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Orchid-pollinator interactions and potential vulnerability to biological invasion.

Chupp AD, Battaglia LL, Schauber EM, Sipes SD - AoB Plants (2015)

Bottom Line: Our results are supported by historical data that suggest P. palamedes and P. sennae are important pollinators of P. ciliaris.Although P. sennae may provide supplemental pollination service, this is likely constrained by habitat preferences that do not always overlap with those of P. cilaris.Observed declines of P. palamedes due to LWD could severely limit the reproductive success and persistence of P. ciliaris and similar orchid species populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Biology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901, USA adam.chupp@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Viable and non-viable seeds that were dissected from expanded and unexpanded P. ciliaris ovaries, respectively. Viable seeds contain enlarged embryos in the centre of the seed. Viewed at ×90 magnification.
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PLV099F2: Viable and non-viable seeds that were dissected from expanded and unexpanded P. ciliaris ovaries, respectively. Viable seeds contain enlarged embryos in the centre of the seed. Viewed at ×90 magnification.

Mentions: Successful pollination and fruit set were indicated by a widening of the ovary (Fig. 1). To ensure that we were accurately recognizing ovaries with viable fruits, we dissected a small subset of ovaries (n = 8) and examined the seeds under a dissecting microscope (Model SZX12, Olympus, Center Valley, PA, USA) to verify viability (i.e. embryonic enlargement, Fig. 2). Unexpanded ovaries always contained seeds with undeveloped embryos, while expanded ovaries consistently harboured seeds with developing embryos. In cases when ovaries exhibited moderate widening, seed viability was assessed under the microscope by examining the relative size of the embryo. For each inflorescence, fruit set was quantified as the proportion of flowers that had expanded ovaries (containing at least some viable seeds).Figure 1.


Orchid-pollinator interactions and potential vulnerability to biological invasion.

Chupp AD, Battaglia LL, Schauber EM, Sipes SD - AoB Plants (2015)

Viable and non-viable seeds that were dissected from expanded and unexpanded P. ciliaris ovaries, respectively. Viable seeds contain enlarged embryos in the centre of the seed. Viewed at ×90 magnification.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4584961&req=5

PLV099F2: Viable and non-viable seeds that were dissected from expanded and unexpanded P. ciliaris ovaries, respectively. Viable seeds contain enlarged embryos in the centre of the seed. Viewed at ×90 magnification.
Mentions: Successful pollination and fruit set were indicated by a widening of the ovary (Fig. 1). To ensure that we were accurately recognizing ovaries with viable fruits, we dissected a small subset of ovaries (n = 8) and examined the seeds under a dissecting microscope (Model SZX12, Olympus, Center Valley, PA, USA) to verify viability (i.e. embryonic enlargement, Fig. 2). Unexpanded ovaries always contained seeds with undeveloped embryos, while expanded ovaries consistently harboured seeds with developing embryos. In cases when ovaries exhibited moderate widening, seed viability was assessed under the microscope by examining the relative size of the embryo. For each inflorescence, fruit set was quantified as the proportion of flowers that had expanded ovaries (containing at least some viable seeds).Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Our results are supported by historical data that suggest P. palamedes and P. sennae are important pollinators of P. ciliaris.Although P. sennae may provide supplemental pollination service, this is likely constrained by habitat preferences that do not always overlap with those of P. cilaris.Observed declines of P. palamedes due to LWD could severely limit the reproductive success and persistence of P. ciliaris and similar orchid species populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Biology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901, USA adam.chupp@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus