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Identification of resilient individuals and those at risk for performance deficits under stress.

Winslow BD, Carroll MB, Martin JW, Surpris G, Chadderdon GL - Front Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Here we measure the effects of stress on physiological response and performance through behavior, physiological sensors, and subjective ratings, and identify which individuals are at risk for stress-related performance decrements.Stress response was effectively captured via electrodermal and cardiovascular measures of heart rate and skin conductance level.Outliers were identified in the experimental group that had a significant mismatch between self-reported stress and salivary cortisol.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Design Interactive, Inc. Orlando, FL, USA.

ABSTRACT
Human task performance is affected by exposure to physiological and psychological stress. The ability to measure the physiological response to stressors and correlate that to task performance could be used to identify resilient individuals or those at risk for stress-related performance decrements. Accomplishing this prior to performance under severe stress or the development of clinical stress disorders could facilitate focused preparation such as tailoring training to individual needs. Here we measure the effects of stress on physiological response and performance through behavior, physiological sensors, and subjective ratings, and identify which individuals are at risk for stress-related performance decrements. Participants performed military-relevant training tasks under stress in a virtual environment, with autonomic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) reactivity analyzed. Self-reported stress, as well as physiological indices of stress, increased in the group pre-exposed to socioevaluative stress. Stress response was effectively captured via electrodermal and cardiovascular measures of heart rate and skin conductance level. A resilience classification algorithm was developed based upon physiological reactivity, which correlated with baseline unstressed physiological and self-reported stress values. Outliers were identified in the experimental group that had a significant mismatch between self-reported stress and salivary cortisol. Baseline stress measurements were predictive of individual resilience to stress, including the impact stress had on physiological reactivity and performance. Such an approach may have utility in identifying individuals at risk for problems performing under severe stress. Continuing work has focused on adapting this method for military personnel, and assessing the utility of various coping and decision-making strategies on performance and physiological stress.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Group differences in cardiovascular measures during the experiment. Heart rate trended higher during the TSST in both groups, and throughout in the experimental group. A group difference in heart rate was observed during scenario 2 only. Respiration rate trended higher during scenarios for both groups, and lower during the TSST. LF/HF activity was dominated by sympathetic activity. No group or scenario differences were observed. Temporal domain HRV (SDNN) showed a significant increase in the TSST as compared to all other scenarios for the experimental group. Average baseline scores shown by dotted line. *p ≤ 0.05.
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Figure 4: Group differences in cardiovascular measures during the experiment. Heart rate trended higher during the TSST in both groups, and throughout in the experimental group. A group difference in heart rate was observed during scenario 2 only. Respiration rate trended higher during scenarios for both groups, and lower during the TSST. LF/HF activity was dominated by sympathetic activity. No group or scenario differences were observed. Temporal domain HRV (SDNN) showed a significant increase in the TSST as compared to all other scenarios for the experimental group. Average baseline scores shown by dotted line. *p ≤ 0.05.

Mentions: Mean cardiovascular effects are shown in Figure 4. Between groups, heart rate trended higher in the experimental group as compared to control throughout, but only achieved statistical significance during scenario 2 (p ≤ 0.05). Within groups, repeated measures ANOVA showed a statistically significant increase in the experimental group between the TSST and scenarios 2, 3, and 4 (p ≤ 0.001) and between the TSST and baseline and scenarios 1 and 5 (p ≤ 0.05). Respiration rate was higher during the scenarios as compared to baseline, and lower during the TSST for both groups, however, repeated measures ANOVA did not detect differences across scenarios, and t-tests did not find differences between groups. The LF/HF ratio, indicative of whether sympathetic (LF) or vagal (HF) activity dominated throughout the experiment, showed a trend toward sympathetic activity throughout, but statistical analysis did not reveal differences between or within groups for both conditions. Temporal domain HRV (SDNN) showed a significant increase between the TSST and the baseline as well as scenarios 2, 3 (p ≤ 0.05) and 4 (p ≤ 0.001) within the experimental group.


Identification of resilient individuals and those at risk for performance deficits under stress.

Winslow BD, Carroll MB, Martin JW, Surpris G, Chadderdon GL - Front Neurosci (2015)

Group differences in cardiovascular measures during the experiment. Heart rate trended higher during the TSST in both groups, and throughout in the experimental group. A group difference in heart rate was observed during scenario 2 only. Respiration rate trended higher during scenarios for both groups, and lower during the TSST. LF/HF activity was dominated by sympathetic activity. No group or scenario differences were observed. Temporal domain HRV (SDNN) showed a significant increase in the TSST as compared to all other scenarios for the experimental group. Average baseline scores shown by dotted line. *p ≤ 0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4584989&req=5

Figure 4: Group differences in cardiovascular measures during the experiment. Heart rate trended higher during the TSST in both groups, and throughout in the experimental group. A group difference in heart rate was observed during scenario 2 only. Respiration rate trended higher during scenarios for both groups, and lower during the TSST. LF/HF activity was dominated by sympathetic activity. No group or scenario differences were observed. Temporal domain HRV (SDNN) showed a significant increase in the TSST as compared to all other scenarios for the experimental group. Average baseline scores shown by dotted line. *p ≤ 0.05.
Mentions: Mean cardiovascular effects are shown in Figure 4. Between groups, heart rate trended higher in the experimental group as compared to control throughout, but only achieved statistical significance during scenario 2 (p ≤ 0.05). Within groups, repeated measures ANOVA showed a statistically significant increase in the experimental group between the TSST and scenarios 2, 3, and 4 (p ≤ 0.001) and between the TSST and baseline and scenarios 1 and 5 (p ≤ 0.05). Respiration rate was higher during the scenarios as compared to baseline, and lower during the TSST for both groups, however, repeated measures ANOVA did not detect differences across scenarios, and t-tests did not find differences between groups. The LF/HF ratio, indicative of whether sympathetic (LF) or vagal (HF) activity dominated throughout the experiment, showed a trend toward sympathetic activity throughout, but statistical analysis did not reveal differences between or within groups for both conditions. Temporal domain HRV (SDNN) showed a significant increase between the TSST and the baseline as well as scenarios 2, 3 (p ≤ 0.05) and 4 (p ≤ 0.001) within the experimental group.

Bottom Line: Here we measure the effects of stress on physiological response and performance through behavior, physiological sensors, and subjective ratings, and identify which individuals are at risk for stress-related performance decrements.Stress response was effectively captured via electrodermal and cardiovascular measures of heart rate and skin conductance level.Outliers were identified in the experimental group that had a significant mismatch between self-reported stress and salivary cortisol.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Design Interactive, Inc. Orlando, FL, USA.

ABSTRACT
Human task performance is affected by exposure to physiological and psychological stress. The ability to measure the physiological response to stressors and correlate that to task performance could be used to identify resilient individuals or those at risk for stress-related performance decrements. Accomplishing this prior to performance under severe stress or the development of clinical stress disorders could facilitate focused preparation such as tailoring training to individual needs. Here we measure the effects of stress on physiological response and performance through behavior, physiological sensors, and subjective ratings, and identify which individuals are at risk for stress-related performance decrements. Participants performed military-relevant training tasks under stress in a virtual environment, with autonomic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) reactivity analyzed. Self-reported stress, as well as physiological indices of stress, increased in the group pre-exposed to socioevaluative stress. Stress response was effectively captured via electrodermal and cardiovascular measures of heart rate and skin conductance level. A resilience classification algorithm was developed based upon physiological reactivity, which correlated with baseline unstressed physiological and self-reported stress values. Outliers were identified in the experimental group that had a significant mismatch between self-reported stress and salivary cortisol. Baseline stress measurements were predictive of individual resilience to stress, including the impact stress had on physiological reactivity and performance. Such an approach may have utility in identifying individuals at risk for problems performing under severe stress. Continuing work has focused on adapting this method for military personnel, and assessing the utility of various coping and decision-making strategies on performance and physiological stress.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus