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Neural correlates of cognitive aging during the perception of facial age: the role of relatively distant and local texture information.

Komes J, Schweinberger SR, Wiese H - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Older participants did not show a corresponding effect.ERPs yielded a trend toward reduced N170 inversion effects in older relative to younger adults independent of face age.The reduced N170 inversion effect in older adults may reflect age-related changes in neural correlates of face perception.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DFG Research Unit Person Perception, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena Jena, Germany ; Department of Psychology, Durham University Durham, UK.

ABSTRACT
Previous event-related potential (ERP) research revealed that older relative to younger adults show reduced inversion effects in the N170 (with more negative amplitudes for inverted than upright faces), suggestive of impairments in face perception. However, as these studies used young to middle-aged faces only, this finding may reflect preferential processing of own- relative to other-age faces rather than age-related decline. We conducted an ERP study in which young and older participants categorized young and old upright or inverted faces by age. Stimuli were presented either unfiltered or low-pass filtered at 30, 20, or 10 cycles per image (CPI). Response times revealed larger inversion effects, with slower responses for inverted faces, for young faces in young participants. Older participants did not show a corresponding effect. ERPs yielded a trend toward reduced N170 inversion effects in older relative to younger adults independent of face age. Moreover, larger inversion effects for young relative to old faces were detected, and filtering resulted in smaller N170 amplitudes. The reduced N170 inversion effect in older adults may reflect age-related changes in neural correlates of face perception. A smaller N170 inversion effect for old faces may indicate that facial changes with age hamper early face perception stages.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Examples of the face stimuli used in the present experiment.
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Figure 1: Examples of the face stimuli used in the present experiment.

Mentions: Stimuli consisted of 50 old (mean age = 77.5 years, SD = 6.7) and 50 young Caucasian faces (M = 22.1 years, SD = 2.42), 50% female respectively, and all taken from the CAL/PAL database (Minear and Park, 2004). All pictures displayed front views of neutral faces and were edited in Adobe Photoshop™ to remove all information (hair, clothing, background, etc.) apart from the face, which was subsequently pasted in front of a black background. All stimuli were framed within an area of 170 × 216 pixels (6.0 × 7.6 cm), corresponding to a visual angle of 3.8° × 4.8° at a viewing distance of 90 cm. Images were then filtered with the FourierImage software developed by Risto Näsänen (http://nasanen.info/Software.html) using an exponential low-pass filter with cut-off frequencies set to 30, 20, or 10 cycles per image (CPI). Furthermore, all stimuli were presented in both upright and inverted orientation, as well as in unfiltered and three low-pass filtered versions, resulting in eight images of each individual face (see Figure 1 for stimulus examples).


Neural correlates of cognitive aging during the perception of facial age: the role of relatively distant and local texture information.

Komes J, Schweinberger SR, Wiese H - Front Psychol (2015)

Examples of the face stimuli used in the present experiment.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585215&req=5

Figure 1: Examples of the face stimuli used in the present experiment.
Mentions: Stimuli consisted of 50 old (mean age = 77.5 years, SD = 6.7) and 50 young Caucasian faces (M = 22.1 years, SD = 2.42), 50% female respectively, and all taken from the CAL/PAL database (Minear and Park, 2004). All pictures displayed front views of neutral faces and were edited in Adobe Photoshop™ to remove all information (hair, clothing, background, etc.) apart from the face, which was subsequently pasted in front of a black background. All stimuli were framed within an area of 170 × 216 pixels (6.0 × 7.6 cm), corresponding to a visual angle of 3.8° × 4.8° at a viewing distance of 90 cm. Images were then filtered with the FourierImage software developed by Risto Näsänen (http://nasanen.info/Software.html) using an exponential low-pass filter with cut-off frequencies set to 30, 20, or 10 cycles per image (CPI). Furthermore, all stimuli were presented in both upright and inverted orientation, as well as in unfiltered and three low-pass filtered versions, resulting in eight images of each individual face (see Figure 1 for stimulus examples).

Bottom Line: Older participants did not show a corresponding effect.ERPs yielded a trend toward reduced N170 inversion effects in older relative to younger adults independent of face age.The reduced N170 inversion effect in older adults may reflect age-related changes in neural correlates of face perception.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DFG Research Unit Person Perception, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena Jena, Germany ; Department of Psychology, Durham University Durham, UK.

ABSTRACT
Previous event-related potential (ERP) research revealed that older relative to younger adults show reduced inversion effects in the N170 (with more negative amplitudes for inverted than upright faces), suggestive of impairments in face perception. However, as these studies used young to middle-aged faces only, this finding may reflect preferential processing of own- relative to other-age faces rather than age-related decline. We conducted an ERP study in which young and older participants categorized young and old upright or inverted faces by age. Stimuli were presented either unfiltered or low-pass filtered at 30, 20, or 10 cycles per image (CPI). Response times revealed larger inversion effects, with slower responses for inverted faces, for young faces in young participants. Older participants did not show a corresponding effect. ERPs yielded a trend toward reduced N170 inversion effects in older relative to younger adults independent of face age. Moreover, larger inversion effects for young relative to old faces were detected, and filtering resulted in smaller N170 amplitudes. The reduced N170 inversion effect in older adults may reflect age-related changes in neural correlates of face perception. A smaller N170 inversion effect for old faces may indicate that facial changes with age hamper early face perception stages.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus