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Biogas Cook Stoves for Healthy and Sustainable Diets? A Case Study in Southern India.

Anderman TL, DeFries RS, Wood SA, Remans R, Ahuja R, Ulla SE - Front Nutr (2015)

Bottom Line: Published research on these technologies focuses on their potential to reduce indoor air pollution and improve respiratory health.We compare treatment households who are supplied with a biogas cook stove with comparison households who do not have access to these stoves, while controlling for several socio-economic factors.To inform development investments and ensure these co-benefits, we argue that multiple dimensions of sustainability should be considered in evaluating the impact of alternative cook stoves.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Environmental Defense Fund , San Francisco, CA , USA.

ABSTRACT
Alternative cook stoves that replace solid fuels with cleaner energy sources, such as biogas, are gaining popularity in low-income settings across Asia, Africa, and South America. Published research on these technologies focuses on their potential to reduce indoor air pollution and improve respiratory health. Effects on other cooking-related aspects, such as diets and women's time management, are less understood. In this study, in southern India, we investigate if using biogas cook stoves alters household diets and women's time management. We compare treatment households who are supplied with a biogas cook stove with comparison households who do not have access to these stoves, while controlling for several socio-economic factors. We find that diets of treatment households are more diverse than diets of comparison households. In addition, women from treatment households spend on average 40 min less cooking and 70 min less collecting firewood per day than women in comparison households. This study illustrates that alongside known benefits for respiratory health, using alternative cook stoves may benefit household diets and free up women's time. To inform development investments and ensure these co-benefits, we argue that multiple dimensions of sustainability should be considered in evaluating the impact of alternative cook stoves.

No MeSH data available.


Map depicting (A) the study area in the state of Karnataka, India; (B) in the district of Kolar; (C) in the Bagepalli panchayat. Created in ArcGIS using external data (50–53).
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Figure 1: Map depicting (A) the study area in the state of Karnataka, India; (B) in the district of Kolar; (C) in the Bagepalli panchayat. Created in ArcGIS using external data (50–53).

Mentions: We analyzed household-level data for members of the Agricultural Development and Training Society (ADATS) in the state of Karnataka in southern India. ADATS is a membership-based organization of smallholder households that pool capital to address financial needs. Operating out of the town of Bagepalli, 100 km north of Bangalore, ADATS has about 30,000 participating families in over 1,000 villages in five panchayats (Indian self-governments at the village level) in the Kolar district of Karnataka (Figure 1) (50, 51). ADATS’ work spans multiple sectors, including adult literacy, alternative energy development, agriculture, child education, public health, legal aid, and mitigation of climate change.


Biogas Cook Stoves for Healthy and Sustainable Diets? A Case Study in Southern India.

Anderman TL, DeFries RS, Wood SA, Remans R, Ahuja R, Ulla SE - Front Nutr (2015)

Map depicting (A) the study area in the state of Karnataka, India; (B) in the district of Kolar; (C) in the Bagepalli panchayat. Created in ArcGIS using external data (50–53).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4584993&req=5

Figure 1: Map depicting (A) the study area in the state of Karnataka, India; (B) in the district of Kolar; (C) in the Bagepalli panchayat. Created in ArcGIS using external data (50–53).
Mentions: We analyzed household-level data for members of the Agricultural Development and Training Society (ADATS) in the state of Karnataka in southern India. ADATS is a membership-based organization of smallholder households that pool capital to address financial needs. Operating out of the town of Bagepalli, 100 km north of Bangalore, ADATS has about 30,000 participating families in over 1,000 villages in five panchayats (Indian self-governments at the village level) in the Kolar district of Karnataka (Figure 1) (50, 51). ADATS’ work spans multiple sectors, including adult literacy, alternative energy development, agriculture, child education, public health, legal aid, and mitigation of climate change.

Bottom Line: Published research on these technologies focuses on their potential to reduce indoor air pollution and improve respiratory health.We compare treatment households who are supplied with a biogas cook stove with comparison households who do not have access to these stoves, while controlling for several socio-economic factors.To inform development investments and ensure these co-benefits, we argue that multiple dimensions of sustainability should be considered in evaluating the impact of alternative cook stoves.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Environmental Defense Fund , San Francisco, CA , USA.

ABSTRACT
Alternative cook stoves that replace solid fuels with cleaner energy sources, such as biogas, are gaining popularity in low-income settings across Asia, Africa, and South America. Published research on these technologies focuses on their potential to reduce indoor air pollution and improve respiratory health. Effects on other cooking-related aspects, such as diets and women's time management, are less understood. In this study, in southern India, we investigate if using biogas cook stoves alters household diets and women's time management. We compare treatment households who are supplied with a biogas cook stove with comparison households who do not have access to these stoves, while controlling for several socio-economic factors. We find that diets of treatment households are more diverse than diets of comparison households. In addition, women from treatment households spend on average 40 min less cooking and 70 min less collecting firewood per day than women in comparison households. This study illustrates that alongside known benefits for respiratory health, using alternative cook stoves may benefit household diets and free up women's time. To inform development investments and ensure these co-benefits, we argue that multiple dimensions of sustainability should be considered in evaluating the impact of alternative cook stoves.

No MeSH data available.