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Gender stereotypes across the ages: On-line processing in school-age children, young and older adults.

Siyanova-Chanturia A, Warren P, Pesciarelli F, Cacciari C - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Across all age groups, participants were significantly faster to respond, and significantly more likely to press 'yes,' when the gender of the target was congruent with the stereotypical gender use of the preceding prime.These findings suggest that information about the stereotypical gender associated with a role noun is incorporated into the mental representation of this word and is activated as soon as the word is heard.In addition, our results show differences between male and female participants of the various age groups, and between male- and female-oriented stereotypes, pointing to important gender asymmetries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Linguistics and Applied Language Studies, Victoria University of Wellington Wellington, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Most research to date on implicit gender stereotyping has been conducted with one age group - young adults. The mechanisms that underlie the on-line processing of stereotypical information in other age groups have received very little attention. This is the first study to investigate real time processing of gender stereotypes at different age levels. We investigated the activation of gender stereotypes in Italian in four groups of participants: third- and fifth-graders, young and older adults. Participants heard a noun that was stereotypically associated with masculine (preside "headmaster") or feminine roles (badante "social care worker"), followed by a male (padre "father") or female kinship term (madre "mother"). The task was to decide if the two words - the role noun and the kinship term - could describe the same person. Across all age groups, participants were significantly faster to respond, and significantly more likely to press 'yes,' when the gender of the target was congruent with the stereotypical gender use of the preceding prime. These findings suggest that information about the stereotypical gender associated with a role noun is incorporated into the mental representation of this word and is activated as soon as the word is heard. In addition, our results show differences between male and female participants of the various age groups, and between male- and female-oriented stereotypes, pointing to important gender asymmetries.

No MeSH data available.


Response times for ‘yes’ responses by Age Group and Congruence (mean and standard error).
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Figure 3: Response times for ‘yes’ responses by Age Group and Congruence (mean and standard error).

Mentions: Figure 2 illustrates the three-way interaction between Age Group, Participant Sex, and Target Gender – the different age groups clearly show different effects of the interaction of Participant Sex and Target Gender. The overall effect of Age Group is also obvious in this figure. Figure 3 presents the interaction of Age Group and Congruence and shows how the Congruence effect differs in size but not in direction across the groups. That is, all groups more readily accept stereotype-matching pairs than incongruent pairs, with this effect stronger for the children and smallest for the young adults. To explore the two interaction effects involving Age Group, separate analyses were carried out for each group.


Gender stereotypes across the ages: On-line processing in school-age children, young and older adults.

Siyanova-Chanturia A, Warren P, Pesciarelli F, Cacciari C - Front Psychol (2015)

Response times for ‘yes’ responses by Age Group and Congruence (mean and standard error).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585124&req=5

Figure 3: Response times for ‘yes’ responses by Age Group and Congruence (mean and standard error).
Mentions: Figure 2 illustrates the three-way interaction between Age Group, Participant Sex, and Target Gender – the different age groups clearly show different effects of the interaction of Participant Sex and Target Gender. The overall effect of Age Group is also obvious in this figure. Figure 3 presents the interaction of Age Group and Congruence and shows how the Congruence effect differs in size but not in direction across the groups. That is, all groups more readily accept stereotype-matching pairs than incongruent pairs, with this effect stronger for the children and smallest for the young adults. To explore the two interaction effects involving Age Group, separate analyses were carried out for each group.

Bottom Line: Across all age groups, participants were significantly faster to respond, and significantly more likely to press 'yes,' when the gender of the target was congruent with the stereotypical gender use of the preceding prime.These findings suggest that information about the stereotypical gender associated with a role noun is incorporated into the mental representation of this word and is activated as soon as the word is heard.In addition, our results show differences between male and female participants of the various age groups, and between male- and female-oriented stereotypes, pointing to important gender asymmetries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Linguistics and Applied Language Studies, Victoria University of Wellington Wellington, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Most research to date on implicit gender stereotyping has been conducted with one age group - young adults. The mechanisms that underlie the on-line processing of stereotypical information in other age groups have received very little attention. This is the first study to investigate real time processing of gender stereotypes at different age levels. We investigated the activation of gender stereotypes in Italian in four groups of participants: third- and fifth-graders, young and older adults. Participants heard a noun that was stereotypically associated with masculine (preside "headmaster") or feminine roles (badante "social care worker"), followed by a male (padre "father") or female kinship term (madre "mother"). The task was to decide if the two words - the role noun and the kinship term - could describe the same person. Across all age groups, participants were significantly faster to respond, and significantly more likely to press 'yes,' when the gender of the target was congruent with the stereotypical gender use of the preceding prime. These findings suggest that information about the stereotypical gender associated with a role noun is incorporated into the mental representation of this word and is activated as soon as the word is heard. In addition, our results show differences between male and female participants of the various age groups, and between male- and female-oriented stereotypes, pointing to important gender asymmetries.

No MeSH data available.