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Bi-frontal transcranial alternating current stimulation in the ripple range reduced overnight forgetting.

Ambrus GG, Pisoni A, Primaßin A, Turi Z, Paulus W, Antal A - Front Cell Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: High frequency oscillations in the hippocampal structures recorded during sleep have been proved to be essential for long-term episodic memory consolidation in both animals and in humans.An associative word-pair learning test was used.Cued recall performance was investigated 10 min after training and the morning following the training session.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinic for Clinical Neurophysiology, University Medical Center, Georg-August-University of Göttingen Göttingen, Germany ; University Medical Center, Institute of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, Georg-August-University of Göttingen Göttingen, Germany ; Institute of Psychology, Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena Jena, Germany.

ABSTRACT
High frequency oscillations in the hippocampal structures recorded during sleep have been proved to be essential for long-term episodic memory consolidation in both animals and in humans. The aim of this study was to test if transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS) of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in the hippocampal ripple range, applied bi-frontally during encoding, could modulate declarative memory performance, measured immediately after encoding, and after a night's sleep. An associative word-pair learning test was used. During an evening encoding phase, participants received 1 mA 140 Hz tACS or sham stimulation over both DLPFCs for 10 min while being presented twice with a list of word-pairs. Cued recall performance was investigated 10 min after training and the morning following the training session. Forgetting from evening to morning was observed in the sham condition, but not in the 140 Hz stimulation condition. 140 Hz tACS during encoding may have an effect on the consolidation of declarative material.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Performance on the associative word-pair learning task. (A) A paired t-test revealed a significant difference in performance in the sham stimulation condition, indicating forgetting. No such difference could be observed in the active stimulation condition. (B) The difference in the number of correctly recalled words from evening to morning was shown to be significantly different between the stimulation conditions. Error bars denote SEM.
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Figure 2: Performance on the associative word-pair learning task. (A) A paired t-test revealed a significant difference in performance in the sham stimulation condition, indicating forgetting. No such difference could be observed in the active stimulation condition. (B) The difference in the number of correctly recalled words from evening to morning was shown to be significantly different between the stimulation conditions. Error bars denote SEM.

Mentions: Results are shown in Figure 2. In the sham stimulation condition participants were able to recall 74.76% (34.39 ± 6.09 words) of the items in the evening test phase, and 72.71% (33.44 ± 7.53 words) of the items in the retest session the following morning (difference: −2.05%, −0.94±1.80 words). In the active stimulation condition participants performed at 71.26% (32.78 ± 8.16 words) in the evening test phase and 72.22% (33.22 ± 8.72 words) in the morning retest phase (difference: 0.97%, 0.44 ± 2.84 words).


Bi-frontal transcranial alternating current stimulation in the ripple range reduced overnight forgetting.

Ambrus GG, Pisoni A, Primaßin A, Turi Z, Paulus W, Antal A - Front Cell Neurosci (2015)

Performance on the associative word-pair learning task. (A) A paired t-test revealed a significant difference in performance in the sham stimulation condition, indicating forgetting. No such difference could be observed in the active stimulation condition. (B) The difference in the number of correctly recalled words from evening to morning was shown to be significantly different between the stimulation conditions. Error bars denote SEM.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585169&req=5

Figure 2: Performance on the associative word-pair learning task. (A) A paired t-test revealed a significant difference in performance in the sham stimulation condition, indicating forgetting. No such difference could be observed in the active stimulation condition. (B) The difference in the number of correctly recalled words from evening to morning was shown to be significantly different between the stimulation conditions. Error bars denote SEM.
Mentions: Results are shown in Figure 2. In the sham stimulation condition participants were able to recall 74.76% (34.39 ± 6.09 words) of the items in the evening test phase, and 72.71% (33.44 ± 7.53 words) of the items in the retest session the following morning (difference: −2.05%, −0.94±1.80 words). In the active stimulation condition participants performed at 71.26% (32.78 ± 8.16 words) in the evening test phase and 72.22% (33.22 ± 8.72 words) in the morning retest phase (difference: 0.97%, 0.44 ± 2.84 words).

Bottom Line: High frequency oscillations in the hippocampal structures recorded during sleep have been proved to be essential for long-term episodic memory consolidation in both animals and in humans.An associative word-pair learning test was used.Cued recall performance was investigated 10 min after training and the morning following the training session.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinic for Clinical Neurophysiology, University Medical Center, Georg-August-University of Göttingen Göttingen, Germany ; University Medical Center, Institute of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, Georg-August-University of Göttingen Göttingen, Germany ; Institute of Psychology, Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena Jena, Germany.

ABSTRACT
High frequency oscillations in the hippocampal structures recorded during sleep have been proved to be essential for long-term episodic memory consolidation in both animals and in humans. The aim of this study was to test if transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS) of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in the hippocampal ripple range, applied bi-frontally during encoding, could modulate declarative memory performance, measured immediately after encoding, and after a night's sleep. An associative word-pair learning test was used. During an evening encoding phase, participants received 1 mA 140 Hz tACS or sham stimulation over both DLPFCs for 10 min while being presented twice with a list of word-pairs. Cued recall performance was investigated 10 min after training and the morning following the training session. Forgetting from evening to morning was observed in the sham condition, but not in the 140 Hz stimulation condition. 140 Hz tACS during encoding may have an effect on the consolidation of declarative material.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus