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The simultaneous perception of auditory-tactile stimuli in voluntary movement.

Hao Q, Ogata T, Ogawa K, Kwon J, Miyake Y - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: To eliminate the potential effect of stimulus predictability and the effect of spatial information associated with large-scale movement in the previous studies, we randomized the interval between the start of movement and the first stimulus, and used small-scale movement.These results indicate that voluntary movement itself affects the PSS in auditory-tactile simultaneous perception, but it does not influence the JND.In the discussion of these results, we suggest that simultaneous perception may be affected by the efference copy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Computational Intelligence and Systems Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology Yokohama, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The simultaneous perception of multimodal information in the environment during voluntary movement is very important for effective reactions to the environment. Previous studies have found that voluntary movement affects the simultaneous perception of auditory and tactile stimuli. However, the results of these experiments are not completely consistent, and the differences may be attributable to methodological differences in the previous studies. In this study, we investigated the effect of voluntary movement on the simultaneous perception of auditory and tactile stimuli using a temporal order judgment task with voluntary movement, involuntary movement, and no movement. To eliminate the potential effect of stimulus predictability and the effect of spatial information associated with large-scale movement in the previous studies, we randomized the interval between the start of movement and the first stimulus, and used small-scale movement. As a result, the point of subjective simultaneity (PSS) during voluntary movement shifted from the tactile stimulus being first during involuntary movement or no movement to the auditory stimulus being first. The just noticeable difference (JND), an indicator of temporal resolution, did not differ across the three conditions. These results indicate that voluntary movement itself affects the PSS in auditory-tactile simultaneous perception, but it does not influence the JND. In the discussion of these results, we suggest that simultaneous perception may be affected by the efference copy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic flow chart for one trial in each of the three conditions. (A) Voluntary movement condition, in which participants voluntarily started to move their right index fingers; (B) involuntary movement condition, in which the haptic device moved the participants’ right index fingers; (C) no movement condition. The interval between the cue and the TOJ task was randomly set from 600 to 700 ms. The interval between trials was 1000 ms.
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Figure 2: Schematic flow chart for one trial in each of the three conditions. (A) Voluntary movement condition, in which participants voluntarily started to move their right index fingers; (B) involuntary movement condition, in which the haptic device moved the participants’ right index fingers; (C) no movement condition. The interval between the cue and the TOJ task was randomly set from 600 to 700 ms. The interval between trials was 1000 ms.

Mentions: For each trial (Figure 2A), the participants voluntarily and naturally began to move their right index fingers from right to left at their own pace. As they did, a cue sound (distinct from the target auditory stimulus) indicated that the TOJ task was forthcoming. The first stimulus (either tactile or auditory) was then presented with a random delay of 600–700 ms after the cue sound onset. The second stimulus (auditory or tactile, whichever was not presented first) followed the first stimulus, offset by one of the nine SOAs previously mentioned. The participants then indicated which stimulus occurred first using a two-alternative forced-choice test (as described above). If the participants did not move at a speed of 50–110 mm/s, they were given one more trial, randomly chosen from the remaining trials.


The simultaneous perception of auditory-tactile stimuli in voluntary movement.

Hao Q, Ogata T, Ogawa K, Kwon J, Miyake Y - Front Psychol (2015)

Schematic flow chart for one trial in each of the three conditions. (A) Voluntary movement condition, in which participants voluntarily started to move their right index fingers; (B) involuntary movement condition, in which the haptic device moved the participants’ right index fingers; (C) no movement condition. The interval between the cue and the TOJ task was randomly set from 600 to 700 ms. The interval between trials was 1000 ms.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585164&req=5

Figure 2: Schematic flow chart for one trial in each of the three conditions. (A) Voluntary movement condition, in which participants voluntarily started to move their right index fingers; (B) involuntary movement condition, in which the haptic device moved the participants’ right index fingers; (C) no movement condition. The interval between the cue and the TOJ task was randomly set from 600 to 700 ms. The interval between trials was 1000 ms.
Mentions: For each trial (Figure 2A), the participants voluntarily and naturally began to move their right index fingers from right to left at their own pace. As they did, a cue sound (distinct from the target auditory stimulus) indicated that the TOJ task was forthcoming. The first stimulus (either tactile or auditory) was then presented with a random delay of 600–700 ms after the cue sound onset. The second stimulus (auditory or tactile, whichever was not presented first) followed the first stimulus, offset by one of the nine SOAs previously mentioned. The participants then indicated which stimulus occurred first using a two-alternative forced-choice test (as described above). If the participants did not move at a speed of 50–110 mm/s, they were given one more trial, randomly chosen from the remaining trials.

Bottom Line: To eliminate the potential effect of stimulus predictability and the effect of spatial information associated with large-scale movement in the previous studies, we randomized the interval between the start of movement and the first stimulus, and used small-scale movement.These results indicate that voluntary movement itself affects the PSS in auditory-tactile simultaneous perception, but it does not influence the JND.In the discussion of these results, we suggest that simultaneous perception may be affected by the efference copy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Computational Intelligence and Systems Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology Yokohama, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The simultaneous perception of multimodal information in the environment during voluntary movement is very important for effective reactions to the environment. Previous studies have found that voluntary movement affects the simultaneous perception of auditory and tactile stimuli. However, the results of these experiments are not completely consistent, and the differences may be attributable to methodological differences in the previous studies. In this study, we investigated the effect of voluntary movement on the simultaneous perception of auditory and tactile stimuli using a temporal order judgment task with voluntary movement, involuntary movement, and no movement. To eliminate the potential effect of stimulus predictability and the effect of spatial information associated with large-scale movement in the previous studies, we randomized the interval between the start of movement and the first stimulus, and used small-scale movement. As a result, the point of subjective simultaneity (PSS) during voluntary movement shifted from the tactile stimulus being first during involuntary movement or no movement to the auditory stimulus being first. The just noticeable difference (JND), an indicator of temporal resolution, did not differ across the three conditions. These results indicate that voluntary movement itself affects the PSS in auditory-tactile simultaneous perception, but it does not influence the JND. In the discussion of these results, we suggest that simultaneous perception may be affected by the efference copy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus