Limits...
Children's spontaneous emotional expressions while receiving (un)wanted prizes in the presence of peers.

Visser M, Krahmer E, Swerts M - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Results showed that co-presence positively affected children's happiness only when receiving the first prize.Moreover, for children who were in the presence of a peer, we found that eye contact affected children's expressions of happiness, but that the effect was different for different age groups: 8-year-old children were negatively affected, and 11-year-old children positively.Overall, we can conclude that as children grow older and their social awareness increases, the presence of a peer affects their non-verbal expressions, regardless of their appreciation of their prize.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tilburg Center for Cognition and Communication, Tilburg University, Tilburg Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Although current emotion theories emphasize the importance of contextual factors for emotional expressive behavior, developmental studies that examine such factors are currently thin on the ground. In this research, we studied the course of emotional expressions of 8- and 11-year-old children after winning a (large) first prize or a (substantially smaller) consolation prize, while playing a game competing against the computer or a physically co-present peer. We analyzed their emotional reactions by conducting two perception tests in which participants rated children's level of happiness. Results showed that co-presence positively affected children's happiness only when receiving the first prize. Moreover, for children who were in the presence of a peer, we found that eye contact affected children's expressions of happiness, but that the effect was different for different age groups: 8-year-old children were negatively affected, and 11-year-old children positively. Overall, we can conclude that as children grow older and their social awareness increases, the presence of a peer affects their non-verbal expressions, regardless of their appreciation of their prize.

No MeSH data available.


Stills illustrating representative examples of children’s typical reactions in different experimental conditions (top left: computer/first prize; top right: present peer/first prize; bottom left: computer/consolation prize; bottom right: present peer/consolation prize).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585014&req=5

Figure 3: Stills illustrating representative examples of children’s typical reactions in different experimental conditions (top left: computer/first prize; top right: present peer/first prize; bottom left: computer/consolation prize; bottom right: present peer/consolation prize).

Mentions: These results showed that the manipulation worked as intended. Children in all conditions were keener on being awarded the first prize than the consolation prize. Moreover, regardless of their age or of whether they played the game competing the computer or a physically present peer, children reported to be happier with the first price than with the consolation prize. Figure 3 displays stills from representative reactions of children in all experimental conditions. In the next sections, we analyzed their expressive behavior by letting third-party judges rate children’s level of happiness in two perception experiments.


Children's spontaneous emotional expressions while receiving (un)wanted prizes in the presence of peers.

Visser M, Krahmer E, Swerts M - Front Psychol (2015)

Stills illustrating representative examples of children’s typical reactions in different experimental conditions (top left: computer/first prize; top right: present peer/first prize; bottom left: computer/consolation prize; bottom right: present peer/consolation prize).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4585014&req=5

Figure 3: Stills illustrating representative examples of children’s typical reactions in different experimental conditions (top left: computer/first prize; top right: present peer/first prize; bottom left: computer/consolation prize; bottom right: present peer/consolation prize).
Mentions: These results showed that the manipulation worked as intended. Children in all conditions were keener on being awarded the first prize than the consolation prize. Moreover, regardless of their age or of whether they played the game competing the computer or a physically present peer, children reported to be happier with the first price than with the consolation prize. Figure 3 displays stills from representative reactions of children in all experimental conditions. In the next sections, we analyzed their expressive behavior by letting third-party judges rate children’s level of happiness in two perception experiments.

Bottom Line: Results showed that co-presence positively affected children's happiness only when receiving the first prize.Moreover, for children who were in the presence of a peer, we found that eye contact affected children's expressions of happiness, but that the effect was different for different age groups: 8-year-old children were negatively affected, and 11-year-old children positively.Overall, we can conclude that as children grow older and their social awareness increases, the presence of a peer affects their non-verbal expressions, regardless of their appreciation of their prize.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tilburg Center for Cognition and Communication, Tilburg University, Tilburg Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Although current emotion theories emphasize the importance of contextual factors for emotional expressive behavior, developmental studies that examine such factors are currently thin on the ground. In this research, we studied the course of emotional expressions of 8- and 11-year-old children after winning a (large) first prize or a (substantially smaller) consolation prize, while playing a game competing against the computer or a physically co-present peer. We analyzed their emotional reactions by conducting two perception tests in which participants rated children's level of happiness. Results showed that co-presence positively affected children's happiness only when receiving the first prize. Moreover, for children who were in the presence of a peer, we found that eye contact affected children's expressions of happiness, but that the effect was different for different age groups: 8-year-old children were negatively affected, and 11-year-old children positively. Overall, we can conclude that as children grow older and their social awareness increases, the presence of a peer affects their non-verbal expressions, regardless of their appreciation of their prize.

No MeSH data available.