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Infant discrimination of humanoid robots.

Matsuda G, Ishiguro H, Hiraki K - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Results showed that all age groups predominantly looked at the robot and at the face area, and that infants aged over 9 months watched the goal area for longer than the body area.There was no difference in looking times and areas focused on between the human and the android.These findings suggest that 6- to 14-month-olds are unable to discriminate between the human and the android, although they can distinguish the mechanical robot from the human.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Education and General Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Kyoto, Japan ; Department of General Systems Studies, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Recently, extremely humanlike robots called "androids" have been developed, some of which are already being used in the field of entertainment. In the context of psychological studies, androids are expected to be used in the future as fully controllable human stimuli to investigate human nature. In this study, we used an android to examine infant discrimination ability between human beings and non-human agents. Participants (N = 42 infants) were assigned to three groups based on their age, i.e., 6- to 8-month-olds, 9- to 11-month-olds, and 12- to 14-month-olds, and took part in a preferential looking paradigm. Of three types of agents involved in the paradigm-a human, an android modeled on the human, and a mechanical-looking robot made from the android-two at a time were presented side-by-side as they performed a grasping action. Infants' looking behavior was measured using an eye tracking system, and the amount of time spent focusing on each of three areas of interest (face, goal, and body) was analyzed. Results showed that all age groups predominantly looked at the robot and at the face area, and that infants aged over 9 months watched the goal area for longer than the body area. There was no difference in looking times and areas focused on between the human and the android. These findings suggest that 6- to 14-month-olds are unable to discriminate between the human and the android, although they can distinguish the mechanical robot from the human.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Agents used as experimental stimuli. The android was designed to have the likeness of the human actor, and was identical in internal architecture to the robot. The original face of the robot was covered with a plastic mask to conceal its somewhat bizarre appearance, with naked eyeballs and gums.
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Figure 1: Agents used as experimental stimuli. The android was designed to have the likeness of the human actor, and was identical in internal architecture to the robot. The original face of the robot was covered with a plastic mask to conceal its somewhat bizarre appearance, with naked eyeballs and gums.

Mentions: The visual stimuli were three different black and white video clips (800 × 800 pixels, 30 fps) that depicted one of three agents (a human, an android, or a mechanical robot) performing a grasping action with their right hand. Figure 1 shows example frames of each video clip. These clips were made from stimuli used in a previous study (Saygin et al., 2011).


Infant discrimination of humanoid robots.

Matsuda G, Ishiguro H, Hiraki K - Front Psychol (2015)

Agents used as experimental stimuli. The android was designed to have the likeness of the human actor, and was identical in internal architecture to the robot. The original face of the robot was covered with a plastic mask to conceal its somewhat bizarre appearance, with naked eyeballs and gums.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585262&req=5

Figure 1: Agents used as experimental stimuli. The android was designed to have the likeness of the human actor, and was identical in internal architecture to the robot. The original face of the robot was covered with a plastic mask to conceal its somewhat bizarre appearance, with naked eyeballs and gums.
Mentions: The visual stimuli were three different black and white video clips (800 × 800 pixels, 30 fps) that depicted one of three agents (a human, an android, or a mechanical robot) performing a grasping action with their right hand. Figure 1 shows example frames of each video clip. These clips were made from stimuli used in a previous study (Saygin et al., 2011).

Bottom Line: Results showed that all age groups predominantly looked at the robot and at the face area, and that infants aged over 9 months watched the goal area for longer than the body area.There was no difference in looking times and areas focused on between the human and the android.These findings suggest that 6- to 14-month-olds are unable to discriminate between the human and the android, although they can distinguish the mechanical robot from the human.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Education and General Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Kyoto, Japan ; Department of General Systems Studies, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Recently, extremely humanlike robots called "androids" have been developed, some of which are already being used in the field of entertainment. In the context of psychological studies, androids are expected to be used in the future as fully controllable human stimuli to investigate human nature. In this study, we used an android to examine infant discrimination ability between human beings and non-human agents. Participants (N = 42 infants) were assigned to three groups based on their age, i.e., 6- to 8-month-olds, 9- to 11-month-olds, and 12- to 14-month-olds, and took part in a preferential looking paradigm. Of three types of agents involved in the paradigm-a human, an android modeled on the human, and a mechanical-looking robot made from the android-two at a time were presented side-by-side as they performed a grasping action. Infants' looking behavior was measured using an eye tracking system, and the amount of time spent focusing on each of three areas of interest (face, goal, and body) was analyzed. Results showed that all age groups predominantly looked at the robot and at the face area, and that infants aged over 9 months watched the goal area for longer than the body area. There was no difference in looking times and areas focused on between the human and the android. These findings suggest that 6- to 14-month-olds are unable to discriminate between the human and the android, although they can distinguish the mechanical robot from the human.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus