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Effects of broken affordance on visual extinction.

Wulff M, Humphreys GW - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: In line with previous research (e.g., Riddoch et al., 2006), extinction was reduced when action-related object pairs and when unrelated tool pairs were presented compared to unrelated object pairs.In addition, performance with action-related objects decreased when the tool appeared on the ipsilesional side compared to when it was on the contralesional side, but only when the tool handle was intact.This attentional capture effect is mediated by the affordance to the intact tool.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Birmingham Birmingham, UK.

ABSTRACT
Previous studies have shown that visual extinction can be reduced if two objects are positioned to "afford" an action. Here we tested if this affordance effect was disrupted by "breaking" the affordance, i.e., if one of the objects actively used in the action had a broken handle. We assessed the effects of broken affordance on recovery from extinction in eight patients with right hemisphere lesions and left-sided extinction. Patients viewed object pairs that were or were not commonly used together and that were positioned for left- or right-hand actions. In the unrelated pair conditions, either two tools or two objects were presented. In line with previous research (e.g., Riddoch et al., 2006), extinction was reduced when action-related object pairs and when unrelated tool pairs were presented compared to unrelated object pairs. There was no significant difference in recovery rate between action-related (object-tool) and unrelated tool pairs. In addition, performance with action-related objects decreased when the tool appeared on the ipsilesional side compared to when it was on the contralesional side, but only when the tool handle was intact. There were minimal effects of breaking the handle of an object rather than a tool, and there was no effect of breaking the handle on either tools or objects on single item trials. The data suggest that breaking the handle of a tool lessens the degree to which it captures attention, with this attentional capture being strongest when the tool appears on the ipsilesional side. The capture of attention by the ipsilesional item then reduces the chance of detecting the contralesional stimulus. This attentional capture effect is mediated by the affordance to the intact tool.

No MeSH data available.


Action-related objects only. Effects of breaking the handle of the tool (A,B) or the object (C,D). Mean accuracies for action-related objects as a function of whether the tool handle (A) or the object handle (C) was broken compared to when both handles were intact. Mean patient accuracies (B,D) with error bars denote SE. Asterisks denote significance (**p < 0.01).
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Figure 4: Action-related objects only. Effects of breaking the handle of the tool (A,B) or the object (C,D). Mean accuracies for action-related objects as a function of whether the tool handle (A) or the object handle (C) was broken compared to when both handles were intact. Mean patient accuracies (B,D) with error bars denote SE. Asterisks denote significance (**p < 0.01).

Mentions: There were reliable main effects of side of tool, F(1,16) = 9.33 p = 0.008, = 0.368 (ipsilesional > contralesional) and patient, F(7,16) = 6.08 p = 0.001, = 0.727. The interaction between intact/broken handle and side of tool was reliable, F(1,16) = 12.90, p = 0.002, = 0.446. When both handles were intact, there was better performance when the tool was presented on the contralesional side relative to when it was presented on the ipsilesional side, t(23) = 3.84, p = 0.001 (Figure 4A), while there was no reliable effect of the positioning of the tool when the tool handle was broken. The side of tool by patient interaction, F(7,16) = 2.84, p = 0.040, = 0.554, was also significant (Figure 4B). Patients differed in the degree to which they reported more stimuli when the tool was on the ipsilesional compared to when the tool was on the contralesional side; these effects were present for all but one patient (P1).


Effects of broken affordance on visual extinction.

Wulff M, Humphreys GW - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Action-related objects only. Effects of breaking the handle of the tool (A,B) or the object (C,D). Mean accuracies for action-related objects as a function of whether the tool handle (A) or the object handle (C) was broken compared to when both handles were intact. Mean patient accuracies (B,D) with error bars denote SE. Asterisks denote significance (**p < 0.01).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585295&req=5

Figure 4: Action-related objects only. Effects of breaking the handle of the tool (A,B) or the object (C,D). Mean accuracies for action-related objects as a function of whether the tool handle (A) or the object handle (C) was broken compared to when both handles were intact. Mean patient accuracies (B,D) with error bars denote SE. Asterisks denote significance (**p < 0.01).
Mentions: There were reliable main effects of side of tool, F(1,16) = 9.33 p = 0.008, = 0.368 (ipsilesional > contralesional) and patient, F(7,16) = 6.08 p = 0.001, = 0.727. The interaction between intact/broken handle and side of tool was reliable, F(1,16) = 12.90, p = 0.002, = 0.446. When both handles were intact, there was better performance when the tool was presented on the contralesional side relative to when it was presented on the ipsilesional side, t(23) = 3.84, p = 0.001 (Figure 4A), while there was no reliable effect of the positioning of the tool when the tool handle was broken. The side of tool by patient interaction, F(7,16) = 2.84, p = 0.040, = 0.554, was also significant (Figure 4B). Patients differed in the degree to which they reported more stimuli when the tool was on the ipsilesional compared to when the tool was on the contralesional side; these effects were present for all but one patient (P1).

Bottom Line: In line with previous research (e.g., Riddoch et al., 2006), extinction was reduced when action-related object pairs and when unrelated tool pairs were presented compared to unrelated object pairs.In addition, performance with action-related objects decreased when the tool appeared on the ipsilesional side compared to when it was on the contralesional side, but only when the tool handle was intact.This attentional capture effect is mediated by the affordance to the intact tool.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Birmingham Birmingham, UK.

ABSTRACT
Previous studies have shown that visual extinction can be reduced if two objects are positioned to "afford" an action. Here we tested if this affordance effect was disrupted by "breaking" the affordance, i.e., if one of the objects actively used in the action had a broken handle. We assessed the effects of broken affordance on recovery from extinction in eight patients with right hemisphere lesions and left-sided extinction. Patients viewed object pairs that were or were not commonly used together and that were positioned for left- or right-hand actions. In the unrelated pair conditions, either two tools or two objects were presented. In line with previous research (e.g., Riddoch et al., 2006), extinction was reduced when action-related object pairs and when unrelated tool pairs were presented compared to unrelated object pairs. There was no significant difference in recovery rate between action-related (object-tool) and unrelated tool pairs. In addition, performance with action-related objects decreased when the tool appeared on the ipsilesional side compared to when it was on the contralesional side, but only when the tool handle was intact. There were minimal effects of breaking the handle of an object rather than a tool, and there was no effect of breaking the handle on either tools or objects on single item trials. The data suggest that breaking the handle of a tool lessens the degree to which it captures attention, with this attentional capture being strongest when the tool appears on the ipsilesional side. The capture of attention by the ipsilesional item then reduces the chance of detecting the contralesional stimulus. This attentional capture effect is mediated by the affordance to the intact tool.

No MeSH data available.