Limits...
Simultaneous effects of leaf irradiance and soil moisture on growth and root system architecture of novel wheat genotypes: implications for phenotyping.

Nagel KA, Bonnett D, Furbank R, Walter A, Schurr U, Watt M - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: In contrast, the other genotype showed much less plasticity and responsiveness to upper moist soil, but maintained deeper penetration of roots into the dry layer.The sum of shoot and root responses was greater when treated simultaneously to low light and low soil water, compared to each treatment alone, suggesting the value of whole plant phenotyping in response to multiple conditions for agronomic improvement.The results suggest that canopy management for increased irradiation of leaves would encourage root growth into deeper drier soil, and that genetic variation within closely related breeding lines may exist to favour surface root growth in response to irrigation or in-season rainfall.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CSIRO Plant Industry, GPO Box 1600, Canberra, ACT, 2601, Australia Institute of Bio- and Geosciences, IBG-2: Plant Sciences, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, Germany k.nagel@fz-juelich.de.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic of four growth conditions applied to two wheat genotypes. Light regimes: moderate light (450 µmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetically active radiation) and low light (250 µmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetically active radiation). Water conditions: well-watered (0.14g g−1) and low water (0.06g g-1) (this figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585422&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic of four growth conditions applied to two wheat genotypes. Light regimes: moderate light (450 µmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetically active radiation) and low light (250 µmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetically active radiation). Water conditions: well-watered (0.14g g−1) and low water (0.06g g-1) (this figure is available in colour at JXB online.)

Mentions: VJ 10 and VJ 30 plants were cultivated in rhizoboxes (10×250×500mm) filled with a mixture of 50% sand and 50% potting soil, sieved 3mm (see Fig. 1 for rhizobox set-up used here; adapted from Refshauge et al., 2006; Boyer et al., 2010). Seeds were pushed 3cm deep into the soil embryo facing downwards—two seeds per rhizobox—positioned at the transparent surface of the rhizobox, which was then covered with black foil. The black cover was only removed for root growth measurements. The top soil (top 0–10cm) was filled with soil with a water content of 0.14g g−1. The bottom soil (from top 10cm to 50cm) was set either to 0.14g g−1 (well-watered) or to 0.06g g−1 (low water). The soil at the top of the rhizobox was covered with a transparent film with holes for the shoots to prevent evaporation. Water content of the soil was maintained three times per week by weighing the rhizoboxes and adding lost water with a syringe from the top through the small holes in the transparent film. The supply of water to rhizoboxes from the top is a standard procedure in phenotyping experiments because this is the practical way to keep soil moisture at a controlled level. Addition of water from below is difficult to monitor and apply precisely. Application of water to the top soil could lead to situations in which the top layer of the rhizobox has higher moisture than deeper layers, but this pattern of water application to soil is common in the field during short irrigation events (Benli et al., 2007) or rain showers (Prechsl et al., 2015).


Simultaneous effects of leaf irradiance and soil moisture on growth and root system architecture of novel wheat genotypes: implications for phenotyping.

Nagel KA, Bonnett D, Furbank R, Walter A, Schurr U, Watt M - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Schematic of four growth conditions applied to two wheat genotypes. Light regimes: moderate light (450 µmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetically active radiation) and low light (250 µmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetically active radiation). Water conditions: well-watered (0.14g g−1) and low water (0.06g g-1) (this figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585422&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic of four growth conditions applied to two wheat genotypes. Light regimes: moderate light (450 µmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetically active radiation) and low light (250 µmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetically active radiation). Water conditions: well-watered (0.14g g−1) and low water (0.06g g-1) (this figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
Mentions: VJ 10 and VJ 30 plants were cultivated in rhizoboxes (10×250×500mm) filled with a mixture of 50% sand and 50% potting soil, sieved 3mm (see Fig. 1 for rhizobox set-up used here; adapted from Refshauge et al., 2006; Boyer et al., 2010). Seeds were pushed 3cm deep into the soil embryo facing downwards—two seeds per rhizobox—positioned at the transparent surface of the rhizobox, which was then covered with black foil. The black cover was only removed for root growth measurements. The top soil (top 0–10cm) was filled with soil with a water content of 0.14g g−1. The bottom soil (from top 10cm to 50cm) was set either to 0.14g g−1 (well-watered) or to 0.06g g−1 (low water). The soil at the top of the rhizobox was covered with a transparent film with holes for the shoots to prevent evaporation. Water content of the soil was maintained three times per week by weighing the rhizoboxes and adding lost water with a syringe from the top through the small holes in the transparent film. The supply of water to rhizoboxes from the top is a standard procedure in phenotyping experiments because this is the practical way to keep soil moisture at a controlled level. Addition of water from below is difficult to monitor and apply precisely. Application of water to the top soil could lead to situations in which the top layer of the rhizobox has higher moisture than deeper layers, but this pattern of water application to soil is common in the field during short irrigation events (Benli et al., 2007) or rain showers (Prechsl et al., 2015).

Bottom Line: In contrast, the other genotype showed much less plasticity and responsiveness to upper moist soil, but maintained deeper penetration of roots into the dry layer.The sum of shoot and root responses was greater when treated simultaneously to low light and low soil water, compared to each treatment alone, suggesting the value of whole plant phenotyping in response to multiple conditions for agronomic improvement.The results suggest that canopy management for increased irradiation of leaves would encourage root growth into deeper drier soil, and that genetic variation within closely related breeding lines may exist to favour surface root growth in response to irrigation or in-season rainfall.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CSIRO Plant Industry, GPO Box 1600, Canberra, ACT, 2601, Australia Institute of Bio- and Geosciences, IBG-2: Plant Sciences, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, Germany k.nagel@fz-juelich.de.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus