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Intensive field phenotyping of maize (Zea mays L.) root crowns identifies phenes and phene integration associated with plant growth and nitrogen acquisition.

York LM, Lynch JP - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Root phenes from both older and younger whorls of nodal roots contributed to variation in shoot mass and N uptake.The additive integration of root phenes accounted for 70% of the variation observed in shoot mass in low N soil.These results demonstrate the utility of intensive phenotyping of mature root systems, as well as the importance of phene integration in soil resource acquisition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA Ecology Graduate Program, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Scatter plots and linear regressions are shown for the relationship of the total number of nodes in a root crown with the total number of nodal roots in a root crown in both South Africa (SA, A) and the USA (B). Points are the mean of four replicates for each genotype. Data from high nitrogen (HN) are depicted with filled circles and in low nitrogen (LN) with filled triangles. Solid lines indicate the linear model of best fit for HN (y=6.09x+0.92; P=0.0066) and LN (y=4.82x+4.49; P=0.00266) in SA. Solid lines indicate the linear model of best fit for HN (y=8.44x–19.83; P=0.0177) and LN (y=3.07x+11.26; P=0.0082) in the USA. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
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Figure 3: Scatter plots and linear regressions are shown for the relationship of the total number of nodes in a root crown with the total number of nodal roots in a root crown in both South Africa (SA, A) and the USA (B). Points are the mean of four replicates for each genotype. Data from high nitrogen (HN) are depicted with filled circles and in low nitrogen (LN) with filled triangles. Solid lines indicate the linear model of best fit for HN (y=6.09x+0.92; P=0.0066) and LN (y=4.82x+4.49; P=0.00266) in SA. Solid lines indicate the linear model of best fit for HN (y=8.44x–19.83; P=0.0177) and LN (y=3.07x+11.26; P=0.0082) in the USA. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)

Mentions: Nodal root number (NRN), the combined number of nodal roots in an entire root crown, ranged between 31 and 53.75 among genotypes and N levels in South Africa (Fig. 3A). Nodal root number decreased 16% from 44 under HN to 36 under LN (P<0.01) in South Africa. The total number of nodes within a root crown varied between 5.7 and 8.5 among genotypes and N levels in South Africa (Fig. 3A). The number of nodes averaged across genotypes decreased 6% from seven nodes under HN to 6.6 nodes under LN (P =0.022). The linear models predicting nodal root number from the number of nodes in both HN (y=6.09x+0.92; P<0.01) and LN (y=4.82x+4.49; P<0.01) were significant in South Africa. In the USA, the linear models predicting nodal root number from number of nodes in both HN (y=8.44x–19.83; P=0.0177) and LN (y=3.07x+11.26: P=0.0082) were also significant (Fig. 3B). Correlations between total number of nodal roots and the occupancy of each whorl generally showed relationships between adjacent whorls in South Africa. In LN, the occupancies of whorls 2 and 6 were most correlated with NRN (Supplemetnary Fig. S9 at JXB online). In HN, the occupancies of whorls 3, 5, and 7 were most correlated with NRN (Supplementary Fig. S10).


Intensive field phenotyping of maize (Zea mays L.) root crowns identifies phenes and phene integration associated with plant growth and nitrogen acquisition.

York LM, Lynch JP - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Scatter plots and linear regressions are shown for the relationship of the total number of nodes in a root crown with the total number of nodal roots in a root crown in both South Africa (SA, A) and the USA (B). Points are the mean of four replicates for each genotype. Data from high nitrogen (HN) are depicted with filled circles and in low nitrogen (LN) with filled triangles. Solid lines indicate the linear model of best fit for HN (y=6.09x+0.92; P=0.0066) and LN (y=4.82x+4.49; P=0.00266) in SA. Solid lines indicate the linear model of best fit for HN (y=8.44x–19.83; P=0.0177) and LN (y=3.07x+11.26; P=0.0082) in the USA. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585417&req=5

Figure 3: Scatter plots and linear regressions are shown for the relationship of the total number of nodes in a root crown with the total number of nodal roots in a root crown in both South Africa (SA, A) and the USA (B). Points are the mean of four replicates for each genotype. Data from high nitrogen (HN) are depicted with filled circles and in low nitrogen (LN) with filled triangles. Solid lines indicate the linear model of best fit for HN (y=6.09x+0.92; P=0.0066) and LN (y=4.82x+4.49; P=0.00266) in SA. Solid lines indicate the linear model of best fit for HN (y=8.44x–19.83; P=0.0177) and LN (y=3.07x+11.26; P=0.0082) in the USA. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
Mentions: Nodal root number (NRN), the combined number of nodal roots in an entire root crown, ranged between 31 and 53.75 among genotypes and N levels in South Africa (Fig. 3A). Nodal root number decreased 16% from 44 under HN to 36 under LN (P<0.01) in South Africa. The total number of nodes within a root crown varied between 5.7 and 8.5 among genotypes and N levels in South Africa (Fig. 3A). The number of nodes averaged across genotypes decreased 6% from seven nodes under HN to 6.6 nodes under LN (P =0.022). The linear models predicting nodal root number from the number of nodes in both HN (y=6.09x+0.92; P<0.01) and LN (y=4.82x+4.49; P<0.01) were significant in South Africa. In the USA, the linear models predicting nodal root number from number of nodes in both HN (y=8.44x–19.83; P=0.0177) and LN (y=3.07x+11.26: P=0.0082) were also significant (Fig. 3B). Correlations between total number of nodal roots and the occupancy of each whorl generally showed relationships between adjacent whorls in South Africa. In LN, the occupancies of whorls 2 and 6 were most correlated with NRN (Supplemetnary Fig. S9 at JXB online). In HN, the occupancies of whorls 3, 5, and 7 were most correlated with NRN (Supplementary Fig. S10).

Bottom Line: Root phenes from both older and younger whorls of nodal roots contributed to variation in shoot mass and N uptake.The additive integration of root phenes accounted for 70% of the variation observed in shoot mass in low N soil.These results demonstrate the utility of intensive phenotyping of mature root systems, as well as the importance of phene integration in soil resource acquisition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA Ecology Graduate Program, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus