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Atypical delayed auditory feedback effect and Lombard effect on speech production in high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder.

Lin IF, Mochida T, Asada K, Ayaya S, Kumagaya S, Kato M - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: We also examined feedforward control by adding loud pink noise to the auditory feedback, which led to increased vocal effort in producing speech.The results of Japanese speakers show that, compared with neurotypical (NT) individuals, high-functioning adults with ASD (including Asperger's disorder, autistic disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified) were more affected by delayed auditory feedback but less affected by external noise.These findings indicate that, in contrast to NT individuals, those with ASD relied more on feedback control than on feedforward control in speech production, which is consistent with the hypothesis that this population exhibits attenuated Bayesian priors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human and Information Science Laboratory, NTT Communication Science Laboratories Atsugi, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show impaired social interaction and communication, which may be related to their difficulties in speech production. To investigate the mechanisms of atypical speech production in this population, we examined feedback control by delaying the auditory feedback of their own speech, which degraded speech fluency. We also examined feedforward control by adding loud pink noise to the auditory feedback, which led to increased vocal effort in producing speech. The results of Japanese speakers show that, compared with neurotypical (NT) individuals, high-functioning adults with ASD (including Asperger's disorder, autistic disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified) were more affected by delayed auditory feedback but less affected by external noise. These findings indicate that, in contrast to NT individuals, those with ASD relied more on feedback control than on feedforward control in speech production, which is consistent with the hypothesis that this population exhibits attenuated Bayesian priors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The phonation duration and the sound pressure level measured for the quiet and noisy conditions in the two groups. When the participants’ own speech was sent back to them with background noise, both their phonation duration (A) and sound pressure level (B) increased, indicated as mean ± standard error. The Lombard effect, which was the increase in phonation duration and sound pressure level for the noisy condition (the rightmost bars), was significantly smaller in the ASD group (black bars) than in the control group (gray bars).
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Figure 2: The phonation duration and the sound pressure level measured for the quiet and noisy conditions in the two groups. When the participants’ own speech was sent back to them with background noise, both their phonation duration (A) and sound pressure level (B) increased, indicated as mean ± standard error. The Lombard effect, which was the increase in phonation duration and sound pressure level for the noisy condition (the rightmost bars), was significantly smaller in the ASD group (black bars) than in the control group (gray bars).

Mentions: As the result of some speech errors, there were only 13 instead of 14 spoken numbers in 2% of the sessions. The phonation duration and the sound pressure level (calculated as dB SPL) were used to evaluate the Lombard effect. For each participant, the phonation duration and the sound pressure level of the spoken words were averaged across repetitions and then averaged across different words (Figure 2).


Atypical delayed auditory feedback effect and Lombard effect on speech production in high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder.

Lin IF, Mochida T, Asada K, Ayaya S, Kumagaya S, Kato M - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

The phonation duration and the sound pressure level measured for the quiet and noisy conditions in the two groups. When the participants’ own speech was sent back to them with background noise, both their phonation duration (A) and sound pressure level (B) increased, indicated as mean ± standard error. The Lombard effect, which was the increase in phonation duration and sound pressure level for the noisy condition (the rightmost bars), was significantly smaller in the ASD group (black bars) than in the control group (gray bars).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585204&req=5

Figure 2: The phonation duration and the sound pressure level measured for the quiet and noisy conditions in the two groups. When the participants’ own speech was sent back to them with background noise, both their phonation duration (A) and sound pressure level (B) increased, indicated as mean ± standard error. The Lombard effect, which was the increase in phonation duration and sound pressure level for the noisy condition (the rightmost bars), was significantly smaller in the ASD group (black bars) than in the control group (gray bars).
Mentions: As the result of some speech errors, there were only 13 instead of 14 spoken numbers in 2% of the sessions. The phonation duration and the sound pressure level (calculated as dB SPL) were used to evaluate the Lombard effect. For each participant, the phonation duration and the sound pressure level of the spoken words were averaged across repetitions and then averaged across different words (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: We also examined feedforward control by adding loud pink noise to the auditory feedback, which led to increased vocal effort in producing speech.The results of Japanese speakers show that, compared with neurotypical (NT) individuals, high-functioning adults with ASD (including Asperger's disorder, autistic disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified) were more affected by delayed auditory feedback but less affected by external noise.These findings indicate that, in contrast to NT individuals, those with ASD relied more on feedback control than on feedforward control in speech production, which is consistent with the hypothesis that this population exhibits attenuated Bayesian priors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human and Information Science Laboratory, NTT Communication Science Laboratories Atsugi, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show impaired social interaction and communication, which may be related to their difficulties in speech production. To investigate the mechanisms of atypical speech production in this population, we examined feedback control by delaying the auditory feedback of their own speech, which degraded speech fluency. We also examined feedforward control by adding loud pink noise to the auditory feedback, which led to increased vocal effort in producing speech. The results of Japanese speakers show that, compared with neurotypical (NT) individuals, high-functioning adults with ASD (including Asperger's disorder, autistic disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified) were more affected by delayed auditory feedback but less affected by external noise. These findings indicate that, in contrast to NT individuals, those with ASD relied more on feedback control than on feedforward control in speech production, which is consistent with the hypothesis that this population exhibits attenuated Bayesian priors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus