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Predicting the evolution of social networks with life cycle events.

Sharmeen F, Arentze T, Timmermans H - Transportation (Amst) (2015)

Bottom Line: Findings suggest that homophily has a strong effect on the formation of new ties.However, heterophily also plays a role in maintaining existing ties.Although the motivation of this research stems from incorporating social network dynamics in large-scale travel behaviour micro-simulation models, the research can be used in a variety of fields for similar purposes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, Vertigo 8.09, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

This paper presents a model of social network evolution, to predict and simulate changes in social networks induced by lifecycle events. We argue that social networks change with lifecycle events, and we extend a model of friendship selection to incorporate these dynamics of personal social networks. The model uses theories of homophily and reciprocity and is formulated in a random utility maximization framework to predict the formation of social ties between individuals in the population. It is then extended to predict the evolution of social networks in response to life cycle events. The model is estimated using attribute data of a national sample and an event-based retrospective dataset collected in 2009 and 2011 respectively. Findings suggest that homophily has a strong effect on the formation of new ties. However, heterophily also plays a role in maintaining existing ties. Although the motivation of this research stems from incorporating social network dynamics in large-scale travel behaviour micro-simulation models, the research can be used in a variety of fields for similar purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Social network dynamics according to life cycle events
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Fig3: Social network dynamics according to life cycle events

Mentions: The average number of ties lost is 1.44 and average number of new ties is 1.62 per respondent (Table 1). The proportion of ties lost per type of life cycle event is shown in Fig. 3. The differences between types of life cycle events are remarkable. Residential relocation has a larger impact on lost ties than new ones. The opposite is true for the event of children starting school. Change in civil status (defined by a change in cohabitation, wedding, separation and divorce) has a more equal impact in terms of lost and new ties. The proportions are among the highest compared to other types of life-cycle events. The proportion of new ties is the highest for the event of new job or study (Fig. 3).Fig. 2


Predicting the evolution of social networks with life cycle events.

Sharmeen F, Arentze T, Timmermans H - Transportation (Amst) (2015)

Social network dynamics according to life cycle events
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585409&req=5

Fig3: Social network dynamics according to life cycle events
Mentions: The average number of ties lost is 1.44 and average number of new ties is 1.62 per respondent (Table 1). The proportion of ties lost per type of life cycle event is shown in Fig. 3. The differences between types of life cycle events are remarkable. Residential relocation has a larger impact on lost ties than new ones. The opposite is true for the event of children starting school. Change in civil status (defined by a change in cohabitation, wedding, separation and divorce) has a more equal impact in terms of lost and new ties. The proportions are among the highest compared to other types of life-cycle events. The proportion of new ties is the highest for the event of new job or study (Fig. 3).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Findings suggest that homophily has a strong effect on the formation of new ties.However, heterophily also plays a role in maintaining existing ties.Although the motivation of this research stems from incorporating social network dynamics in large-scale travel behaviour micro-simulation models, the research can be used in a variety of fields for similar purposes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, Vertigo 8.09, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

This paper presents a model of social network evolution, to predict and simulate changes in social networks induced by lifecycle events. We argue that social networks change with lifecycle events, and we extend a model of friendship selection to incorporate these dynamics of personal social networks. The model uses theories of homophily and reciprocity and is formulated in a random utility maximization framework to predict the formation of social ties between individuals in the population. It is then extended to predict the evolution of social networks in response to life cycle events. The model is estimated using attribute data of a national sample and an event-based retrospective dataset collected in 2009 and 2011 respectively. Findings suggest that homophily has a strong effect on the formation of new ties. However, heterophily also plays a role in maintaining existing ties. Although the motivation of this research stems from incorporating social network dynamics in large-scale travel behaviour micro-simulation models, the research can be used in a variety of fields for similar purposes.

No MeSH data available.