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Cavitating lung metastasis secondary to ameloblastoma.

Saheer S, Enose P, Thangakunam B, Irodi A, Korula A - Lung India (2015 Sep-Oct)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India E-mail: drssaheer@gmail.com.

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Metastasis occurs in 2-5% of patients and lung is approximately involved in 80% of cases... High-grade malignant potential, marked cellular atypia and increased mitotic activity are the characteristic features of ameloblastic carcinoma... Metastasis is not a definite phenomenon in ameloblastic carcinoma... Lung is the most common site of metastasis (upto 88%) followed by regional lymph nodes, vertebrae, pleura, skull, parotid gland, diaphragm and liver... Long duration of case, extensive initial disease, mandibular focus of primary tumor, multiple surgical and radiation procedure are associated with high likelihood of developing metastasis... Ameloblastoma presenting as cavitating lung secondaries probably not reported previously in literature and the common cause of cavitating lung lesions are primary lung malignancies with squamous histology followed by adeno- and large cell carcinoma... The non-malignant cause of cavitating lung lesions include infections like tuberculosis, atypical mycobacterial infection, Nocardia, Staphylococci, Klebsiella and histoplasmosis... Management of lung metastasis is disappointing and the various treatment options available are surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy... Surgical removable of operable lesions perhaps often the best treatment especially for peripheral lung metastasis... The role of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is not well defined... Response to radiotherapy is unpredictable and it is usually used as a palliative modality for patients with inoperable metastatic deposits... While chemotherapy, especially combination chemotherapy had showed reduction in tumor size in limited reports, but in most no improvement was noticed... In conclusion, we would like to emphasize two observations, first is ameloblastoma should be considered as on the differential diagnosis in patients with pulmonary cavitation and secondly these patients should be kept in close follow-up so that lung dissemination can be detected early and the current treatment of choice (surgery) can be initiated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

3D volume reconstructed CT (a) Showing 4 × 3 cm expansile lytic lesion in the body of right mandible (black arrow) and post-reconstructed CT (b) Showing mandible defect reconstructed with fibular graft (white arrow)
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Figure 2: 3D volume reconstructed CT (a) Showing 4 × 3 cm expansile lytic lesion in the body of right mandible (black arrow) and post-reconstructed CT (b) Showing mandible defect reconstructed with fibular graft (white arrow)

Mentions: A 38-year-old female presented to pulmonary medicine outpatient department (CMC Vellore, Tamilnadu, India) with complaints of dry cough and exertional breathlessness of 3 months duration. There was no history of fever, loss of appetite, weight loss, hemoptysis, chest pain or symptoms suggestive of connective tissue disease (CTD) or vasculitis. Our patient had significant past history and 5 years back she was diagnosed to have benign ameloblastoma of right mandible [Figure 1a] and underwent total excision and repair with fibular graft [Figure 2a and b]. She was in regular follow-up and there was no signs of recurrence.


Cavitating lung metastasis secondary to ameloblastoma.

Saheer S, Enose P, Thangakunam B, Irodi A, Korula A - Lung India (2015 Sep-Oct)

3D volume reconstructed CT (a) Showing 4 × 3 cm expansile lytic lesion in the body of right mandible (black arrow) and post-reconstructed CT (b) Showing mandible defect reconstructed with fibular graft (white arrow)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4587018&req=5

Figure 2: 3D volume reconstructed CT (a) Showing 4 × 3 cm expansile lytic lesion in the body of right mandible (black arrow) and post-reconstructed CT (b) Showing mandible defect reconstructed with fibular graft (white arrow)
Mentions: A 38-year-old female presented to pulmonary medicine outpatient department (CMC Vellore, Tamilnadu, India) with complaints of dry cough and exertional breathlessness of 3 months duration. There was no history of fever, loss of appetite, weight loss, hemoptysis, chest pain or symptoms suggestive of connective tissue disease (CTD) or vasculitis. Our patient had significant past history and 5 years back she was diagnosed to have benign ameloblastoma of right mandible [Figure 1a] and underwent total excision and repair with fibular graft [Figure 2a and b]. She was in regular follow-up and there was no signs of recurrence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India E-mail: drssaheer@gmail.com.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Metastasis occurs in 2-5% of patients and lung is approximately involved in 80% of cases... High-grade malignant potential, marked cellular atypia and increased mitotic activity are the characteristic features of ameloblastic carcinoma... Metastasis is not a definite phenomenon in ameloblastic carcinoma... Lung is the most common site of metastasis (upto 88%) followed by regional lymph nodes, vertebrae, pleura, skull, parotid gland, diaphragm and liver... Long duration of case, extensive initial disease, mandibular focus of primary tumor, multiple surgical and radiation procedure are associated with high likelihood of developing metastasis... Ameloblastoma presenting as cavitating lung secondaries probably not reported previously in literature and the common cause of cavitating lung lesions are primary lung malignancies with squamous histology followed by adeno- and large cell carcinoma... The non-malignant cause of cavitating lung lesions include infections like tuberculosis, atypical mycobacterial infection, Nocardia, Staphylococci, Klebsiella and histoplasmosis... Management of lung metastasis is disappointing and the various treatment options available are surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy... Surgical removable of operable lesions perhaps often the best treatment especially for peripheral lung metastasis... The role of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is not well defined... Response to radiotherapy is unpredictable and it is usually used as a palliative modality for patients with inoperable metastatic deposits... While chemotherapy, especially combination chemotherapy had showed reduction in tumor size in limited reports, but in most no improvement was noticed... In conclusion, we would like to emphasize two observations, first is ameloblastoma should be considered as on the differential diagnosis in patients with pulmonary cavitation and secondly these patients should be kept in close follow-up so that lung dissemination can be detected early and the current treatment of choice (surgery) can be initiated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus