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Mannitol metabolism during pathogenic fungal-host interactions under stressed conditions.

Meena M, Prasad V, Zehra A, Gupta VK, Upadhyay RS - Front Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: The metabolic pathways for mannitol biosynthesis and catabolism have been characterized in filamentous fungi by direct diminishment of fructose-6-phosphate into mannitol-1-phosphate including a mannitol-1-phosphate phosphatase catalyst.In plants mannitol is integrated from mannose-6-phosphate to mannitol-1-phosphate, which then dephosphorylates to mannitol.The enzyme mannitol dehydrogenase plays a key role in host-pathogen interactions and must be co-localized with pathogen-secreted mannitol to resist the infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Botany, Banaras Hindu University Varanasi, India.

ABSTRACT
Numerous plants and fungi produce mannitol, which may serve as an osmolyte or metabolic store; furthermore, mannitol also acts as a powerful quencher of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Some phytopathogenic fungi use mannitol to stifle ROS-mediated plant resistance. Mannitol is essential in pathogenesis to balance cell reinforcements produced by both plants and animals. Mannitol likewise serves as a source of reducing power, managing coenzymes, and controlling cytoplasmic pH by going about as a sink or hotspot for protons. The metabolic pathways for mannitol biosynthesis and catabolism have been characterized in filamentous fungi by direct diminishment of fructose-6-phosphate into mannitol-1-phosphate including a mannitol-1-phosphate phosphatase catalyst. In plants mannitol is integrated from mannose-6-phosphate to mannitol-1-phosphate, which then dephosphorylates to mannitol. The enzyme mannitol dehydrogenase plays a key role in host-pathogen interactions and must be co-localized with pathogen-secreted mannitol to resist the infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Functions of mannitol and mannitol dehydrogenase (MTD) during plant–pathogen interactions. (A) When pathogens uses mannitol to circumvent plant defense system it quenches the ROS production and the processes marked with dotted arrows do not occur, leading to pathogen replication. (B) When plants use MTD to metabolize mannitol produced by pathogens then the processes marked with dotted arrows occur and provide resistance against the pathogen.
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Figure 3: Functions of mannitol and mannitol dehydrogenase (MTD) during plant–pathogen interactions. (A) When pathogens uses mannitol to circumvent plant defense system it quenches the ROS production and the processes marked with dotted arrows do not occur, leading to pathogen replication. (B) When plants use MTD to metabolize mannitol produced by pathogens then the processes marked with dotted arrows occur and provide resistance against the pathogen.

Mentions: A key indication that mannitol may have a part in plant–pathogen communications came from the observation that the celery mannitol catabolic catalyst MTD was a pathogen-induced protein in celery (Figure 3; Williamson et al., 1995). Tobacco does not produce mannitol, MTD and corresponding protein and RNA accumulation is induced in fungus infected tobacco (Jennings et al., 1998).


Mannitol metabolism during pathogenic fungal-host interactions under stressed conditions.

Meena M, Prasad V, Zehra A, Gupta VK, Upadhyay RS - Front Microbiol (2015)

Functions of mannitol and mannitol dehydrogenase (MTD) during plant–pathogen interactions. (A) When pathogens uses mannitol to circumvent plant defense system it quenches the ROS production and the processes marked with dotted arrows do not occur, leading to pathogen replication. (B) When plants use MTD to metabolize mannitol produced by pathogens then the processes marked with dotted arrows occur and provide resistance against the pathogen.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585237&req=5

Figure 3: Functions of mannitol and mannitol dehydrogenase (MTD) during plant–pathogen interactions. (A) When pathogens uses mannitol to circumvent plant defense system it quenches the ROS production and the processes marked with dotted arrows do not occur, leading to pathogen replication. (B) When plants use MTD to metabolize mannitol produced by pathogens then the processes marked with dotted arrows occur and provide resistance against the pathogen.
Mentions: A key indication that mannitol may have a part in plant–pathogen communications came from the observation that the celery mannitol catabolic catalyst MTD was a pathogen-induced protein in celery (Figure 3; Williamson et al., 1995). Tobacco does not produce mannitol, MTD and corresponding protein and RNA accumulation is induced in fungus infected tobacco (Jennings et al., 1998).

Bottom Line: The metabolic pathways for mannitol biosynthesis and catabolism have been characterized in filamentous fungi by direct diminishment of fructose-6-phosphate into mannitol-1-phosphate including a mannitol-1-phosphate phosphatase catalyst.In plants mannitol is integrated from mannose-6-phosphate to mannitol-1-phosphate, which then dephosphorylates to mannitol.The enzyme mannitol dehydrogenase plays a key role in host-pathogen interactions and must be co-localized with pathogen-secreted mannitol to resist the infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Botany, Banaras Hindu University Varanasi, India.

ABSTRACT
Numerous plants and fungi produce mannitol, which may serve as an osmolyte or metabolic store; furthermore, mannitol also acts as a powerful quencher of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Some phytopathogenic fungi use mannitol to stifle ROS-mediated plant resistance. Mannitol is essential in pathogenesis to balance cell reinforcements produced by both plants and animals. Mannitol likewise serves as a source of reducing power, managing coenzymes, and controlling cytoplasmic pH by going about as a sink or hotspot for protons. The metabolic pathways for mannitol biosynthesis and catabolism have been characterized in filamentous fungi by direct diminishment of fructose-6-phosphate into mannitol-1-phosphate including a mannitol-1-phosphate phosphatase catalyst. In plants mannitol is integrated from mannose-6-phosphate to mannitol-1-phosphate, which then dephosphorylates to mannitol. The enzyme mannitol dehydrogenase plays a key role in host-pathogen interactions and must be co-localized with pathogen-secreted mannitol to resist the infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus