasound as a technique that potentially enables localized non-destructive delivery of osteoarthritis drugs or drug carriers into articular cartilage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: heikki.nieminen@helsinki.fi.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus