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Characterizing root response phenotypes by neural network analysis.

Hatzig SV, Schiessl S, Stahl A, Snowdon RJ - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Interactive changes in root architecture can be easily captured by individual intersection profiles generated by Sholl analysis.Validation using manual measurements confirmed that the number of lateral roots decreased, while mean lateral root length was enhanced, under osmotic stress conditions.The Sholl methodology is presented as a promising tool for selection of cultivars with advantageous root phenotypes under osmotic stress conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Breeding, IFZ Research Centre for Biosystems, Land Use and Nutrition, Justus Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26-32, 35392 Giessen, Germany sarah.hatzig@agrar.uni-giessen.de.

No MeSH data available.


Number of root intersections depending on the distance from root origin of a single soil grown winter oilseed rape root, repeated in 10 technical replications by re-spreading the root 10 times on the scanner plate. Sholl analysis was repeated on each scan. The single replications are represented by different symbols. Mean values are represented by a solid line. Error bars represent standard deviations (this figure is available in colour at JXB online).
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Figure 7: Number of root intersections depending on the distance from root origin of a single soil grown winter oilseed rape root, repeated in 10 technical replications by re-spreading the root 10 times on the scanner plate. Sholl analysis was repeated on each scan. The single replications are represented by different symbols. Mean values are represented by a solid line. Error bars represent standard deviations (this figure is available in colour at JXB online).

Mentions: Sholl analysis is a very simple and non-destructive method for characterization of root architecture and distribution in plants grown under hydroponic cultures. It is easy to apply Sholl analysis using the free, open-source software ImageJ. As the Sholl method relies on punctual measurements, it does not require the extremely high image quality and resolution necessary for measurements of root longitude and growth dynamics. The method could be validated by the manual counting of roots intersecting hand-drawn circles (Fig. 5). The slight overestimation of intersection number in comparison to the manual counts might be caused by sampling errors caused by pixel background noise in the images. These artefacts might be eliminated by an increase in image quality. To evaluate positional effects, the complex root system of a 22-d-old, soil-grown rapeseed plant was placed 10 times individually on the scanner plate. Calculations of standard deviations accounted for slight positional effects, while intersection patterns remain highly similar for all root images (Fig. 7). Positional effects might be excluded by using roots that are fixed in gel-based rhizotrons, for example.


Characterizing root response phenotypes by neural network analysis.

Hatzig SV, Schiessl S, Stahl A, Snowdon RJ - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Number of root intersections depending on the distance from root origin of a single soil grown winter oilseed rape root, repeated in 10 technical replications by re-spreading the root 10 times on the scanner plate. Sholl analysis was repeated on each scan. The single replications are represented by different symbols. Mean values are represented by a solid line. Error bars represent standard deviations (this figure is available in colour at JXB online).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585416&req=5

Figure 7: Number of root intersections depending on the distance from root origin of a single soil grown winter oilseed rape root, repeated in 10 technical replications by re-spreading the root 10 times on the scanner plate. Sholl analysis was repeated on each scan. The single replications are represented by different symbols. Mean values are represented by a solid line. Error bars represent standard deviations (this figure is available in colour at JXB online).
Mentions: Sholl analysis is a very simple and non-destructive method for characterization of root architecture and distribution in plants grown under hydroponic cultures. It is easy to apply Sholl analysis using the free, open-source software ImageJ. As the Sholl method relies on punctual measurements, it does not require the extremely high image quality and resolution necessary for measurements of root longitude and growth dynamics. The method could be validated by the manual counting of roots intersecting hand-drawn circles (Fig. 5). The slight overestimation of intersection number in comparison to the manual counts might be caused by sampling errors caused by pixel background noise in the images. These artefacts might be eliminated by an increase in image quality. To evaluate positional effects, the complex root system of a 22-d-old, soil-grown rapeseed plant was placed 10 times individually on the scanner plate. Calculations of standard deviations accounted for slight positional effects, while intersection patterns remain highly similar for all root images (Fig. 7). Positional effects might be excluded by using roots that are fixed in gel-based rhizotrons, for example.

Bottom Line: Interactive changes in root architecture can be easily captured by individual intersection profiles generated by Sholl analysis.Validation using manual measurements confirmed that the number of lateral roots decreased, while mean lateral root length was enhanced, under osmotic stress conditions.The Sholl methodology is presented as a promising tool for selection of cultivars with advantageous root phenotypes under osmotic stress conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Breeding, IFZ Research Centre for Biosystems, Land Use and Nutrition, Justus Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26-32, 35392 Giessen, Germany sarah.hatzig@agrar.uni-giessen.de.

No MeSH data available.