Limits...
Macroautophagy in Endogenous Processing of Self- and Pathogen-Derived Antigens for MHC Class II Presentation.

Duraes FV, Niven J, Dubrot J, Hugues S, Gannagé M - Front Immunol (2015)

Bottom Line: Through autophagosomes, endogenous self-antigens as well as antigens derived from intracellular pathogens can be delivered to MHC class II compartment and presented to CD4(+) T cells.The pathway will, therefore, impact both peripheral T cell tolerance and the pathogen specific immune response.This review will describe the contribution of autophagy to intracellular presentation of endogenous self- or pathogen-derived antigens via MHC class II and its consequences on CD4(+) T cell responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Geneva , Geneva , Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Although autophagy is a process that has been studied for several years its link with antigen presentation and T cell immunity has only recently emerged. Autophagy, which means "self-eating," is important to maintain cell homeostasis and refers to a collection of mechanisms that delivers intracellular material for degradation into lysosomes. Among them, macroautophagy pathway has many implications in different biological processes, including innate and adaptive immunity. In particular, macroautophagy can provide a substantial source of intracellular antigens for loading onto MHC class II molecules using the alternative MHC class II pathway. Through autophagosomes, endogenous self-antigens as well as antigens derived from intracellular pathogens can be delivered to MHC class II compartment and presented to CD4(+) T cells. The pathway will, therefore, impact both peripheral T cell tolerance and the pathogen specific immune response. This review will describe the contribution of autophagy to intracellular presentation of endogenous self- or pathogen-derived antigens via MHC class II and its consequences on CD4(+) T cell responses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pathways of autophagy. Autophagy can deliver cytosolic components to lysosomes for degradation via three different pathways. In chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), proteins having a KFERQ-like motif are translocated into the lysosome via the LAMP-2A transporter, with the help of Hsp70 chaperones. Microautophagy involves the sequestration of substrates via the invagination of the lysosomal membrane, while in macroautophagy, the substrates are engulfed in a double membrane vesicle, called autophagosome, which subsequently fuses with the lysosome to deliver its content for degradation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585038&req=5

Figure 1: Pathways of autophagy. Autophagy can deliver cytosolic components to lysosomes for degradation via three different pathways. In chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), proteins having a KFERQ-like motif are translocated into the lysosome via the LAMP-2A transporter, with the help of Hsp70 chaperones. Microautophagy involves the sequestration of substrates via the invagination of the lysosomal membrane, while in macroautophagy, the substrates are engulfed in a double membrane vesicle, called autophagosome, which subsequently fuses with the lysosome to deliver its content for degradation.

Mentions: Substrates of CMA carry a KFERQ-like signal peptide and are recognized by the chaperone HSC70 (heat shock cognate 70), forming a substrate/chaperone complex. This complex is imported into the lysosome via LAMP2a (lysosome-associated membrane protein 2a) transporter, assisted by another HSC70 member in the lysosomal lumen. This is a unique selective pathway for the delivery of proteins into lysosomes (11, 12) (Figure 1).


Macroautophagy in Endogenous Processing of Self- and Pathogen-Derived Antigens for MHC Class II Presentation.

Duraes FV, Niven J, Dubrot J, Hugues S, Gannagé M - Front Immunol (2015)

Pathways of autophagy. Autophagy can deliver cytosolic components to lysosomes for degradation via three different pathways. In chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), proteins having a KFERQ-like motif are translocated into the lysosome via the LAMP-2A transporter, with the help of Hsp70 chaperones. Microautophagy involves the sequestration of substrates via the invagination of the lysosomal membrane, while in macroautophagy, the substrates are engulfed in a double membrane vesicle, called autophagosome, which subsequently fuses with the lysosome to deliver its content for degradation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585038&req=5

Figure 1: Pathways of autophagy. Autophagy can deliver cytosolic components to lysosomes for degradation via three different pathways. In chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), proteins having a KFERQ-like motif are translocated into the lysosome via the LAMP-2A transporter, with the help of Hsp70 chaperones. Microautophagy involves the sequestration of substrates via the invagination of the lysosomal membrane, while in macroautophagy, the substrates are engulfed in a double membrane vesicle, called autophagosome, which subsequently fuses with the lysosome to deliver its content for degradation.
Mentions: Substrates of CMA carry a KFERQ-like signal peptide and are recognized by the chaperone HSC70 (heat shock cognate 70), forming a substrate/chaperone complex. This complex is imported into the lysosome via LAMP2a (lysosome-associated membrane protein 2a) transporter, assisted by another HSC70 member in the lysosomal lumen. This is a unique selective pathway for the delivery of proteins into lysosomes (11, 12) (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Through autophagosomes, endogenous self-antigens as well as antigens derived from intracellular pathogens can be delivered to MHC class II compartment and presented to CD4(+) T cells.The pathway will, therefore, impact both peripheral T cell tolerance and the pathogen specific immune response.This review will describe the contribution of autophagy to intracellular presentation of endogenous self- or pathogen-derived antigens via MHC class II and its consequences on CD4(+) T cell responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Geneva , Geneva , Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Although autophagy is a process that has been studied for several years its link with antigen presentation and T cell immunity has only recently emerged. Autophagy, which means "self-eating," is important to maintain cell homeostasis and refers to a collection of mechanisms that delivers intracellular material for degradation into lysosomes. Among them, macroautophagy pathway has many implications in different biological processes, including innate and adaptive immunity. In particular, macroautophagy can provide a substantial source of intracellular antigens for loading onto MHC class II molecules using the alternative MHC class II pathway. Through autophagosomes, endogenous self-antigens as well as antigens derived from intracellular pathogens can be delivered to MHC class II compartment and presented to CD4(+) T cells. The pathway will, therefore, impact both peripheral T cell tolerance and the pathogen specific immune response. This review will describe the contribution of autophagy to intracellular presentation of endogenous self- or pathogen-derived antigens via MHC class II and its consequences on CD4(+) T cell responses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus