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Estimating chlorophyll content and photochemical yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII) using solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence measurements at different growing stages of attached leaves.

Tubuxin B, Rahimzadeh-Bajgiran P, Ginnan Y, Hosoi F, Omasa K - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Using leaves of Capsicum annuum cv. 'Sven' (paprika), the relationships between the Chl content and the steady-state Chl fluorescence near oxygen absorption bands of O2B (686nm) and O2A (760nm), measured under artificial and solar light at different growing stages of leaves, were evaluated.The steady-state solar-induced Chl fluorescence yield ratio correlated very well with the artificial-light-induced one (R(2) = 0.84).The high coefficient of determination (R(2) = 0.74) between the ΦPSII of the two methods shows that photosynthesis process parameters can be successfully estimated using the presented methodology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationships between leaf Chl content and steady-state SIF yields. (A) ΦFa686.7. (B) ΦFa760.4.
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Figure 4: Relationships between leaf Chl content and steady-state SIF yields. (A) ΦFa686.7. (B) ΦFa760.4.

Mentions: Figure 4 shows the relationships between leaf Chl content and steady-state solar-induced Chl fluorescence yields of ΦFs686.7 and ΦFs760.4. The Chl fluorescence yields of ΦFs686.7 decreased with an increase in Chl content (Fig. 4A), whereas the Chl fluorescence yields of ΦFs760.4 increased, although the yields varied largely, especially in ΦFs760.4 (Fig. 4B). Comparing Figs. 3 and 4, the solar-induced Chl fluorescence yield variation was larger than that induced by artificial light, probably because of a weak Chl fluorescence signal, lack of the sensitivity of the spectrometer, and solar fluctuation during the measurement.


Estimating chlorophyll content and photochemical yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII) using solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence measurements at different growing stages of attached leaves.

Tubuxin B, Rahimzadeh-Bajgiran P, Ginnan Y, Hosoi F, Omasa K - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Relationships between leaf Chl content and steady-state SIF yields. (A) ΦFa686.7. (B) ΦFa760.4.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585421&req=5

Figure 4: Relationships between leaf Chl content and steady-state SIF yields. (A) ΦFa686.7. (B) ΦFa760.4.
Mentions: Figure 4 shows the relationships between leaf Chl content and steady-state solar-induced Chl fluorescence yields of ΦFs686.7 and ΦFs760.4. The Chl fluorescence yields of ΦFs686.7 decreased with an increase in Chl content (Fig. 4A), whereas the Chl fluorescence yields of ΦFs760.4 increased, although the yields varied largely, especially in ΦFs760.4 (Fig. 4B). Comparing Figs. 3 and 4, the solar-induced Chl fluorescence yield variation was larger than that induced by artificial light, probably because of a weak Chl fluorescence signal, lack of the sensitivity of the spectrometer, and solar fluctuation during the measurement.

Bottom Line: Using leaves of Capsicum annuum cv. 'Sven' (paprika), the relationships between the Chl content and the steady-state Chl fluorescence near oxygen absorption bands of O2B (686nm) and O2A (760nm), measured under artificial and solar light at different growing stages of leaves, were evaluated.The steady-state solar-induced Chl fluorescence yield ratio correlated very well with the artificial-light-induced one (R(2) = 0.84).The high coefficient of determination (R(2) = 0.74) between the ΦPSII of the two methods shows that photosynthesis process parameters can be successfully estimated using the presented methodology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus