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Influence of adult attachment insecurities on parenting self-esteem: the mediating role of dyadic adjustment.

Calvo V, Bianco F - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Path analysis was used to design and test a theoretical integrative model, achieving a good fit with the data.Parenting satisfaction is positively influenced by parenting self-efficacy and negatively affected by child's age.Our findings are in line with the theoretical expectations and have promising implications for future research and intervention programs designed to improve parenting self-esteem.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Pedagogy and Applied Psychology, University of Padova Padova, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Background: Parenting self-esteem includes two global components, parents' self-efficacy and satisfaction with their parental role, and has a crucial role in parent-child interactions. The purpose of this study was to develop an integrative model linking adult attachment insecurities, dyadic adjustment, and parenting self-esteem.

Methods: The study involved 118 pairs (236 subjects) of heterosexual parents of a firstborn child aged 0-6 years. They were administered the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised (ECR-R) questionnaire, the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, and the Parenting Sense of Competence Scale.

Results: Path analysis was used to design and test a theoretical integrative model, achieving a good fit with the data. Findings showed that dyadic adjustment mediates the negative influence on parenting self-efficacy of both attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance. Parenting satisfaction is positively influenced by parenting self-efficacy and negatively affected by child's age. Attachment anxiety negatively influences parenting satisfaction.

Conclusion: Our findings are in line with the theoretical expectations and have promising implications for future research and intervention programs designed to improve parenting self-esteem.

No MeSH data available.


Theoretical model linking adult attachment, dyadic adjustment, parenting self-esteem. Plus and minus signs indicate the hypothesized direction of the proposed paths.
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Figure 1: Theoretical model linking adult attachment, dyadic adjustment, parenting self-esteem. Plus and minus signs indicate the hypothesized direction of the proposed paths.

Mentions: Our theoretical integrative model is outlined in Figure 1.


Influence of adult attachment insecurities on parenting self-esteem: the mediating role of dyadic adjustment.

Calvo V, Bianco F - Front Psychol (2015)

Theoretical model linking adult attachment, dyadic adjustment, parenting self-esteem. Plus and minus signs indicate the hypothesized direction of the proposed paths.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585223&req=5

Figure 1: Theoretical model linking adult attachment, dyadic adjustment, parenting self-esteem. Plus and minus signs indicate the hypothesized direction of the proposed paths.
Mentions: Our theoretical integrative model is outlined in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Path analysis was used to design and test a theoretical integrative model, achieving a good fit with the data.Parenting satisfaction is positively influenced by parenting self-efficacy and negatively affected by child's age.Our findings are in line with the theoretical expectations and have promising implications for future research and intervention programs designed to improve parenting self-esteem.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Pedagogy and Applied Psychology, University of Padova Padova, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Background: Parenting self-esteem includes two global components, parents' self-efficacy and satisfaction with their parental role, and has a crucial role in parent-child interactions. The purpose of this study was to develop an integrative model linking adult attachment insecurities, dyadic adjustment, and parenting self-esteem.

Methods: The study involved 118 pairs (236 subjects) of heterosexual parents of a firstborn child aged 0-6 years. They were administered the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised (ECR-R) questionnaire, the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, and the Parenting Sense of Competence Scale.

Results: Path analysis was used to design and test a theoretical integrative model, achieving a good fit with the data. Findings showed that dyadic adjustment mediates the negative influence on parenting self-efficacy of both attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance. Parenting satisfaction is positively influenced by parenting self-efficacy and negatively affected by child's age. Attachment anxiety negatively influences parenting satisfaction.

Conclusion: Our findings are in line with the theoretical expectations and have promising implications for future research and intervention programs designed to improve parenting self-esteem.

No MeSH data available.