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Genome-wide analysis and expression profiling under heat and drought treatments of HSP70 gene family in soybean (Glycine max L.).

Zhang L, Zhao HK, Dong QL, Zhang YY, Wang YM, Li HY, Xing GJ, Li QY, Dong YS - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the expression of some of the duplicate genes was partially redundant, while others showed functional diversity.The quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of the 61 soybean HSP70 genes confirmed their stress-inducible expression patterns under both drought and heat stress.These findings provide a thorough overview of the evolution and modification of the GmHSP70 gene family, which will help to determine the functional characteristics of the HSP70 genes in soybean growth and development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Agro-Biotechnology Research Institute, Jilin Academy of Agricultural Sciences Changchun, China.

ABSTRACT
Heat shock proteins (HSPs) perform a fundamental role in protecting plants against abiotic stresses. Previous studies have made great efforts in the functional analysis of individual family members, but there has not yet been an overall analysis or expression profiling of the HSP70 gene family in soybeans (Glycine max L.). In this study, an investigation of the soybean genome revealed 61 putative HSP70 genes, which were evaluated. These genes were classified into eight sub-families, denoted I-VIII, based on a phylogenetic analysis. In each sub-family, the constituent parts of the gene structure and motif were relatively conserved. These GmHSP70 genes were distributed unequally on 17 of the 20 chromosomes. The analysis of the expression profiles showed that 53 of the 61 GmHSP70 genes were differentially expressed across the 14 tissues. However, most of the GmHSP70s were differentially expressed in a tissue-specific expression pattern. Furthermore, the expression of some of the duplicate genes was partially redundant, while others showed functional diversity. The quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of the 61 soybean HSP70 genes confirmed their stress-inducible expression patterns under both drought and heat stress. These findings provide a thorough overview of the evolution and modification of the GmHSP70 gene family, which will help to determine the functional characteristics of the HSP70 genes in soybean growth and development.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic tree of full-length HSP70 proteins from soybean, Arabidopsis and rice. The 61 soybean, 18 Arabidopsis and 32 rice HSP70 protein sequences were aligned by Clustal X 1.83 and the phylogenetic tree was constructed using MEGA5.0 by the Neighbor-Joining (NJ) method. The Bootstrap value was 1000 replicates. Each HSP70 subfamily is indicated by a specific color.
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Figure 4: Phylogenetic tree of full-length HSP70 proteins from soybean, Arabidopsis and rice. The 61 soybean, 18 Arabidopsis and 32 rice HSP70 protein sequences were aligned by Clustal X 1.83 and the phylogenetic tree was constructed using MEGA5.0 by the Neighbor-Joining (NJ) method. The Bootstrap value was 1000 replicates. Each HSP70 subfamily is indicated by a specific color.

Mentions: The development of comparative genomics has enabled the analysis of the same protein families among different species. The NJ phylogenetic tree was constructed using 111 full-length protein sequences in order to reveal the evolutionary relationships among soybean (61), Arabidopsis (18), and rice (32) HSP70 proteins (Figure 4 and Additional File 9) in our study. The 18 Arabidopsis HSP70 proteins were identified from the TAIR database, and, according to previous studies, the AtHSP70 gene family is divided into five sub-families (Lin et al., 2001). There were 32 OsHSP70 family members identified from the TIGR database, while rice contained six sub-families (Jung et al., 2013; Sarkar et al., 2013). Therefore, based on their phylogenetic relationships, the combined soybean, rice, and Arabidopsis phylogenetic trees can be divided into eight distinct sub-families (class I–VIII; Figure 4). Among the eight clusters, class I was the largest, containing 48 members, and composed of 29 members from soybean, 13 from rice, and 6 from Arabidopsis. Class VII was the second largest, containing 10 members from soybean, four from rice, and four from Arabidopsis. Class II contained 13 members (four soybean, six rice, and three Arabidopsis members). The HSP70 members in Class III were six soybean, five rice, and four in Arabidopsis. Class IV was a small sub-family, which only included one soybean HSP70 gene (Glyma07g32921), and no rice or Arabidopsis. Class V contained three members: one soybean, one rice, and one Arabidopsis. Class VI contained three rice and one soybean member. Class VIII only contained 9 soybean members. With the exceptions of classes IV and VIII, all of the other sub-families contained rice, Arabidopsis, and soybean HSP70 genes. These results suggest that the main characteristics of this family of plants were generated before the dicot/monocot split.


Genome-wide analysis and expression profiling under heat and drought treatments of HSP70 gene family in soybean (Glycine max L.).

Zhang L, Zhao HK, Dong QL, Zhang YY, Wang YM, Li HY, Xing GJ, Li QY, Dong YS - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Phylogenetic tree of full-length HSP70 proteins from soybean, Arabidopsis and rice. The 61 soybean, 18 Arabidopsis and 32 rice HSP70 protein sequences were aligned by Clustal X 1.83 and the phylogenetic tree was constructed using MEGA5.0 by the Neighbor-Joining (NJ) method. The Bootstrap value was 1000 replicates. Each HSP70 subfamily is indicated by a specific color.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585176&req=5

Figure 4: Phylogenetic tree of full-length HSP70 proteins from soybean, Arabidopsis and rice. The 61 soybean, 18 Arabidopsis and 32 rice HSP70 protein sequences were aligned by Clustal X 1.83 and the phylogenetic tree was constructed using MEGA5.0 by the Neighbor-Joining (NJ) method. The Bootstrap value was 1000 replicates. Each HSP70 subfamily is indicated by a specific color.
Mentions: The development of comparative genomics has enabled the analysis of the same protein families among different species. The NJ phylogenetic tree was constructed using 111 full-length protein sequences in order to reveal the evolutionary relationships among soybean (61), Arabidopsis (18), and rice (32) HSP70 proteins (Figure 4 and Additional File 9) in our study. The 18 Arabidopsis HSP70 proteins were identified from the TAIR database, and, according to previous studies, the AtHSP70 gene family is divided into five sub-families (Lin et al., 2001). There were 32 OsHSP70 family members identified from the TIGR database, while rice contained six sub-families (Jung et al., 2013; Sarkar et al., 2013). Therefore, based on their phylogenetic relationships, the combined soybean, rice, and Arabidopsis phylogenetic trees can be divided into eight distinct sub-families (class I–VIII; Figure 4). Among the eight clusters, class I was the largest, containing 48 members, and composed of 29 members from soybean, 13 from rice, and 6 from Arabidopsis. Class VII was the second largest, containing 10 members from soybean, four from rice, and four from Arabidopsis. Class II contained 13 members (four soybean, six rice, and three Arabidopsis members). The HSP70 members in Class III were six soybean, five rice, and four in Arabidopsis. Class IV was a small sub-family, which only included one soybean HSP70 gene (Glyma07g32921), and no rice or Arabidopsis. Class V contained three members: one soybean, one rice, and one Arabidopsis. Class VI contained three rice and one soybean member. Class VIII only contained 9 soybean members. With the exceptions of classes IV and VIII, all of the other sub-families contained rice, Arabidopsis, and soybean HSP70 genes. These results suggest that the main characteristics of this family of plants were generated before the dicot/monocot split.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the expression of some of the duplicate genes was partially redundant, while others showed functional diversity.The quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of the 61 soybean HSP70 genes confirmed their stress-inducible expression patterns under both drought and heat stress.These findings provide a thorough overview of the evolution and modification of the GmHSP70 gene family, which will help to determine the functional characteristics of the HSP70 genes in soybean growth and development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Agro-Biotechnology Research Institute, Jilin Academy of Agricultural Sciences Changchun, China.

ABSTRACT
Heat shock proteins (HSPs) perform a fundamental role in protecting plants against abiotic stresses. Previous studies have made great efforts in the functional analysis of individual family members, but there has not yet been an overall analysis or expression profiling of the HSP70 gene family in soybeans (Glycine max L.). In this study, an investigation of the soybean genome revealed 61 putative HSP70 genes, which were evaluated. These genes were classified into eight sub-families, denoted I-VIII, based on a phylogenetic analysis. In each sub-family, the constituent parts of the gene structure and motif were relatively conserved. These GmHSP70 genes were distributed unequally on 17 of the 20 chromosomes. The analysis of the expression profiles showed that 53 of the 61 GmHSP70 genes were differentially expressed across the 14 tissues. However, most of the GmHSP70s were differentially expressed in a tissue-specific expression pattern. Furthermore, the expression of some of the duplicate genes was partially redundant, while others showed functional diversity. The quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of the 61 soybean HSP70 genes confirmed their stress-inducible expression patterns under both drought and heat stress. These findings provide a thorough overview of the evolution and modification of the GmHSP70 gene family, which will help to determine the functional characteristics of the HSP70 genes in soybean growth and development.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus