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Rectal bleeding due to rectal erosion of vaginal mesh.

Ratneswaren A, Laskaratos FM, Kumar A, Hepworth C - Ann Gastroenterol (2015 Oct-Dec)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology (Anenta Ratneswaren, Faidon-Marios Laskaratos), Queen's Hospital, Barking Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, Romford, London, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Endoscopic view (at colonoscopy) of rectal erosion of vaginal mesh. (A) On insertion and (B) on retroflexion
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Figure 1: Endoscopic view (at colonoscopy) of rectal erosion of vaginal mesh. (A) On insertion and (B) on retroflexion

Mentions: A 68-year-old female presented to our Colorectal Surgery clinic with a 2-month history of tenesmus and discharge of mucus and blood per rectum. Her past medical history included dilatation and curettage for menorrhagia, Caesarian section, hysterectomy and vaginal wall prolapse repair 20 years previously. On examination there was a palpable mass in the rectum. A colonoscopy was performed and revealed anterior rectal mesh erosion in the lower rectum (Fig. 1). Rectal biopsies showed slightly inflamed mucosa with calcified debris and acute proctitis with benign mucosal ulceration. An MRI pelvis was performed which did not show any local complications, such as collections, abscess or fistula formation. The patient subsequently underwent trimming of the mesh (partial excision) which resulted in resolution of her symptoms.


Rectal bleeding due to rectal erosion of vaginal mesh.

Ratneswaren A, Laskaratos FM, Kumar A, Hepworth C - Ann Gastroenterol (2015 Oct-Dec)

Endoscopic view (at colonoscopy) of rectal erosion of vaginal mesh. (A) On insertion and (B) on retroflexion
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585401&req=5

Figure 1: Endoscopic view (at colonoscopy) of rectal erosion of vaginal mesh. (A) On insertion and (B) on retroflexion
Mentions: A 68-year-old female presented to our Colorectal Surgery clinic with a 2-month history of tenesmus and discharge of mucus and blood per rectum. Her past medical history included dilatation and curettage for menorrhagia, Caesarian section, hysterectomy and vaginal wall prolapse repair 20 years previously. On examination there was a palpable mass in the rectum. A colonoscopy was performed and revealed anterior rectal mesh erosion in the lower rectum (Fig. 1). Rectal biopsies showed slightly inflamed mucosa with calcified debris and acute proctitis with benign mucosal ulceration. An MRI pelvis was performed which did not show any local complications, such as collections, abscess or fistula formation. The patient subsequently underwent trimming of the mesh (partial excision) which resulted in resolution of her symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology (Anenta Ratneswaren, Faidon-Marios Laskaratos), Queen's Hospital, Barking Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, Romford, London, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus