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Salmonella Typhimurium exploits inflammation to its own advantage in piglets.

Chirullo B, Pesciaroli M, Drumo R, Ruggeri J, Razzuoli E, Pistoia C, Petrucci P, Martinelli N, Cucco L, Moscati L, Amadori M, Magistrali CF, Alborali GL, Pasquali P - Front Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: This study showed that STM14028 is able to efficiently colonize in vitro porcine mono-macrophages and intestinal columnar epithelial (IPEC-J2) cells, and that the colonization significantly increases with LPS pre-treatment.This increase was then reversed by inhibiting the LPS stimulation through LPS antagonist, confirming an active role of LPS stimulation in STM14028-intracellular colonization.Typhimurium exploits inflammation for its benefit in piglets.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit of Prophyilaxis and Control of Bacterial Zoonoses, Department of Food Safety and Veterinary Public Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is responsible for foodborne zoonotic infections that, in humans, induce self-limiting gastroenteritis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the wild-type strain S. Typhimurium (STM14028) is able to exploit inflammation fostering an active infection. Due to the similarity between human and porcine diseases induced by S. Typhimurium, we used piglets as a model for salmonellosis and gastrointestinal research. This study showed that STM14028 is able to efficiently colonize in vitro porcine mono-macrophages and intestinal columnar epithelial (IPEC-J2) cells, and that the colonization significantly increases with LPS pre-treatment. This increase was then reversed by inhibiting the LPS stimulation through LPS antagonist, confirming an active role of LPS stimulation in STM14028-intracellular colonization. Moreover, LPS in vivo treatment increased cytokines blood level and body temperature at 4 h post infection, which is consistent with an acute inflammatory stimulus, capable to influence the colonization of STM14028 in different organs and tissues. The present study proves for the first time that in acute enteric salmonellosis, S. Typhimurium exploits inflammation for its benefit in piglets.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

LPS treatment raises STM14028 colonization of tonsils, cecum, and spleen of piglets. Recovery of STM14028 from different organs at 48 h post infection of piglets treated with LPS and infected with STM14028 (LPS+STM group) or only infected with STM14028 (STM group). LPS-treatment increases the colonization of tonsils, cecum, and spleen but does not influence the colonization of mesenteric lymph nodes, colon, ileum, and liver of piglets after STM14028 infection. Data refer to one out of two separate experiments performed with comparable results. The differences between the groups were statistically significant (*P ≤ 0.01, Mann–Whitney unpaired t-test).
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Figure 5: LPS treatment raises STM14028 colonization of tonsils, cecum, and spleen of piglets. Recovery of STM14028 from different organs at 48 h post infection of piglets treated with LPS and infected with STM14028 (LPS+STM group) or only infected with STM14028 (STM group). LPS-treatment increases the colonization of tonsils, cecum, and spleen but does not influence the colonization of mesenteric lymph nodes, colon, ileum, and liver of piglets after STM14028 infection. Data refer to one out of two separate experiments performed with comparable results. The differences between the groups were statistically significant (*P ≤ 0.01, Mann–Whitney unpaired t-test).

Mentions: Piglets of the three groups were euthanized 48 h after the treatments, and STM14028 infection was assessed in different organs and tissues in order to evaluate the capability of colonizing either locally in the gut milieu, or systemically. As depicted in Figure 5, piglets treated with LPS and infected with STM14028 showed a significant increase in colonization of tonsils, cecum, and spleen, whereas in mesenteric lymph nodes, colon, ileum and liver no significant difference in STM14028 colonization was observed (Figure 5).


Salmonella Typhimurium exploits inflammation to its own advantage in piglets.

Chirullo B, Pesciaroli M, Drumo R, Ruggeri J, Razzuoli E, Pistoia C, Petrucci P, Martinelli N, Cucco L, Moscati L, Amadori M, Magistrali CF, Alborali GL, Pasquali P - Front Microbiol (2015)

LPS treatment raises STM14028 colonization of tonsils, cecum, and spleen of piglets. Recovery of STM14028 from different organs at 48 h post infection of piglets treated with LPS and infected with STM14028 (LPS+STM group) or only infected with STM14028 (STM group). LPS-treatment increases the colonization of tonsils, cecum, and spleen but does not influence the colonization of mesenteric lymph nodes, colon, ileum, and liver of piglets after STM14028 infection. Data refer to one out of two separate experiments performed with comparable results. The differences between the groups were statistically significant (*P ≤ 0.01, Mann–Whitney unpaired t-test).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585093&req=5

Figure 5: LPS treatment raises STM14028 colonization of tonsils, cecum, and spleen of piglets. Recovery of STM14028 from different organs at 48 h post infection of piglets treated with LPS and infected with STM14028 (LPS+STM group) or only infected with STM14028 (STM group). LPS-treatment increases the colonization of tonsils, cecum, and spleen but does not influence the colonization of mesenteric lymph nodes, colon, ileum, and liver of piglets after STM14028 infection. Data refer to one out of two separate experiments performed with comparable results. The differences between the groups were statistically significant (*P ≤ 0.01, Mann–Whitney unpaired t-test).
Mentions: Piglets of the three groups were euthanized 48 h after the treatments, and STM14028 infection was assessed in different organs and tissues in order to evaluate the capability of colonizing either locally in the gut milieu, or systemically. As depicted in Figure 5, piglets treated with LPS and infected with STM14028 showed a significant increase in colonization of tonsils, cecum, and spleen, whereas in mesenteric lymph nodes, colon, ileum and liver no significant difference in STM14028 colonization was observed (Figure 5).

Bottom Line: This study showed that STM14028 is able to efficiently colonize in vitro porcine mono-macrophages and intestinal columnar epithelial (IPEC-J2) cells, and that the colonization significantly increases with LPS pre-treatment.This increase was then reversed by inhibiting the LPS stimulation through LPS antagonist, confirming an active role of LPS stimulation in STM14028-intracellular colonization.Typhimurium exploits inflammation for its benefit in piglets.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit of Prophyilaxis and Control of Bacterial Zoonoses, Department of Food Safety and Veterinary Public Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is responsible for foodborne zoonotic infections that, in humans, induce self-limiting gastroenteritis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the wild-type strain S. Typhimurium (STM14028) is able to exploit inflammation fostering an active infection. Due to the similarity between human and porcine diseases induced by S. Typhimurium, we used piglets as a model for salmonellosis and gastrointestinal research. This study showed that STM14028 is able to efficiently colonize in vitro porcine mono-macrophages and intestinal columnar epithelial (IPEC-J2) cells, and that the colonization significantly increases with LPS pre-treatment. This increase was then reversed by inhibiting the LPS stimulation through LPS antagonist, confirming an active role of LPS stimulation in STM14028-intracellular colonization. Moreover, LPS in vivo treatment increased cytokines blood level and body temperature at 4 h post infection, which is consistent with an acute inflammatory stimulus, capable to influence the colonization of STM14028 in different organs and tissues. The present study proves for the first time that in acute enteric salmonellosis, S. Typhimurium exploits inflammation for its benefit in piglets.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus