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Nitrogen addition and harvest frequency rather than initial plant species composition determine vertical structure and light interception in grasslands.

Petersen U, Isselstein J - AoB Plants (2015)

Bottom Line: In biodiversity experiments based on seeded experimental communities, species richness and species composition exert a strong influence on canopy structure and can lead to an improved use of aboveground resources.However, the allocation of biomass in response to cutting and fertilization differed among the sward types.Management had a much stronger influence on structure and light interception than plant species composition in this grassland experiment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Crop Sciences, University of Göttingen, Von-Siebold-Str. 8, D-37075 Göttingen, Germany Present address: Johann Heinrich von Thünen Institute, Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and Fisheries, Institute of Climate-Smart Agriculture (AK), Bundesallee 50, D-38116 Braunschweig, Germany Ute_Petersen@gmx.net.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Extinction coefficient in the different experimental treatments in July 2009. Asterisks denote significant differences of factor levels compared with the reference level (sward control, utilization 1/year, control_ x). Interaction sward × nutrients (F(2, 49) = 3.30, P = 0.045).
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PLV089F4: Extinction coefficient in the different experimental treatments in July 2009. Asterisks denote significant differences of factor levels compared with the reference level (sward control, utilization 1/year, control_ x). Interaction sward × nutrients (F(2, 49) = 3.30, P = 0.045).

Mentions: The extinction coefficient was lowered by a high cutting frequency (Fig. 4). In both Co- and –Mon-swards, it increased due to fertilization, whereas the –Dic-swards showed a similar light extinction in both nutrient regimes (sward × nutrient interaction in ANOVA, F(2, 49) = 3.30, P = 0.045). In just a few of the fertilized Co-swards, the leaves grew mainly in wide angles (>45° between stem and leaf), indicated by an extinction coefficient k larger than 1. The vegetation in all other treatments showed an equal distribution of leaf angles apart from the vegetation in the –Dic-swards, which had mainly vertically orientated leaves (leaf angle <45°, 0.3 < k < 0.7). In spite of these different extinction coefficients, the light reaching the ground was similar in all sward types; it was only influenced by management regime (Table 3).Table 3.


Nitrogen addition and harvest frequency rather than initial plant species composition determine vertical structure and light interception in grasslands.

Petersen U, Isselstein J - AoB Plants (2015)

Extinction coefficient in the different experimental treatments in July 2009. Asterisks denote significant differences of factor levels compared with the reference level (sward control, utilization 1/year, control_ x). Interaction sward × nutrients (F(2, 49) = 3.30, P = 0.045).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4584960&req=5

PLV089F4: Extinction coefficient in the different experimental treatments in July 2009. Asterisks denote significant differences of factor levels compared with the reference level (sward control, utilization 1/year, control_ x). Interaction sward × nutrients (F(2, 49) = 3.30, P = 0.045).
Mentions: The extinction coefficient was lowered by a high cutting frequency (Fig. 4). In both Co- and –Mon-swards, it increased due to fertilization, whereas the –Dic-swards showed a similar light extinction in both nutrient regimes (sward × nutrient interaction in ANOVA, F(2, 49) = 3.30, P = 0.045). In just a few of the fertilized Co-swards, the leaves grew mainly in wide angles (>45° between stem and leaf), indicated by an extinction coefficient k larger than 1. The vegetation in all other treatments showed an equal distribution of leaf angles apart from the vegetation in the –Dic-swards, which had mainly vertically orientated leaves (leaf angle <45°, 0.3 < k < 0.7). In spite of these different extinction coefficients, the light reaching the ground was similar in all sward types; it was only influenced by management regime (Table 3).Table 3.

Bottom Line: In biodiversity experiments based on seeded experimental communities, species richness and species composition exert a strong influence on canopy structure and can lead to an improved use of aboveground resources.However, the allocation of biomass in response to cutting and fertilization differed among the sward types.Management had a much stronger influence on structure and light interception than plant species composition in this grassland experiment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Crop Sciences, University of Göttingen, Von-Siebold-Str. 8, D-37075 Göttingen, Germany Present address: Johann Heinrich von Thünen Institute, Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and Fisheries, Institute of Climate-Smart Agriculture (AK), Bundesallee 50, D-38116 Braunschweig, Germany Ute_Petersen@gmx.net.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus