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Investigation of the multifunctional gene AOP3 expands the regulatory network fine-tuning glucosinolate production in Arabidopsis.

Jensen LM, Kliebenstein DJ, Burow M - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: In this study, we use transgenic plants in combination with natural variation to investigate the regulatory role of the AOP3 gene found in GS-AOP locus previously suggested to contribute to the regulation of glucosinolate defense compounds.Phenotypic analysis and QTL mapping in F2 populations with different AOP3 transgenes support that the enzymatic function and the AOP3 RNA both play a significant role in controlling glucosinolate accumulation.Furthermore, we find different loci interacting with either the enzymatic activity or the RNA of AOP3 and thereby extend the regulatory network controlling glucosinolate accumulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DNRF Center DynaMo, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen Frederiksberg, Denmark ; Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen Frederiksberg, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping studies enable identification of loci that are part of regulatory networks controlling various phenotypes. Detailed investigations of genes within these loci are required to ultimately understand the function of individual genes and how they interact with other players in the network. In this study, we use transgenic plants in combination with natural variation to investigate the regulatory role of the AOP3 gene found in GS-AOP locus previously suggested to contribute to the regulation of glucosinolate defense compounds. Phenotypic analysis and QTL mapping in F2 populations with different AOP3 transgenes support that the enzymatic function and the AOP3 RNA both play a significant role in controlling glucosinolate accumulation. Furthermore, we find different loci interacting with either the enzymatic activity or the RNA of AOP3 and thereby extend the regulatory network controlling glucosinolate accumulation.

No MeSH data available.


Overview of the glucosinolate pathway and the enzymatic function of AOP3. Selected genes and intermediates in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis from methionine. Dependent on the status of GS-ELONG containing the different MAMs, methionine undergoes 1–6 chain elongation cycles before entering the core glucosinolate structure pathway. AOP3 catalyzes production of hydroxyalkyl glucosinolate from C3 side chained methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolate.
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Figure 1: Overview of the glucosinolate pathway and the enzymatic function of AOP3. Selected genes and intermediates in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis from methionine. Dependent on the status of GS-ELONG containing the different MAMs, methionine undergoes 1–6 chain elongation cycles before entering the core glucosinolate structure pathway. AOP3 catalyzes production of hydroxyalkyl glucosinolate from C3 side chained methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolate.

Mentions: One glucosinolate gene that appears to have extensive variation in its function depending upon the background variation is the glucosinolate biosynthetic gene AOP3 encoding a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase modifying glucosinolate side chains (Figure 1) (Mithen et al., 1995; Kliebenstein et al., 2001b,c). In addition to its enzymatic function, AOP3 is associated with an apparent regulatory control of aliphatic glucosinolate accumulation. Introgression lines and natural variation show that AOP3 increases glucosinolate accumulation compared to the AOP allele (Kliebenstein et al., 2001b; Rohr et al., 2009, 2012). A paralogous enzyme, AOP2, also has the ability to alter aliphatic glucosinolate levels (Mithen et al., 1995; Kliebenstein et al., 2001b; Wentzell et al., 2007; Burow et al., 2015). Introduction of a functional AOP2 into the AOPMAM1 background, Col-0, demonstrated the large potential of AOP2 to increase glucosinolate levels via an unknown mechanism (Wentzell et al., 2007). The specific role of AOP3 in controlling aliphatic glucosinolate accumulation is less well understood, even though more studies suggest a regulatory role (Kliebenstein et al., 2001a,b,c; Wentzell et al., 2007; Rohr et al., 2012).


Investigation of the multifunctional gene AOP3 expands the regulatory network fine-tuning glucosinolate production in Arabidopsis.

Jensen LM, Kliebenstein DJ, Burow M - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Overview of the glucosinolate pathway and the enzymatic function of AOP3. Selected genes and intermediates in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis from methionine. Dependent on the status of GS-ELONG containing the different MAMs, methionine undergoes 1–6 chain elongation cycles before entering the core glucosinolate structure pathway. AOP3 catalyzes production of hydroxyalkyl glucosinolate from C3 side chained methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolate.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585220&req=5

Figure 1: Overview of the glucosinolate pathway and the enzymatic function of AOP3. Selected genes and intermediates in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis from methionine. Dependent on the status of GS-ELONG containing the different MAMs, methionine undergoes 1–6 chain elongation cycles before entering the core glucosinolate structure pathway. AOP3 catalyzes production of hydroxyalkyl glucosinolate from C3 side chained methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolate.
Mentions: One glucosinolate gene that appears to have extensive variation in its function depending upon the background variation is the glucosinolate biosynthetic gene AOP3 encoding a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase modifying glucosinolate side chains (Figure 1) (Mithen et al., 1995; Kliebenstein et al., 2001b,c). In addition to its enzymatic function, AOP3 is associated with an apparent regulatory control of aliphatic glucosinolate accumulation. Introgression lines and natural variation show that AOP3 increases glucosinolate accumulation compared to the AOP allele (Kliebenstein et al., 2001b; Rohr et al., 2009, 2012). A paralogous enzyme, AOP2, also has the ability to alter aliphatic glucosinolate levels (Mithen et al., 1995; Kliebenstein et al., 2001b; Wentzell et al., 2007; Burow et al., 2015). Introduction of a functional AOP2 into the AOPMAM1 background, Col-0, demonstrated the large potential of AOP2 to increase glucosinolate levels via an unknown mechanism (Wentzell et al., 2007). The specific role of AOP3 in controlling aliphatic glucosinolate accumulation is less well understood, even though more studies suggest a regulatory role (Kliebenstein et al., 2001a,b,c; Wentzell et al., 2007; Rohr et al., 2012).

Bottom Line: In this study, we use transgenic plants in combination with natural variation to investigate the regulatory role of the AOP3 gene found in GS-AOP locus previously suggested to contribute to the regulation of glucosinolate defense compounds.Phenotypic analysis and QTL mapping in F2 populations with different AOP3 transgenes support that the enzymatic function and the AOP3 RNA both play a significant role in controlling glucosinolate accumulation.Furthermore, we find different loci interacting with either the enzymatic activity or the RNA of AOP3 and thereby extend the regulatory network controlling glucosinolate accumulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DNRF Center DynaMo, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen Frederiksberg, Denmark ; Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen Frederiksberg, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping studies enable identification of loci that are part of regulatory networks controlling various phenotypes. Detailed investigations of genes within these loci are required to ultimately understand the function of individual genes and how they interact with other players in the network. In this study, we use transgenic plants in combination with natural variation to investigate the regulatory role of the AOP3 gene found in GS-AOP locus previously suggested to contribute to the regulation of glucosinolate defense compounds. Phenotypic analysis and QTL mapping in F2 populations with different AOP3 transgenes support that the enzymatic function and the AOP3 RNA both play a significant role in controlling glucosinolate accumulation. Furthermore, we find different loci interacting with either the enzymatic activity or the RNA of AOP3 and thereby extend the regulatory network controlling glucosinolate accumulation.

No MeSH data available.