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The effects of bacterial volatile emissions on plant abiotic stress tolerance.

Liu XM, Zhang H - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are beneficial plant symbionts that have been successfully used in agriculture to increase seedling emergence, plant weight, crop yield, and disease resistance.Some PGPR strains release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can directly and/or indirectly mediate increases in plant biomass, disease resistance, and abiotic stress tolerance.The potential complexities in evaluating the effects of PGPR VOCs are also discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shanghai Center for Plant Stress Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are beneficial plant symbionts that have been successfully used in agriculture to increase seedling emergence, plant weight, crop yield, and disease resistance. Some PGPR strains release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can directly and/or indirectly mediate increases in plant biomass, disease resistance, and abiotic stress tolerance. This mini-review focuses on the enhancement of plant abiotic stress tolerance by bacterial VOCs. The review considers how PGPR VOCs induce tolerance to salinity and drought stress and also how they improve sulfur and iron nutrition in plants. The potential complexities in evaluating the effects of PGPR VOCs are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The effects of microbial volatiles on plant abiotic stress tolerance. VOCs can modulate Arabidopsis sodium homeostasis via tissue-specific regulation of HKT1 and possibly also via the SOS pathway. Accumulation of H2O2 and nitric oxide is involved in the VOC-induced drought tolerance in plants. Accumulation of choline synthesized by VOC-induced PEAMT and other osmo-protectants may be a common mechanism for increasing osmotic protection in salt- or drought-stressed plants. VOCs also trigger the expression of FIT1, FRO2, and IRT1 to facilitate iron uptake and plant growth. Under conditions of sulfur starvation, plants directly take up and assimilate the S-containing compounds (e.g., dimethyl disulfide) emitted from some PGPR. See text for details.
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Figure 1: The effects of microbial volatiles on plant abiotic stress tolerance. VOCs can modulate Arabidopsis sodium homeostasis via tissue-specific regulation of HKT1 and possibly also via the SOS pathway. Accumulation of H2O2 and nitric oxide is involved in the VOC-induced drought tolerance in plants. Accumulation of choline synthesized by VOC-induced PEAMT and other osmo-protectants may be a common mechanism for increasing osmotic protection in salt- or drought-stressed plants. VOCs also trigger the expression of FIT1, FRO2, and IRT1 to facilitate iron uptake and plant growth. Under conditions of sulfur starvation, plants directly take up and assimilate the S-containing compounds (e.g., dimethyl disulfide) emitted from some PGPR. See text for details.

Mentions: Although PGPR VOCs do not contain any known plant growth hormones or siderophores (Farag et al., 2013; Kanchiswamy et al., 2015), VOC-mediated regulation of plant endogenous auxin homeostasis and of iron uptake by roots has been documented (Zhang et al., 2007, 2009; Farag et al., 2013). In addition to promoting plant growth, microbial VOCs may also induce disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance, although the latter phenomenon has been studied only a few times. As a result of the increasing interests in VOCs in mediating plant-microorganism interactions, recent reviews have summarized the chemical nature of microbial VOCs, as well as the effects of microbial VOCs on plant biomass production and disease resistance (Wenke et al., 2010; Bailly and Weisskopf, 2012; Bitas et al., 2013; Farag et al., 2013; Garbeva et al., 2014; Audrain et al., 2015; Kanchiswamy et al., 2015). This mini-review focuses on the enhancement of plant abiotic stress tolerance by bacterial VOCs. In addition to providing an overview of PGPR VOC-induced tolerance to salinity and drought stress, we consider how PGPR VOCs improve sulfur and iron nutrition in plants (Figure 1). Finally, we discuss the potential complexities in evaluating the effects of PGPR VOCs.


The effects of bacterial volatile emissions on plant abiotic stress tolerance.

Liu XM, Zhang H - Front Plant Sci (2015)

The effects of microbial volatiles on plant abiotic stress tolerance. VOCs can modulate Arabidopsis sodium homeostasis via tissue-specific regulation of HKT1 and possibly also via the SOS pathway. Accumulation of H2O2 and nitric oxide is involved in the VOC-induced drought tolerance in plants. Accumulation of choline synthesized by VOC-induced PEAMT and other osmo-protectants may be a common mechanism for increasing osmotic protection in salt- or drought-stressed plants. VOCs also trigger the expression of FIT1, FRO2, and IRT1 to facilitate iron uptake and plant growth. Under conditions of sulfur starvation, plants directly take up and assimilate the S-containing compounds (e.g., dimethyl disulfide) emitted from some PGPR. See text for details.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585079&req=5

Figure 1: The effects of microbial volatiles on plant abiotic stress tolerance. VOCs can modulate Arabidopsis sodium homeostasis via tissue-specific regulation of HKT1 and possibly also via the SOS pathway. Accumulation of H2O2 and nitric oxide is involved in the VOC-induced drought tolerance in plants. Accumulation of choline synthesized by VOC-induced PEAMT and other osmo-protectants may be a common mechanism for increasing osmotic protection in salt- or drought-stressed plants. VOCs also trigger the expression of FIT1, FRO2, and IRT1 to facilitate iron uptake and plant growth. Under conditions of sulfur starvation, plants directly take up and assimilate the S-containing compounds (e.g., dimethyl disulfide) emitted from some PGPR. See text for details.
Mentions: Although PGPR VOCs do not contain any known plant growth hormones or siderophores (Farag et al., 2013; Kanchiswamy et al., 2015), VOC-mediated regulation of plant endogenous auxin homeostasis and of iron uptake by roots has been documented (Zhang et al., 2007, 2009; Farag et al., 2013). In addition to promoting plant growth, microbial VOCs may also induce disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance, although the latter phenomenon has been studied only a few times. As a result of the increasing interests in VOCs in mediating plant-microorganism interactions, recent reviews have summarized the chemical nature of microbial VOCs, as well as the effects of microbial VOCs on plant biomass production and disease resistance (Wenke et al., 2010; Bailly and Weisskopf, 2012; Bitas et al., 2013; Farag et al., 2013; Garbeva et al., 2014; Audrain et al., 2015; Kanchiswamy et al., 2015). This mini-review focuses on the enhancement of plant abiotic stress tolerance by bacterial VOCs. In addition to providing an overview of PGPR VOC-induced tolerance to salinity and drought stress, we consider how PGPR VOCs improve sulfur and iron nutrition in plants (Figure 1). Finally, we discuss the potential complexities in evaluating the effects of PGPR VOCs.

Bottom Line: Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are beneficial plant symbionts that have been successfully used in agriculture to increase seedling emergence, plant weight, crop yield, and disease resistance.Some PGPR strains release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can directly and/or indirectly mediate increases in plant biomass, disease resistance, and abiotic stress tolerance.The potential complexities in evaluating the effects of PGPR VOCs are also discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shanghai Center for Plant Stress Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are beneficial plant symbionts that have been successfully used in agriculture to increase seedling emergence, plant weight, crop yield, and disease resistance. Some PGPR strains release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can directly and/or indirectly mediate increases in plant biomass, disease resistance, and abiotic stress tolerance. This mini-review focuses on the enhancement of plant abiotic stress tolerance by bacterial VOCs. The review considers how PGPR VOCs induce tolerance to salinity and drought stress and also how they improve sulfur and iron nutrition in plants. The potential complexities in evaluating the effects of PGPR VOCs are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus