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High-resolution quantification of root dynamics in split-nutrient rhizoslides reveals rapid and strong proliferation of maize roots in response to local high nitrogen.

in 't Zandt D, Le Marié C, Kirchgessner N, Visser EJ, Hund A - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: This may be a desirable trait in breeding programmes, since it decreases NO3(-) leaching and N2O emission.By contrast, laterals on the side without N did not show any detectable elongation beyond the first day after their emergence.We conclude that split-nutrient rhizoslides have great potential to improve our knowledge about nitrogen responsiveness and selection for contrasting genotypes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Plant Ecology, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen, The Netherlands Crop Science, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Universitätsstrasse 2, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland.

No MeSH data available.


(A) Root distribution in a rhizoslide of 30-day-old Zea mays plants of which half the root system was subjected to high (17mM) N after 15 d of growing without N. (B) Correlations between dry weight (DW) of the shoot and DW of the seminal root system present in the high N compartment, and between DW of the shoot and DW of the crown root system present in the high N compartment. Significance tested with a Spearman’s rank correlation (rs; n=18).
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Figure 4: (A) Root distribution in a rhizoslide of 30-day-old Zea mays plants of which half the root system was subjected to high (17mM) N after 15 d of growing without N. (B) Correlations between dry weight (DW) of the shoot and DW of the seminal root system present in the high N compartment, and between DW of the shoot and DW of the crown root system present in the high N compartment. Significance tested with a Spearman’s rank correlation (rs; n=18).

Mentions: To determine whether local application of N resulted in selective root placement, N was applied to only one half of the root system of 15-day-old maize seedlings previously grown without N. This resulted in a root biomass that was 3.6 times higher in the compartment that received N than in the compartment without N (Fig. 4A, Table 1). At the time of solution change, the crown root system had already started to develop while the seminal roots were 2 weeks old. Accordingly, the N placement had a strong effect on the developing crown roots which made up 85% of the selectively placed roots. The other 15% were represented by the seminal roots. The importance of the crown root system was also suggested by a positive correlation between dry weight of the part of the root system in the high N compartment and the dry weight of the shoot, whereas no correlation was found between biomass of the seminal root system in the same compartment and dry weight of the shoot (Fig. 4B). Based on these data, further analyses were done solely on the crown root system.


High-resolution quantification of root dynamics in split-nutrient rhizoslides reveals rapid and strong proliferation of maize roots in response to local high nitrogen.

in 't Zandt D, Le Marié C, Kirchgessner N, Visser EJ, Hund A - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

(A) Root distribution in a rhizoslide of 30-day-old Zea mays plants of which half the root system was subjected to high (17mM) N after 15 d of growing without N. (B) Correlations between dry weight (DW) of the shoot and DW of the seminal root system present in the high N compartment, and between DW of the shoot and DW of the crown root system present in the high N compartment. Significance tested with a Spearman’s rank correlation (rs; n=18).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585423&req=5

Figure 4: (A) Root distribution in a rhizoslide of 30-day-old Zea mays plants of which half the root system was subjected to high (17mM) N after 15 d of growing without N. (B) Correlations between dry weight (DW) of the shoot and DW of the seminal root system present in the high N compartment, and between DW of the shoot and DW of the crown root system present in the high N compartment. Significance tested with a Spearman’s rank correlation (rs; n=18).
Mentions: To determine whether local application of N resulted in selective root placement, N was applied to only one half of the root system of 15-day-old maize seedlings previously grown without N. This resulted in a root biomass that was 3.6 times higher in the compartment that received N than in the compartment without N (Fig. 4A, Table 1). At the time of solution change, the crown root system had already started to develop while the seminal roots were 2 weeks old. Accordingly, the N placement had a strong effect on the developing crown roots which made up 85% of the selectively placed roots. The other 15% were represented by the seminal roots. The importance of the crown root system was also suggested by a positive correlation between dry weight of the part of the root system in the high N compartment and the dry weight of the shoot, whereas no correlation was found between biomass of the seminal root system in the same compartment and dry weight of the shoot (Fig. 4B). Based on these data, further analyses were done solely on the crown root system.

Bottom Line: This may be a desirable trait in breeding programmes, since it decreases NO3(-) leaching and N2O emission.By contrast, laterals on the side without N did not show any detectable elongation beyond the first day after their emergence.We conclude that split-nutrient rhizoslides have great potential to improve our knowledge about nitrogen responsiveness and selection for contrasting genotypes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Plant Ecology, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen, The Netherlands Crop Science, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Universitätsstrasse 2, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland.

No MeSH data available.