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Regional electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha power and asymmetry in older adults: a study of short-term test-retest reliability.

Mathewson KJ, Hashemi A, Sheng B, Sekuler AB, Bennett PJ, Schmidt LA - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Pearson and intra-class correlations indicated acceptable test-retest reliability for alpha power and asymmetry measures in all regions.Interestingly, alpha asymmetry appeared to be less affected by the task than was alpha power.Findings suggest that alpha asymmetry may reflect more enduring, "trait-like" characteristics, while alpha power may reflect more "state-like" processes in older adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University Hamilton, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Although regional alpha power and asymmetry measures have been widely used as indices of individual differences in emotional processing and affective style in younger populations, there have been relatively few studies that have examined these measures in older adults. Here, we examined the short-term test-retest reliability of resting regional alpha power (7.5-12.5 Hz) and asymmetry in a sample of 38 active, community-dwelling older adults (M age = 71.2, SD = 6.5 years). Resting electroencephalogram recordings were made before and after a perceptual computer task. Pearson and intra-class correlations indicated acceptable test-retest reliability for alpha power and asymmetry measures in all regions. Interestingly, alpha asymmetry appeared to be less affected by the task than was alpha power. Findings suggest that alpha asymmetry may reflect more enduring, "trait-like" characteristics, while alpha power may reflect more "state-like" processes in older adults.

No MeSH data available.


Scatterplots of the associations between lateral-frontal asymmetry in the eyes-closed, pre-task (T1), and post-task (T2) conditions.
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Figure 2: Scatterplots of the associations between lateral-frontal asymmetry in the eyes-closed, pre-task (T1), and post-task (T2) conditions.

Mentions: Test–retest reliability between pre- and post-task regional asymmetry was very good (EC: ICCs = 0.65–0.91, ps < 0.001; EO: ICCs = 0.53–0.86, ps < 0.001). As well, pre- and post-task asymmetry values were highly correlated for both the EC and EO conditions for all regions tested (all ps < 0.001; see Table 2). Individual differences in frontal alpha asymmetry (and their rank order) seen at T1 were well-preserved at T2, after the task (see Figures 1 and 2).


Regional electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha power and asymmetry in older adults: a study of short-term test-retest reliability.

Mathewson KJ, Hashemi A, Sheng B, Sekuler AB, Bennett PJ, Schmidt LA - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

Scatterplots of the associations between lateral-frontal asymmetry in the eyes-closed, pre-task (T1), and post-task (T2) conditions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4584992&req=5

Figure 2: Scatterplots of the associations between lateral-frontal asymmetry in the eyes-closed, pre-task (T1), and post-task (T2) conditions.
Mentions: Test–retest reliability between pre- and post-task regional asymmetry was very good (EC: ICCs = 0.65–0.91, ps < 0.001; EO: ICCs = 0.53–0.86, ps < 0.001). As well, pre- and post-task asymmetry values were highly correlated for both the EC and EO conditions for all regions tested (all ps < 0.001; see Table 2). Individual differences in frontal alpha asymmetry (and their rank order) seen at T1 were well-preserved at T2, after the task (see Figures 1 and 2).

Bottom Line: Pearson and intra-class correlations indicated acceptable test-retest reliability for alpha power and asymmetry measures in all regions.Interestingly, alpha asymmetry appeared to be less affected by the task than was alpha power.Findings suggest that alpha asymmetry may reflect more enduring, "trait-like" characteristics, while alpha power may reflect more "state-like" processes in older adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University Hamilton, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Although regional alpha power and asymmetry measures have been widely used as indices of individual differences in emotional processing and affective style in younger populations, there have been relatively few studies that have examined these measures in older adults. Here, we examined the short-term test-retest reliability of resting regional alpha power (7.5-12.5 Hz) and asymmetry in a sample of 38 active, community-dwelling older adults (M age = 71.2, SD = 6.5 years). Resting electroencephalogram recordings were made before and after a perceptual computer task. Pearson and intra-class correlations indicated acceptable test-retest reliability for alpha power and asymmetry measures in all regions. Interestingly, alpha asymmetry appeared to be less affected by the task than was alpha power. Findings suggest that alpha asymmetry may reflect more enduring, "trait-like" characteristics, while alpha power may reflect more "state-like" processes in older adults.

No MeSH data available.