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Enhanced functional connectivity involving the ventromedial hypothalamus following methamphetamine exposure.

Zuloaga DG, Iancu OD, Weber S, Etzel D, Marzulla T, Stewart B, Allen CN, Raber J - Front Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: MA phase shifts, entrains the circadian clock and can also alter the entraining effect of light by currently unknown mechanisms.There were five distinct patterns of neuronal activation.Functional connectivity between the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and other brain areas, including the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and basolateral and medial amygdala, was enhanced following MA exposure, suggesting a role for the VMH in the effects of MA on the brain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University Portland Portland, OR, USA ; Department of Psychology, University at Albany Albany, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Methamphetamine (MA) consumption causes disruption of many biological rhythms including the sleep-wake cycle. This circadian effect is seen shortly following MA exposure and later in life following developmental MA exposure. MA phase shifts, entrains the circadian clock and can also alter the entraining effect of light by currently unknown mechanisms. We analyzed and compared immunoreactivity of the immediate early gene c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activity, to assess neuronal activation 2 h following MA exposure in the light and dark phases. We used network analyses of correlation patterns derived from global brain immunoreactivity patterns of c-Fos, to infer functional connectivity between brain regions. There were five distinct patterns of neuronal activation. In several brain areas, neuronal activation following exposure to MA was stronger in the light than the dark phase, highlighting the importance of considering circadian periods of increased effects of MA in defining experimental conditions and understanding the mechanisms underlying detrimental effects of MA exposure to brain function. Functional connectivity between the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and other brain areas, including the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and basolateral and medial amygdala, was enhanced following MA exposure, suggesting a role for the VMH in the effects of MA on the brain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Brain areas that showed no treatment or time effects or a treatment × time interaction. There were no significant effects of MA, time, or an interaction between MA and time in the MEA (A), BLA (B), and DG (C). There was a trend toward an interaction in the MEA (p = 0.08) but that did not reach significance. Representative images for neuronal activation in the DG following saline or MA exposure in the day and night are shown in (D). n = 10 mice/treatment/time period.
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Figure 5: Brain areas that showed no treatment or time effects or a treatment × time interaction. There were no significant effects of MA, time, or an interaction between MA and time in the MEA (A), BLA (B), and DG (C). There was a trend toward an interaction in the MEA (p = 0.08) but that did not reach significance. Representative images for neuronal activation in the DG following saline or MA exposure in the day and night are shown in (D). n = 10 mice/treatment/time period.

Mentions: Three brain regions showed neither overall effects of MA or time or a MA × time interaction (Figure 5): the MEA (Figure 5A), BLA (Figure 5B), and DG (Figure 5C). There was a trend toward an interaction between MA and time in the MEA (p = 0.08) with an increase in the number of c-Fos positive cells following MA exposure in the day but decrease in the number of c-Fos positive cells following MA exposure in the night but that did not reach significance. Representative images for neuronal activation in the DG following saline or MA exposure in the light and dark phases are shown in Figure 5D.


Enhanced functional connectivity involving the ventromedial hypothalamus following methamphetamine exposure.

Zuloaga DG, Iancu OD, Weber S, Etzel D, Marzulla T, Stewart B, Allen CN, Raber J - Front Neurosci (2015)

Brain areas that showed no treatment or time effects or a treatment × time interaction. There were no significant effects of MA, time, or an interaction between MA and time in the MEA (A), BLA (B), and DG (C). There was a trend toward an interaction in the MEA (p = 0.08) but that did not reach significance. Representative images for neuronal activation in the DG following saline or MA exposure in the day and night are shown in (D). n = 10 mice/treatment/time period.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585047&req=5

Figure 5: Brain areas that showed no treatment or time effects or a treatment × time interaction. There were no significant effects of MA, time, or an interaction between MA and time in the MEA (A), BLA (B), and DG (C). There was a trend toward an interaction in the MEA (p = 0.08) but that did not reach significance. Representative images for neuronal activation in the DG following saline or MA exposure in the day and night are shown in (D). n = 10 mice/treatment/time period.
Mentions: Three brain regions showed neither overall effects of MA or time or a MA × time interaction (Figure 5): the MEA (Figure 5A), BLA (Figure 5B), and DG (Figure 5C). There was a trend toward an interaction between MA and time in the MEA (p = 0.08) with an increase in the number of c-Fos positive cells following MA exposure in the day but decrease in the number of c-Fos positive cells following MA exposure in the night but that did not reach significance. Representative images for neuronal activation in the DG following saline or MA exposure in the light and dark phases are shown in Figure 5D.

Bottom Line: MA phase shifts, entrains the circadian clock and can also alter the entraining effect of light by currently unknown mechanisms.There were five distinct patterns of neuronal activation.Functional connectivity between the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and other brain areas, including the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and basolateral and medial amygdala, was enhanced following MA exposure, suggesting a role for the VMH in the effects of MA on the brain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University Portland Portland, OR, USA ; Department of Psychology, University at Albany Albany, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Methamphetamine (MA) consumption causes disruption of many biological rhythms including the sleep-wake cycle. This circadian effect is seen shortly following MA exposure and later in life following developmental MA exposure. MA phase shifts, entrains the circadian clock and can also alter the entraining effect of light by currently unknown mechanisms. We analyzed and compared immunoreactivity of the immediate early gene c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activity, to assess neuronal activation 2 h following MA exposure in the light and dark phases. We used network analyses of correlation patterns derived from global brain immunoreactivity patterns of c-Fos, to infer functional connectivity between brain regions. There were five distinct patterns of neuronal activation. In several brain areas, neuronal activation following exposure to MA was stronger in the light than the dark phase, highlighting the importance of considering circadian periods of increased effects of MA in defining experimental conditions and understanding the mechanisms underlying detrimental effects of MA exposure to brain function. Functional connectivity between the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and other brain areas, including the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and basolateral and medial amygdala, was enhanced following MA exposure, suggesting a role for the VMH in the effects of MA on the brain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus