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The simultaneous perception of auditory-tactile stimuli in voluntary movement.

Hao Q, Ogata T, Ogawa K, Kwon J, Miyake Y - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: To eliminate the potential effect of stimulus predictability and the effect of spatial information associated with large-scale movement in the previous studies, we randomized the interval between the start of movement and the first stimulus, and used small-scale movement.These results indicate that voluntary movement itself affects the PSS in auditory-tactile simultaneous perception, but it does not influence the JND.In the discussion of these results, we suggest that simultaneous perception may be affected by the efference copy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Computational Intelligence and Systems Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology Yokohama, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The simultaneous perception of multimodal information in the environment during voluntary movement is very important for effective reactions to the environment. Previous studies have found that voluntary movement affects the simultaneous perception of auditory and tactile stimuli. However, the results of these experiments are not completely consistent, and the differences may be attributable to methodological differences in the previous studies. In this study, we investigated the effect of voluntary movement on the simultaneous perception of auditory and tactile stimuli using a temporal order judgment task with voluntary movement, involuntary movement, and no movement. To eliminate the potential effect of stimulus predictability and the effect of spatial information associated with large-scale movement in the previous studies, we randomized the interval between the start of movement and the first stimulus, and used small-scale movement. As a result, the point of subjective simultaneity (PSS) during voluntary movement shifted from the tactile stimulus being first during involuntary movement or no movement to the auditory stimulus being first. The just noticeable difference (JND), an indicator of temporal resolution, did not differ across the three conditions. These results indicate that voluntary movement itself affects the PSS in auditory-tactile simultaneous perception, but it does not influence the JND. In the discussion of these results, we suggest that simultaneous perception may be affected by the efference copy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

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Figure 1: Experimental environment.

Mentions: There were three conditions in this experiment: voluntary, involuntary, and no movement. The involuntary movement trajectory was reproduced from voluntary movement data collected in the preliminary experiments. The mean rate of movement of the participants’ fingers was 81.08 mm/s (SD = 7.33) in the voluntary movement condition and ∼78.23 mm/s (SD = 1.44) in the involuntary movement condition (as guided by the haptic device). The participants were seated in a darkened, sound-attenuated room in front of the stimulation systems, with the palmar side of their right index fingers held on the haptic device. They also wore sound-insulating earmuffs over their earphones and an eye mask to eliminate the confounding effect of visual stimuli during the experiment (Figure 1). In each condition, the participants were asked to indicate the temporal order of the auditory and tactile stimuli by using the Z and X keys on a keyboard. The Z indicated that the auditory stimulus occurred first and the X indicated that the tactile stimulus occurred first.


The simultaneous perception of auditory-tactile stimuli in voluntary movement.

Hao Q, Ogata T, Ogawa K, Kwon J, Miyake Y - Front Psychol (2015)

Experimental environment.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585164&req=5

Figure 1: Experimental environment.
Mentions: There were three conditions in this experiment: voluntary, involuntary, and no movement. The involuntary movement trajectory was reproduced from voluntary movement data collected in the preliminary experiments. The mean rate of movement of the participants’ fingers was 81.08 mm/s (SD = 7.33) in the voluntary movement condition and ∼78.23 mm/s (SD = 1.44) in the involuntary movement condition (as guided by the haptic device). The participants were seated in a darkened, sound-attenuated room in front of the stimulation systems, with the palmar side of their right index fingers held on the haptic device. They also wore sound-insulating earmuffs over their earphones and an eye mask to eliminate the confounding effect of visual stimuli during the experiment (Figure 1). In each condition, the participants were asked to indicate the temporal order of the auditory and tactile stimuli by using the Z and X keys on a keyboard. The Z indicated that the auditory stimulus occurred first and the X indicated that the tactile stimulus occurred first.

Bottom Line: To eliminate the potential effect of stimulus predictability and the effect of spatial information associated with large-scale movement in the previous studies, we randomized the interval between the start of movement and the first stimulus, and used small-scale movement.These results indicate that voluntary movement itself affects the PSS in auditory-tactile simultaneous perception, but it does not influence the JND.In the discussion of these results, we suggest that simultaneous perception may be affected by the efference copy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Computational Intelligence and Systems Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology Yokohama, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The simultaneous perception of multimodal information in the environment during voluntary movement is very important for effective reactions to the environment. Previous studies have found that voluntary movement affects the simultaneous perception of auditory and tactile stimuli. However, the results of these experiments are not completely consistent, and the differences may be attributable to methodological differences in the previous studies. In this study, we investigated the effect of voluntary movement on the simultaneous perception of auditory and tactile stimuli using a temporal order judgment task with voluntary movement, involuntary movement, and no movement. To eliminate the potential effect of stimulus predictability and the effect of spatial information associated with large-scale movement in the previous studies, we randomized the interval between the start of movement and the first stimulus, and used small-scale movement. As a result, the point of subjective simultaneity (PSS) during voluntary movement shifted from the tactile stimulus being first during involuntary movement or no movement to the auditory stimulus being first. The just noticeable difference (JND), an indicator of temporal resolution, did not differ across the three conditions. These results indicate that voluntary movement itself affects the PSS in auditory-tactile simultaneous perception, but it does not influence the JND. In the discussion of these results, we suggest that simultaneous perception may be affected by the efference copy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus