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The Golden Age in Cancer Nanobiotechnology: Quo Vadis?

Conde J - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Harvard-MIT Division for Health Sciences and Technology, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Cambridge, MA , USA.

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Since Richard Feynman and his famous talk “There’s plenty of room at the bottom” in an American Physical Society meeting at Caltech in 1959, Nanotechnology has led to the development of novel materials and devices with a wide-range of applications, especially in imaging, diagnostics, and therapy, which contributed to the early detection and treatment of cancer and metastasis (Ferrari, ; Conde et al., ; Schroeder et al., )... A unique feature of nanomaterials in the nanometer range (such as high surface-to-volume ratio or size-dependent optical properties) is that they are radically different from those of their bulk materials and with a huge potential to be used in the clinical field for disease diagnostics and therapeutics (Kim, ; Heath and Davis, )... Smart and multifunctional nanomaterials are one of those nanosystems that represent non-toxic and multipurpose mediators for a variety of biomedical applications, such as diagnostic and imaging assays (Cao et al., ; Conde et al., ; Kim et al., ), phototherapy and radiotherapy improvement (Hainfeld et al., ; Oh et al., ), as well as tumor targeting (Conde et al.,, , ), gene silencing (Conde et al.,, ,; Jiang et al., ), and drug delivery (Gibson et al., ; Han et al., ; Lai et al., ; Conde et al., )... Nanotechnology will undoubtedly be crucial for identifying useful drug target candidates and for validating their importance and efficacy in disease states, such as cancer (Conde et al., )... However, after three decades of substantial investment around the world, we are often asked what Nano can do beyond discovering new systems and methods to produce innovative materials? Although all studies described so far provide an important baseline level of data in support of the effectiveness and safety of nanomaterials, we wonder what have we learned so far? And most important to learn what approaches are proving fruitful results in turning promising clinical data into treatment realities (Conde et al., )... A recurrent problem that we can find in literature is that the majority of studies on nanomaterials do not consider the final application to guide the design of nanomaterials... Only a very small portion of all nanomaterials were produced to improve a bench-to-bedside approach to translational research... Outcomes like this must be followed by extensive laboratory work, which results in improved screening procedures and a new therapy of great potential, although the final product should always be part of a two-way interaction between laboratory scientists and clinicians... With chemists, biologists, and materials scientists working together with clinicians and engineers, but especially with “translational entrepreneurs” new solutions to crucial nanobiomedical problems will hopefully be found (Conde et al., )... Certainly, 7 years from the beginning of the National Nanotechnology Initiative, there appears to be a diminutive sign of a nanotechnology-based industry, although important amounts of R&D are being assumed by several industries... In fact, more than 30% of the new medical products recently approved by the FDA are combination of products previously approved... Intense debates about the safety of nanoscale science are likely to endure for many years until a sufficiently strong foundation of applications in the field exists on which to base long-term decisions.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The golden age in cancer nanobiotechnology: promises and pitfalls. After a decade of substantial investment around the world, we are often asked what nano can do beyond discovering new systems and methods to produce novel materials? Although all studies described so far provide a baseline level of data in support of the effectiveness and safety of nanomaterials, we wonder what have we learned so far? Which new tools lead to new Nanoscience? Where are the commercial products on Nanotechnology? Is nanotechnology truly the next trillion-dollar market?
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Figure 1: The golden age in cancer nanobiotechnology: promises and pitfalls. After a decade of substantial investment around the world, we are often asked what nano can do beyond discovering new systems and methods to produce novel materials? Although all studies described so far provide a baseline level of data in support of the effectiveness and safety of nanomaterials, we wonder what have we learned so far? Which new tools lead to new Nanoscience? Where are the commercial products on Nanotechnology? Is nanotechnology truly the next trillion-dollar market?

Mentions: A unique feature of nanomaterials in the nanometer range (such as high surface-to-volume ratio or size-dependent optical properties) is that they are radically different from those of their bulk materials and with a huge potential to be used in the clinical field for disease diagnostics and therapeutics (Kim, 2007; Heath and Davis, 2008). The most common bioapplications in which nanomaterials and nanoparticles have been used so far are labeling, delivering, heating, sensing, and detection (Sperling et al., 2008), using several approaches, such as gene delivery, tumor targeting, or drug delivery, especially in cancer (Figure 1).


The Golden Age in Cancer Nanobiotechnology: Quo Vadis?

Conde J - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2015)

The golden age in cancer nanobiotechnology: promises and pitfalls. After a decade of substantial investment around the world, we are often asked what nano can do beyond discovering new systems and methods to produce novel materials? Although all studies described so far provide a baseline level of data in support of the effectiveness and safety of nanomaterials, we wonder what have we learned so far? Which new tools lead to new Nanoscience? Where are the commercial products on Nanotechnology? Is nanotechnology truly the next trillion-dollar market?
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585264&req=5

Figure 1: The golden age in cancer nanobiotechnology: promises and pitfalls. After a decade of substantial investment around the world, we are often asked what nano can do beyond discovering new systems and methods to produce novel materials? Although all studies described so far provide a baseline level of data in support of the effectiveness and safety of nanomaterials, we wonder what have we learned so far? Which new tools lead to new Nanoscience? Where are the commercial products on Nanotechnology? Is nanotechnology truly the next trillion-dollar market?
Mentions: A unique feature of nanomaterials in the nanometer range (such as high surface-to-volume ratio or size-dependent optical properties) is that they are radically different from those of their bulk materials and with a huge potential to be used in the clinical field for disease diagnostics and therapeutics (Kim, 2007; Heath and Davis, 2008). The most common bioapplications in which nanomaterials and nanoparticles have been used so far are labeling, delivering, heating, sensing, and detection (Sperling et al., 2008), using several approaches, such as gene delivery, tumor targeting, or drug delivery, especially in cancer (Figure 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Harvard-MIT Division for Health Sciences and Technology, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Cambridge, MA , USA.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Since Richard Feynman and his famous talk “There’s plenty of room at the bottom” in an American Physical Society meeting at Caltech in 1959, Nanotechnology has led to the development of novel materials and devices with a wide-range of applications, especially in imaging, diagnostics, and therapy, which contributed to the early detection and treatment of cancer and metastasis (Ferrari, ; Conde et al., ; Schroeder et al., )... A unique feature of nanomaterials in the nanometer range (such as high surface-to-volume ratio or size-dependent optical properties) is that they are radically different from those of their bulk materials and with a huge potential to be used in the clinical field for disease diagnostics and therapeutics (Kim, ; Heath and Davis, )... Smart and multifunctional nanomaterials are one of those nanosystems that represent non-toxic and multipurpose mediators for a variety of biomedical applications, such as diagnostic and imaging assays (Cao et al., ; Conde et al., ; Kim et al., ), phototherapy and radiotherapy improvement (Hainfeld et al., ; Oh et al., ), as well as tumor targeting (Conde et al.,, , ), gene silencing (Conde et al.,, ,; Jiang et al., ), and drug delivery (Gibson et al., ; Han et al., ; Lai et al., ; Conde et al., )... Nanotechnology will undoubtedly be crucial for identifying useful drug target candidates and for validating their importance and efficacy in disease states, such as cancer (Conde et al., )... However, after three decades of substantial investment around the world, we are often asked what Nano can do beyond discovering new systems and methods to produce innovative materials? Although all studies described so far provide an important baseline level of data in support of the effectiveness and safety of nanomaterials, we wonder what have we learned so far? And most important to learn what approaches are proving fruitful results in turning promising clinical data into treatment realities (Conde et al., )... A recurrent problem that we can find in literature is that the majority of studies on nanomaterials do not consider the final application to guide the design of nanomaterials... Only a very small portion of all nanomaterials were produced to improve a bench-to-bedside approach to translational research... Outcomes like this must be followed by extensive laboratory work, which results in improved screening procedures and a new therapy of great potential, although the final product should always be part of a two-way interaction between laboratory scientists and clinicians... With chemists, biologists, and materials scientists working together with clinicians and engineers, but especially with “translational entrepreneurs” new solutions to crucial nanobiomedical problems will hopefully be found (Conde et al., )... Certainly, 7 years from the beginning of the National Nanotechnology Initiative, there appears to be a diminutive sign of a nanotechnology-based industry, although important amounts of R&D are being assumed by several industries... In fact, more than 30% of the new medical products recently approved by the FDA are combination of products previously approved... Intense debates about the safety of nanoscale science are likely to endure for many years until a sufficiently strong foundation of applications in the field exists on which to base long-term decisions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus